Relationships and engagement

Since the late 1800s, the RCMP has relied on the help of Indigenous Peoples and communities. This includes support from Indigenous leaders, scouts, guides, interpreters and Special Constables. The RCMP's relationship with Indigenous Peoples remains a priority, and continues to evolve on the path towards reconciliation.

Delivering culturally aware and engaged police services helps us to build relationships, trust and partnerships, and ensure we deliver the highest quality services to the Indigenous communities and people we serve.

Listening to Indigenous voices

Listening to Indigenous voices and incorporating their perspectives is essential. We engage with Indigenous Elders, communities, youth advocates, academics and advisory bodies across Canada in various forums.

We're grateful for the advice and perspectives that are provided by:

  • the Commissioner's National Indigenous Advisory Committee
  • a national Indigenous advisory committee that provides input on violence prevention and operational policy
  • a council of Elders
  • Commanding Officer Indigenous advisory committees who collaborate with Indigenous people to understand what they expect of the RCMP in their jurisdictions
  • the RCMP National Youth Advisory Committee
  • Métis coordinators in five provinces/territories, who work with Métis communities
  • the internal RCMP Reconciliation Working Group
  • Community Consultative Groups in communities that have Community Tripartite Agreements under the First Nation Policing Program
  • RCMP Indigenous employees

We also engage with national Indigenous organizations such as:

Our commitment to a diverse workforce

We're committed to a diverse workforce, and to supporting our more than 1,900 Indigenous employees. Indigenous employees bring their unique perspectives and contributions to their work. They help ensure our programs and policies are culturally relevant.

Video: Diversity in our workforce - Highlighting Indigenous RCMP employees

    Diversity in our workforce - Highlighting Indigenous RCMP employees

    (Text on screen: CST. STEPHAN KILABUK IQALUIT, NVT.)

    (A male officer stands in a living room wearing a green uniform. He looks out the window with binoculars. He turns around to his left to catch a notebook. He then steps toward the camera and covers the lens with the notebook.

    He uncovers the lens, and places the notebook against the window. He is dressed in a long sleeved white shirt with a hood, complete with a green trim, as he holds a wood harpoon. He rubs a piece of sandpaper on the wood, blows away dust, and inspects it. He takes the notebook from the window and throws it to the right.)

    (Text on screen: CST. REBECCA MUNRO NLAKA'PAMUX NATION, B.C.)

    (A female officer catches a notebook thrown from the left. She is standing outdoors in a meadow. She is dressed in a short sleeved, blue police uniform with a vest with the word POLICE. She smiles, steps toward the camera, and covers the lens with the notebook.

    She removes the notebook from the front of the camera. Her hair is worn down. She is wearing beaded earrings, a black t-shirt, a beaded necklace, a long red skirt, and a pair of moccasins. She holds a drum. She throws the notebook to the right.)

    (Text on screen: CPL. KEITH HENDRICKS WINNIPEG, MAN.)

    (A male officer in a living room catches a notebook thrown to him from the left. He is dressed in a red ceremonial RCMP uniform, a Stetson hat and boots. He steps toward the camera, and covers the lens with the notebook.

    He removes the notebook from the front of the camera. He wears a t-shirt and jeans, a red sash tied around his waist, a cross body bag, and a pair of moccasins. He steps backwards, stops and performs a short dance. He throws the notebook to the right.)

    (Text on screen: CST. NAOMI GOOD HAILZAQV NATION & SNUNEYMUXW FIRST NATION, B.C.)

    (A female officer catches a notebook from the left. She wears a short sleeved police uniform with a vest with the word POLICE. RCMP vehicles are parked behind her. She approaches the camera and covers the lens with the notebook.

    She removes the notebook from the front of the camera and steps back. She wears a long skirt and a ceremonial cape, a headpiece and she holds a feather. She spins around, then throws the notebook to the right.)

    (Text on screen: CPL. SUSAN BOYES THE PAS, MAN.)

    (A female officer catches a notebook thrown to her from the left. She stands beside a building and wears a long sleeved police uniform with a vest with the word POLICE. She approaches the camera and covers the lens with the notebook.

    She removes the notebook from the front of the camera. She takes a few steps backwards. She wears a dress shirt and pants, with a fringed vest and a sash tied around her waist. She throws the notebook to the right.)

    (Text on screen: CST. LEE BROCHU RED DEER, ALTA.)

    (A male officer catches a notebook from the left. He stands beside a RCMP vehicle. He wears a long sleeved police uniform with a bulletproof vest with the word POLICE. He approaches the camera and covers the lens with the notebook.

    He lifts the notebook from the front of the camera and takes a few steps back. He wears a dress shirt decorated with ribbons and a sash tied around his waist. He throws the notebook to the right.)

    (Text on screen: TRACEY PAUL KIRKPATRICK KINGSCLEAR FIRST NATION, N.B.)

    (A female catches a notebook thrown from the left. She stands in a living room. She wears a business shirt and her hair is down. She approaches the camera and covers the lens with the notebook.

    She lifts the notebook from the front of the camera. Her hair is fastened in braids and she wears beaded earrings.

    She holds an eagle feather. She turns around once, pauses, and tosses the notebook to the right.)

    (Screen fades to black.)

    (Text on screen: Royal Canadian Mounted Police / Gendarmerie royale du Canada signature © Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada, as represented by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 2020.)

    (Canada wordmark)

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