Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2018‑19 Departmental Results Report

Minister's message

The Honourable Bill Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am pleased to present to Parliament the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's (RCMP) Departmental Results Report for the period ending March 31, 2019.

As Canada's national police force, and as the provincial/territorial local police force in many parts of Canada, the RCMP plays a key role in keeping Canadians safe and safeguarding Canadians' rights and freedoms.

In 2018‑19, the RCMP continued its efforts to align resources against the highest threats to achieve the greatest impact, while modernizing and diversifying its workforce. The RCMP worked in close collaboration with domestic and international partners to combat organized crime, provide security for Canada's G7 Presidency Year, and enhance policing services. The RCMP also established a National Cybercrime Coordination Unit, which allows Canadian law enforcement agencies to address cybercrime in a collaborative and effective manner.

The RCMP is continuing its process of transformation and modernization with a vision for the organization's way forward. Renewed focus has been placed on the RCMP's people, culture, stewardship, and policing services as the mechanisms to modernize and move the organization towards becoming even more trusted, inclusive, accountable, and committed to its employees, its partners, and the communities it serves.

I look forward to continuing this important work with Commissioner Lucki and all the dedicated employees of the RCMP.

The Honourable Bill Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Results at a glance

What funds were used? Actual spending of $3,789,228,428

Who was involved? 29,870 Full Time Equivalents

Results Highlights

  • The RCMP aimed to reduce crime and victimization by working across the continuum of education, prevention, and early intervention. Key achievements from 2018‑19 included a national toolkit to address rural crime, work on a national impaired driving strategy, and progress to raise awareness around cannabis legalization and drug-impaired driving. Cannabis legalization workshops were delivered at over 100 schools and youth centres across Canada, reaching over 19,000 students, while over 50,000 toolkits were distributed to police officers, parents, and persons working with youth.
  • RCMP Federal Policing investigations are complex and often last multiple years. Several cases were concluded in 2018‑19, including an important money laundering investigation. In February 2019, under Project Collecteur over 150 RCMP officers in Quebec and Ontario, in addition to employees of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and local police services, disrupted a Canadian International Controller Network and charged 18 subjects, including 11 individuals in Montreal and 7 individuals in Toronto. Several locations were also searched (4 in Montreal, 7 in Toronto) and restraint orders were served by both the RCMP and the CRA for proceeds of crime assets valued at approximately $20 million.
  • The RCMP continued to implement leading-edge scientific advancements and improve workflow efficiencies. National Forensic Laboratory Services (NFLS) began testing technology to widen the range of potential forensic DNA applications. One such application consists of entering predictions of biological, ethnic, and/or geographical origins and physical characteristics to assist in investigations where no suspects are known.
  • In 2018‑19, the RCMP took important steps to ensure deliberations and activities reflected and promoted diversity and inclusion. Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) continued to be implemented and was used as a critical thinking tool to support the development of policies, programs, and operations. For example, the RCMP recruitment process was reviewed using a GBA+ lens to identify barriers for diverse applicants, including a Fairness Review of the RCMP entrance exam.

For more information on the RCMP's plans, priorities, and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Police Operations

Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program provides Canadians with policing services at the federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal levels and within Indigenous communities. As described in the RCMP Act, these services include all duties that are assigned to peace officers in relation to: the preservation of the peace; the prevention of crime and of offences against the laws of Canada and the laws in force in any province/territory in which they may be employed; the apprehension of criminals and offenders and others who may be lawfully taken into custody; the execution of all warrants, and performance of all duties and services in relation thereto, that may, under the RCMP Act or the laws of Canada or the laws in force in any province/territory, be lawfully executed and performed by peace officers; and, the performance of other duties and functions as are prescribed by the Governor in Council or the Commissioner. This Program contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities, as well as education and awareness activities delivered by employees of the RCMP to the public, businesses, and other agencies/organizations within Canada. The RCMP's education and awareness activities – such as information sessions on crime prevention, national security, financial crime, and drugs and organized crime – are aimed at reducing victimization of Canadians. This Program also ensures the protection of designated persons and security at major events, which in turn mitigates any potential threats to Canada's population. Finally, this Program delivers a high level of technical and operational support to the Canadian law enforcement community. Taken together, these activities ensure the RCMP reaches its overarching goal of reducing criminal activity affecting Canadians.

Results

Contract and Indigenous Policing

Several initiatives were implemented throughout the year to support a reduction in the rate and severity level of crime in RCMP jurisdictions. Emphasis was placed on enhanced policing services, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, support for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG), as well as modernization and development efforts.

Enhanced Policing Services

The RCMP continued to develop national policies and procedures to govern contracted enforcement activities, the Criminal Code of Canada, and traffic services. This included:

  • Providing national coordination, expertise, and leadership to increase situational awareness;
  • Preventing, reducing, and intervening on crimes by focusing on risk factors before criminal activity takes place;
  • Promoting crime prevention practices; and,
  • Developing and modifying policy, training, equipment, and best practices to provide effective policing services.

In emphasizing information flow, refined processes, and improved consultation, the RCMP enhanced its relationship with contract policing partners, which has led to higher compliance rates, more fulsome multi-year financial plans, and improved governance. The RCMP also updated its General Duty Policy Resourcing Model (GDPRM) to estimate front-line general duty staffing levels at its detachments and divisions. The GDPRM is a computerized simulation to analyze estimated workloads; such findings informed the resource determination process between the RCMP and contract jurisdictions. Taken together, these efforts ensured that the RCMP's contract resources were and continue to be deployed to areas of greatest need, while meeting contract partner requirements.

Sexual Assault Investigations

Since publishing The Way Forward: The RCMP's sexual assault review and victim support action plan, the RCMP revised its approach to investigating sexual assaults, with identified objectives to: treat victims with compassion, care, and respect; conduct sexual assault investigations across Canada consistently and to the highest professional standards, with oversight practices established to ensure investigative accountability; and increase public awareness and trust of RCMP sexual assault investigations, thereby encouraging greater levels of reporting. In 2018‑19, the necessary framework was completed to allow Divisions to establish Sexual Assault Investigations Review Committees (SAIRC). SAIRCs will become an extension of the sexual assault investigation process, ensuring investigations are thorough, timely, impartial, and properly classified.

Indigenous Policing and Reconciliation

The RCMP recognizes that its relationship with National Indigenous Organizations (NIOs) is critical to advancing change as fundamental as Reconciliation. In 2018‑19, the RCMP advanced the Relationship Building Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and engaged in ongoing dialogue with other NIOs. Efforts continued on the renewal of the Relationship Building Protocol with the AFN, and the RCMP participated in the grand entries of the July 2018 AFN Annual General Meeting in Vancouver and the December 2018 Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa.

In addition, Contract and Indigenous Policing continued to research, assess, and support the development of Indigenous cultural awareness training. During 2018‑19, the RCMP designed and developed content for two training courses that will be offered to all RCMP employees over a three-year period, beginning in 2019-20. The courses, entitled "Cultural Awareness and Humility" and "Using a Trauma-Informed Approach", aim to improve capacity across the RCMP to respond to gender-based violence in a gender and culturally sensitive manner, including violence against Indigenous women and girls. An Advisory Council of Elders, consisting of representatives from First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, provided a cultural perspective in the development and content review of course training materials.

Finally, the RCMP worked with partners from the Department of Justice, NIOs, and the National Association of Friendship Centres on restorative justice activities. As a result, restorative justice programs already in place were better aligned, education and awareness tools were developed for RCMP employees, policy development activities progressed to increase referrals to restorative justice programs, and reporting mechanisms were developed to begin data collection in 2019.

Support for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The RCMP's dedicated inquiry team provided full cooperation and participation to the National Inquiry into MMIWG. Throughout the reporting year, the team responded to requests from the National Inquiry, preparing, redacting, and producing 119 files and 226 policy and related documents; managed the retention of all MMIWG-related documents; listened to public testimony from families and survivors; conducted analyses; prepared documents for senior executives for RCMP testimony; and provided documents as evidence to the inquiry.

Modernization and Development

Contract and Indigenous Policing continued to assess public and officer safety issues, while exploring opportunities for new preventative tactics and intervention tools. Projects undertaken in 2018‑19 included training for drug-impaired driving detection, as well as the rollout of oral fluid drug screening devices for use by front-line officers.

In addition, the RCMP continued to modernize and standardize its Emergency Response Teams (ERT). For example, the ERT selection process was reviewed using GBA+, leading to a meaningful review of the ERT task bank, to help address both real and perceived barriers to the application process and ensure qualified and diverse candidates can join ERT teams across Canada.

The RCMP also undertook a number of initiatives to increase the number of trained police officers available to meet jurisdictional needs. A targeted approach was used to recruit, advertise, market, and position the RCMP as an employer of choice, specifically to those who may not have considered a career in policing. Moreover, the RCMP began partnerships with two police training institutions and re-launched the Experienced Police Officer Program. Both of these initiatives have allowed the RCMP to hire qualified candidates as Regular Members in an expedited manner. Due to the RCMP's continued efforts in recruiting, the RCMP enrolled 1,280 Cadets to its training academy, Depot, in 2018‑19, an increase from 1,152 cadets in the previous year.

Federal Policing

In 2018‑19, Federal Policing focused on threats to the safety and security of the people of Canada and Canadian interests, ensuring they are detected, prevented, and/or denied. This was supported by developing intelligence, conducting investigations, supporting prevention and engagement efforts, and enhancing policy and capacity development with respect to Federal Policing's priority areas of: money laundering and terrorist financing; illegal migration/human smuggling; suspected terrorists; cyber fundamentals; market enforcement; opioids; outlaw motorcycle gangs; and security for Canada's G7 Presidency Year.

Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing

The RCMP continued to work closely with its domestic and international partners to combat terrorist financing. This included organizing and participating in the annual meeting of the Five Eyes Terrorist Financing Working Group in March 2019, as well as participation at parliamentary review committees to discuss legal and policy challenges that affect successful money laundering investigations, while meeting with divisional investigators to advance collective understanding of issues and discuss investigative strategies.

Illegal Migration and Human Smuggling

Federal Policing oversaw and coordinated a technology modernization project funded through Defence Research and Development Canada's Canadian Safety and Security program to secure Canada's maritime border. A collaboration between the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Marine Law Enforcement Academy and the RCMP Federal Policing Border Integrity Unit resulted in a newly-designed program delivered to 21 USCG and seven Canadian law enforcement officers. Further, the Marine Security Operations detachment in British Columbia, in partnership with the Joint Interagency Task Force West, organized and held a four-day simulated emergency exercise for Five Eyes partners and French law enforcement.

The RCMP also enhanced border integrity by identifying, investigating, and preventing cross-border criminal activities. For example, a number of tobacco, cocaine, and human smuggling investigations were conducted in Quebec; Saskatchewan's Integrated Border Enforcement Team deployed technology to detect low flying aircraft; and Radio Interoperability was used in a cross-border investigation. The RCMP also continued to generate operational intelligence pertaining to international human trafficking affecting Canada. For instance, a file related to an inter-provincial organized crime human smuggling ring with ties to European entities was transitioned to an RCMP operational unit for an investigation that is currently ongoing. Notably, in 2018‑19, the RCMP intercepted and conducted preliminary assessments on 17,065 people entering Canada from the United States through irregular migration.

Suspected Terrorists

Federal Policing disrupted and mitigated the threat of terrorism by working with partner jurisdictions. Notably, a national security investigation resulted in a Kingston, Ontario minor being arrested and charged in January 2019 with knowingly facilitating a terrorist activity, uttering threats, making or possessing an explosive substance, and counselling another person to deliver, place, discharge or detonate an explosive device. Over 400 RCMP employees and 45 police officers from four Ontario police services provided operational and administrative services in support of the investigation. These resources represented over 30 areas of specialization, highlighting the complexity of the investigation, as well as the RCMP's ability to mobilize resources to mitigate risks to public safety and respond to threats.

The First Responder Terrorism Awareness Program continued to receive positive evaluation reviews from its preventative training lessons provided to emergency responders, government partners, and other police services on Canada's national security environment, violent extremism, terrorism awareness, and critical infrastructure.

Cyber Fundamentals

The continual criminal exploitation of technologies requires the RCMP to respond with new policing skills and competencies. As a result, the RCMP adapted its investigative approaches, built capacity, and worked in close collaboration with key government departments and agencies to protect Canadians and critical infrastructure from cyber threats.

The RCMP held monthly calls with police of jurisdiction (POJ) on cybercrime and developed awareness bulletins for POJs and the public. Regular meetings were also held with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and federal partners. Two cyber awareness sessions were hosted by the RCMP, one for the cyber security industry and the other for financial institutions. Resulting from the awareness sessions, a Cybercrime Collaboration Advisory Group was formed to focus on actors causing the most harm. The RCMP also participated in and presented at a variety of international fora to contribute to its own, as well as others', capacity in the area of cybercrime.

Cybercrime charges were laid in several criminal investigations, and the "Hacker for Hire" case resulted in the extradition and sentencing of a Canadian man to five years in prison for his role in hacking thousands of webmail accounts. Footnote 1

In 2018‑19, the RCMP received Government approval and funding to create the National Cybercrime Coordination (NC3) Unit, which allows Canadian law enforcement agencies to address cybercrime in a more collaborative and effective manner. Once implemented, the NC3 will establish a national mechanism for Canadians and businesses to report cybercrimes to police. As of the end of 2018‑19, the NC3 began staffing newly created positions, identified IM/IT business requirements, engaged in outreach activities with partners, and developed standard operating procedures, all of which will support the upcoming April 1, 2020 initial operating capacity date. To ensure coordination and consistency, this work included frequent engagement with the RCMP's Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security of the Communications Security Establishment. Of note, the NC3 established a partnership with the Canadian Digital Service (CDS) to design a new public reporting system for victims of cybercrime to report to law enforcement. The IT solution designed through this process will offer an agile approach to product service delivery, using cross-functional teams to deliver a public reporting system. The new public reporting system is scheduled for full implementation by 2022.

Market Enforcement

In 2018‑19, the RCMP focused on preventing, disrupting, and investigating criminal misconduct in Canada's capital markets through established networks with key partner agencies, regionally and nationally. During this transformative year, 17 of the RCMP's top financial crime investigations had a capital market fraud focus.

An internal review led to steps being taken over the reporting period to ensure performance improvement of the Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMET), including developing an action plan focused on program organization, human resources, and operational effectiveness. As part of a relationship enhancing initiative under the action plan, the RCMP met with the Chairs of the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) to discuss collaboration and advise them of ongoing operations.

Opioids

Federal Policing enacted its national operational strategy to detect, disrupt, and dismantle criminal networks of synthetic opioid importers, distributors, manufacturers, and traffickers. Compared to previous years, there was a decrease in importation seizures in 2018‑19. Working with the Canada Border Services Agency and Canada Post, it was determined that alternative methods of cross-border shipping are being pursued by organized crime groups and may have caused the decrease.

While street-level fentanyl seizures increased in number, the overall volume seized decreased. The RCMP seized significantly less fentanyl and fentanyl analogues in pill and stamp form – yet more in the form of powder, liquid, and patches – at the street level in 2018 when compared to the amounts seized in 2017. Footnote 2 Purchases and shipments via the dark web posed a challenge. Several investigations were also concluded:

  • Project Crocodile: Five individuals operating and selling illegal drugs on the dark web were arrested and charged with multiple Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) offences. Two of the accused were sentenced to 12 years' imprisonment.
  • Project OButton: Four individuals were charged in May 2018 with multiple offences under the CDSA following the investigation of a Toronto-based dark web vendor.
  • Project OBermuda: A transnational criminal organization involved in drug trafficking and money laundering was taken down by RCMP and municipal Greater Toronto Area partners. Nine individuals were arrested and one has received a sentence of seven years in jail.
  • Project OJaw: In September 2018, a Toronto-based dark web vendor of illegal substances including fentanyl was identified and charged. The suspect, with no prior record, entered a guilty plea for trafficking fentanyl, possession of fentanyl, and five firearms charges. A 10-year sentence resulted.

Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

Federal Policing developed an Operational Framework on Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs (OMG), in close collaboration with law enforcement partners. This enabled respective jurisdictions to address OMGs through the sharing of intelligence and best practices.

The OMG Outreach initiative enhanced the RCMP's capacity to advance investigations abroad, disrupt criminal activities, and build better relationships to assist in the fight against OMG expansion and criminal activities. Based on intelligence gathered, there is an increase in OMG activities abroad. Meetings with senior law enforcement partners set the stage for international collaboration to address the OMG threat.

G7 Security for Canada's Presidency Year

The RCMP worked to ensure the safety and security of the general public, internationally-protected persons, and other visiting dignitaries under its lead security role for the G7 Leaders' Summit in June 2018. Using an integrated planning model, the RCMP worked with government and non-government safety and security partners, both domestic and international, to develop and exercise intelligence-led plans for the operation of the G7 Summit.

During the Summit, the RCMP coordinated the deployment of a massive workforce as well as hundreds of emergency services vehicles and additional safety and protective equipment. Although there were protests, there were no significant safety or security incidents during the events that could not be resolved locally by the security complement.

Technical Services and Operational Support

Building Core Technical Capabilities

In 2018‑19, Technical Investigative Services (TIS) received 4,167 digital devices for the forensic extraction and analysis of data in support of investigations, the majority of which pertained to national security and serious criminal investigations – a slight decrease over the previous reporting cycle (4,365). The RCMP continues to face challenges as a result of an increasing gap between the lawful authority of investigators to collect digital evidence and their ability to do so. The use of encryption by criminals has significantly reduced the amount of data accessible to investigators and, as such, TIS continued to collaborate with domestic and international partners to collectively develop and acquire technical solutions for such devices.

During the reporting period, the RCMP responded to over 85 requests for specialized tools and services for investigations conducted by the RCMP and by other law enforcement agencies. The RCMP led several discussions with the Public Prosecution Services of Canada to further define how sensitive tools and techniques are applied across Canada, to ensure consistency in the way in which they are described in affidavits and Information to Obtain documents, and to increase the RCMP's ability to conduct effective and Charter-compliant investigations. The RCMP's Technical Case Management Program (TCMP) was established to provide technical advice and case management to identify the appropriate technical capabilities required to satisfy investigative objectives. Although still in a pilot phase, TCMP has facilitated the resolution of several complex disclosure challenges related to high-profile investigations and has improved the RCMP's ability to investigate in today's complex law enforcement environment.

Protecting Government Facilities and Assets

In 2018‑19, the RCMP deployed new protective technologies to secure government facilities and assets from terrorist and other potential threats, including Parliament Hill, the Official Residences and RCMP facilities. In addition, investments were made to modernize the security infrastructure in various locations, which resulted in the introduction of new protective technology installations, including electronic and physical security systems. Progress was also made in the identification of new protective technologies to detect and counter threats posed by unmanned aerial systems.

The RCMP conducted evaluations and testing of video analytics technologies, advanced its partnership with Shared Services Canada (SSC) with the provision of RCMP security infrastructure designs for several SSC locations, and designed and implemented protective technology measures in support of the G7 in Charlevoix, Quebec. The RCMP continued to maintain and evergreen all existing security technology infrastructure and equipment to ensure uninterrupted operations of electronic and mechanical physical security systems.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018‑19
Actual results
2017‑18
Actual results
2016‑17
Actual results
The rate and severity level of crime is reduced Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's contribution to a safe and secure Canada" 80% March 31, 2019 77% Footnote 3 77% 80%
Reduction in the severity level of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 96 March 31, 2019 98 Footnote 4 101 100
Reduction in the per capita rate of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 8,854 March 31, 2018 8,381 Footnote 5 8,592 8,679

The RCMP's performance indicators, noted above and throughout the report, date from the implementation of the Performance Measurement Framework in 2013-14. Due to the transition under the Policy on Results, indicators have not aligned with program goals and management direction. As such, results may not be available on older indicators. Every effort has been made to identify meaningful performance indicators under the Departmental Results Framework, which will be the structure for all future RCMP performance reports as of the 2020-21 fiscal year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
2,317,576,842 2,317,576,842 2,563,775,094 2,400,537,080 82,960,238
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
22,587 22,509 (78)

Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Description

This Program provides the Canadian law enforcement community with the necessary scientific, technical, investigative, and educational support to deliver proactive, intelligence-based policing and law enforcement services to their respective communities and partners. Additionally, this Program provides educational opportunities to members of the Canadian law enforcement community to enable them to develop their skills, thus increasing their effectiveness in contributing to a safer Canada.

Results

In addition to the achievements outlined below, Canadian Law Enforcement Services worked with partners in Federal Policing and Contract and Indigenous Policing to enable operational priorities, including Indigenous Policing and Reconciliation, Illegal Migration/Human Smuggling, Cyber Fundamentals, Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs, and G7 Security.

Enhancing Forensic Science and Identification Capacity

In support of Canada's broader immigration objectives, the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) retains immigration fingerprints on behalf of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and provides identity verification support to the Canada Border Services Agency, when applicants arrive at Canadian ports-of-entry. As of December 31, 2018, IRCC required foreign nationals from 195 countries to submit fingerprint-based verification for visa purposes when visiting Canada. As a result, the volume of immigration fingerprint enrollments conducted by CCRTIS increased from 653,130 to 2,070,558 (a 217% increase) and the number of identity verification increased from 5,095 to 19,946 (a 292% increase). Through the internal management of program resources and efficiencies, CCRTIS was able to absorb this increase in volume while also maintaining current service standards.

Protecting Vulnerable Canadians

The RCMP's National Missing Persons DNA Program became operational in 2018‑19 upon legislative amendments to the DNA Identification Act. As of March 31, 2019, there were a total of 267 DNA profiles contained in the three new humanitarian indices: 19 DNA profiles in the Missing Persons Index; 138 DNA profiles in the Relatives of Missing Persons Index; and 110 DNA profiles in the Human Remains Index. Moreover, the National DNA Data Bank began validating new technology for the analysis of mitochondrial DNA to further enhance their ability to assist in missing persons and human remains investigations.

Amendments to the DNA Identification Act also led to the creation of a Victims Index and a Voluntary Donors Index to assist both criminal and humanitarian investigations. As of March 31, 2019, there were 19 DNA profiles in the Victims Index and no DNA profiles in the Voluntary Donors Index. To date, two matches have been made between DNA profiles in the Victims Index and DNA profiles in the Convicted Offenders Index.

Efforts were also focused on providing operational support to investigations and updating technological tools, including the Missing Children and Persons and Unidentified Remains database, the Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System, and the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) database. Modernization of the NSOR database focused on the increasing number of registered sex offenders, new offender reporting obligations, and new information-sharing requirements with key law enforcement partners. Significant efforts were also made to improve the overall functionality and quality of information contained within the existing NSOR database. In response to changes made by the Tougher Penalties for Child Predators Act, the newly formed High Risk Sex Offender Unit conducted approximately 500 risk assessments of NSOR registrants in 2018 to identify high-risk offenders. High-risk offenders were identified through this assessment process for the purpose of information sharing with law enforcement partners and enhanced monitoring procedures, including international travel.

The RCMP's National Child Exploitation Crime Centre (NCECC) received approximately 61,174 reports, complaints, and requests for assistance during the 2018‑19 reporting period, an increase of 71% over the previous year. As a result, the NCECC experienced a backlog at the end of 2018‑19. The NCECC provided 3,278 investigational packages to police agencies of jurisdiction in 2018‑19 and actively contributed to the International Child Sexual Exploitation Database (ICSE) managed by INTERPOL. The ICSE database helps internationally in the identification of victims, and the success attributable to the number of victims identified is directly associated with the efforts of law enforcement units around the world. To this end, the NCECC has been able to significantly increase the number of Canadian victims identified without significantly increasing resources. These numbers should see a continued increase in the following year with the addition of two new NCECC resources as of October 2019. Overall, as of December 31, 2018, Canadian law enforcement agencies identified and contributed information regarding 162 Canadian victims to the ICSE, making Canada the third largest contributor of identified victims out of 48 member countries.

Criminal Use of Firearms and Gang Violence

Throughout the year, under the RCMP, the Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) implemented elements of the Initiative to Take Action Against Guns and Gang Violence to increase capacity and prioritize specialized support to investigations. Results included staffing positions related to investigative support, physical firearms inspections, intelligence development, prioritization of the Canadian Integrated Ballistics Identification Network, and enhanced analytical capacity. Stakeholders were engaged in regular meetings to discuss opportunities to collaborate and effectively align efforts to target gun and gang crime. The CFP also delivered specialized training to law enforcement partners focused on firearms identification, handling seized firearms, and familiarization with the RCMP's Firearms Reference Table.

To strengthen measures related to firearms licence eligibility for persons with mental health issues, the CFP continued to develop an effective approach to investigate and assess safety risks posed by mental health disorders and other situational factors. The CFP also contributed to the mandate priorities of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness by providing input and strategic policy advice on Bill C-71, an Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms. Furthermore, the RCMP supported the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction and the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness by providing technical advice to support ongoing public consultations regarding handguns.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018‑19
Actual results
2017‑18
Actual results
2016‑17
Actual results
Technical, forensic, investigative, and educational activities support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "overall the RCMP provides high quality service" 80% March 31, 2019 78% 78% 76%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
192,251,844 192,251,844 203,515,173 187,465,029 (4,786,815)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
1,314 1,250 (64)

International Policing Operations

Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program furthers Canada's global peace and security agenda by cooperating with and supporting the international law enforcement community, thereby ensuring that both Canadians and the global community are safer. This Program addresses the transnational scope of crime by building relationships with international policing partners and by participating in the INTERPOL global information sharing network. Additionally, the RCMP actively participates in multiple missions abroad in a peacekeeping role and provides support to nations at risk to build their law enforcement capacity.

Results

The RCMP focused its international law enforcement efforts on advancing domestic police operations through: enhanced visibility, reach, and influence abroad; capacity building; and supporting Canadian international peace operations.

Advancing Operations

To enhance collaborative efforts, the RCMP conducted awareness and outreach activities with Canadian law enforcement partner agencies to provide information on RCMP programs and services that could be leveraged to further their operations.

Engagement with international law enforcement partners, such as through the RCMP's Liaison Officers and criminal analysts deployed abroad program, was critical to advancing many of the RCMP's domestic criminal investigations into cybercrime, national security, serious and organized crime, and financial crime. The RCMP also assisted international partners in their investigations, leading to the disruption of international criminal activity in Canadian society. For example, the RCMP worked closely with Indian authorities to disrupt and dismantle several call centers that preyed on hundreds of Canadian citizens by pretending to be representatives of the CRA. Further, an internal network of corrupt baggage handlers operating at the Toronto International Airport was dismantled after a coordinated operation revealed they were responsible for importing large amounts of drugs from various countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

In 2018, the RCMP Deputy Commissioner, Federal Policing, was elected to INTERPOL's nine-member executive to address the gaps in capabilities and capacities that exist amongst member countries, which have a direct impact on the safety of Canadians at home and abroad. The RCMP maintains this important relationship because, as part of INTERPOL's mandate to support law enforcement agencies, INTERPOL provides access to a range of global databases, facilitates the sharing of information and expertise, and can provide investigative and analytical support, all of which are valuable in tracking cross-border criminals and managing other files with an international nexus.

International Peace Operations

The RCMP managed the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations Program, supporting the Government of Canada's engagement in the United Nations and in other peace efforts. Such work included assessing and recommending international police peace operations for Canadian participation. Canadian police assisted in building and strengthening law-enforcement capacity in fragile and conflict-affected countries, with new officers deployed to missions in Haiti, the West Bank, Iraq, Ukraine, Mali, Ethiopia, and the Central African Republic government (contributing to an investigation by The Hague). Close to half of the officers deployed were female, which exceeded the United Nations goal of 20%. Through these programs, the RCMP contributed to global stability by developing and promoting initiatives that addressed transnational crime and counter-terrorism issues.

As part of the Government of Canada's National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, the International Police Peacekeeping Operations Program updated tools that are used in analyzing new missions. Gender-sensitive programming and sessions on women, peace, and security are now delivered to all deploying officers as part of their pre-deployment training. In addition to other GBA+ analysis done at the RCMP, all program personnel and new police deployed abroad, regardless of which police agency they are from, are required to take GBA+ training before they are sent on peacekeeping missions.

Furthermore, an RCMP-led gender barrier survey was launched in October 2018 and sent to female police officers across the country to identify barriers to women's participation in peace operations. The RCMP is analyzing the results and developing an action plan to reduce and/or eliminate these barriers.

Capacity Building

International training opportunities were offered by the RCMP to improve global capacity in countering transnational crimes. Courses on topics such as money laundering, terrorist financing, counter terrorism and internet child exploitation were supported and delivered in multiple countries including Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Colombia, Jamaica, India, Jakarta, and Colombia.

The RCMP also delivered GBA+ training to staff at the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation. RCMP managers in the capacity-building sector attended Global Affairs Canada's Gender Peace and Stability workshop, which teaches a foundational toolset that can be applied in international settings.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018‑19
Actual results
2017‑18
Actual results
2016‑17
Actual results
Police cooperation and support is provided to the international law enforcement community to help create a safer and more stable environment Percentage of international engagements and deployments that are in line with RCMP international law enforcement priorities 80% March 31, 2019 100% 100% 89%
Canadian police deployed internationally have the specific skills and knowledge required to carry out their mission/operation Percentage of participants who strongly agree or agree with the statement "as a result of pre-deployment mission training, I have the skills and knowledge I require to carry out my mission/operation" 80% March 31, 2019 41% Footnote 6 80% 91%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
51,065,549 51,065,549 56,139,339 38,367,035 (12,698,514)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
178 158 (20)

Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

Description

In order to enhance the RCMP's internationally recognized image, reputation, and rich heritage, this Program works to promote the positive image of the RCMP while building relationships with domestic and international law enforcement, government, and community partners. The Program provides advice and analysis to internal and external clients regarding appropriate ceremonial features of special events and occurrences (e.g., the Olympics, Expos, Summits, and at funerals for police officers). These clients include federal, provincial, and municipal partners, academic institutions, Royal Household representatives, and non-government organizations. Through the activities of this Program, the RCMP contributes to Canada's vibrant culture and heritage.

Results

Partnerships

The Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program played a vital role in the promotion of law enforcement and community policing. As a nationally and internationally recognized symbol of Canada, the RCMP participated with partners and stakeholders on a variety of initiatives throughout the reporting period including responding to 24 requests for International Ceremonial Travel from Canadian Missions abroad.

Community Events

In 2018‑19, the Musical Ride offered 70 performances in the provinces of British Columbia and Ontario and in the state of Massachusetts. The performances helped raise over $792,000, funds which were reinvested by hosts in their respective communities.

Moreover, the Musical Ride, in partnership with the Canada Border Services Agency, Ottawa Fire Services, and the Governor General's Foot Guards, hosted its annual open house in February 2019 that resulted in a significant donation to the Ottawa Food Bank.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018‑19
Actual results
2017‑18
Actual results
2016‑17
Actual results

The RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada

Percentage of respondents who were satisfied with RCMP representation at international events 80% March 31, 2019 N/A Footnote 7 N/A Footnote 8 N/A Footnote 9
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
11,988,693 11,988,693 12,338,346 12,996,837 1,008,144
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
88 85 (3)

Transfer Payments

Description

This Program ensures that RCMP employees and their families are provided income security at their pension or in the event of disability or death, and that an appropriate level of support is afforded to those who are affected by circumstances beyond their control and as a result of their employment with the RCMP. The activities within this Program are either regulated by the terms and conditions of the grant or are statutory payments, for example, the RCMP Pension Continuation Act payments.

Results

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018‑19
Actual results
2017‑18
Actual results
2016‑17
Actual results
Claims and inquiries are processed within established service standards Percentage of claims and enquiries processed in accordance with established service standards 80% Percentage of claims and enquiries processed in accordance with established service standards N/A Footnote 10 N/A Footnote 11 N/A Footnote 12
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
246,436,483 246,436,483 293,442,600 282,279,124 35,842,641
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents

2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)

0 0 0

Information on the RCMP's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote 13

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communications Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

Results

Human Resources

In 2018‑19, Human Resources (HR) focused on several critical initiatives.

Business Intelligence The HR Sector focused on data integrity and business intelligence functionality in existing systems, in addition to other crucial enablers, to more effectively monitor workforce information and workforce requirement forecasts.
HR Requirements Business process improvements were introduced in areas of Staffing and Organization and Classification. This included the review of HR processes, timelines for potential efficiencies, monitoring effectiveness, and increasing the use of other potential resource streams to supplement existing resources and staffing plans.
HR Attestation A mandatory attestation process was implemented at both the national and divisional levels, which served to make programs think differently about employee category and timing. In addition, it facilitated important dialogue between program areas and HR and Corporate Management Sectors. This process has already realized significant shifts in the way the organization collectively approaches resource management and has yielded a decrease in Regular Member growth, but has increased the need for specialized civilians. As a result, this approach has significantly informed HR plans and priorities.

Professional Responsibility

The Professional Responsibility Sector continued to provide direction and leadership to support a regime focused on the highest level of integrity, while entrenching professional responsibility in all decision making. In 2018‑19, the Professional Responsibility Sector focused on several initiatives.

Harassment

The RCMP has taken action to address many of the recommendations put forth by the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission and former Auditor General Sheila Fraser in their reports on workplace harassment at the RCMP.

Progress has been made on several fronts including increasing the number of internal civilian investigators, and enhancing support, training, and efficiencies that enable decision makers to examine evidence and make determinations more expeditiously. In addition, procedures have been implemented for complaints of sexual harassment to be investigated by pre-qualified external investigators.

Ethical Governance Developmental training sessions were provided to current and future leaders as part of leadership development and professionalization initiatives.
Ethical Culture Research and analysis of the current RCMP Core Values is ongoing to determine if amendments are required to support the transformation and modernization of the RCMP's culture.

Supporting an Inclusive and Diverse Workforce

To ensure that the RCMP was able to deliver on expectations to identify and promote a diverse and inclusive workforce, additional resources were identified to carry out a variety of activities. Recommendations and responses to the RCMP on gender and diversity were tracked, GBA+ competencies were expanded among employees, and Employment Equity and diversity committees were harmonized.

Examples of activities included:

  • Establishing 17 Gender and Harassment Advisory Committees across the country to advise the Commissioner and Commanding Officers on issues related to gender, sexual orientation, harassment, equity and inclusivity, and support long-term organizational change strategies.
  • Introducing and institutionalizing GBA+ competencies by tying GBA+ training to promotional opportunities, which has resulted in over 7,700 employees completing the "Introduction to GBA+" online course. In addition, the Senior Executive Committee uses GBA+ in deliberations and decision making, and is regularly briefed on the progress of GBA+ initiatives.
  • Using GBA+ to update the RCMP uniform policy, resulting in modernized grooming policies, streamlined access to items such as the Hijab and Dastaar, measures to support reconciliation by developing a process for the incorporation of some Indigenous items as part of ceremonial dress, and the removal of binary gender references.
  • Changing the Officer Candidate Process (OCP) intake cycle, which previously occurred only in September. GBA+ revealed that this timing could deter some groups, including those with school-aged children. Since this change was implemented, women applicants to the OCP have increased by 12% and the overall number of applicants has increased.

Open and Transparent Government

In 2018‑19, the RCMP's Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Branch addressed over 8,500 ATIP Act requests. Due to the significant workload, the ATIP Branch undertook various initiatives to improve internal processes and client services, including hiring temporary resources to assist in addressing the backlog of unprocessed requests, working with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the ATIP community to establish a contracting vehicle for software to process digital requests, and presenting training sessions in multiple divisions and business lines. The RCMP ATIP Branch also supported the government's commitment on openness and transparency, updating business practices for Bill C-58, which amended the Access to Information Act to provide for the proactive publication of certain identified information and order making powers for the Information Commissioner of Canada.

In addition, National Communication Services (NCS) produced numerous national public awareness campaigns related to impaired driving and road safety, outlaw motorcycle gangs, fraud awareness, missing children, human trafficking, counterfeit and unlicensed pharmaceuticals, employee and family mental health, and police officer recruiting. In keeping with the government's focus on being open and transparent, NCS also linked subject-matter experts with media outlets to inform Canadians of the RCMP's work and priorities. NCS continued to raise the RCMP's profile with Canadians via its creative products used online and in social media, and by publishing the Gazette, the RCMP's national magazine. NCS also supported significant internal awareness campaigns related to modernizing the RCMP, workplace well-being, and personal well-being.

Operational Information Technology and Management

The RCMP worked on establishing a Digital Policing Strategy focused on supporting impactful and transformative change through investments in people, culture, data management, and new technology. The strategy will position the RCMP as an agile, modern, and innovative police service aligned with the Government of Canada digital principles and supporting the Commissioner's mandate to modernize the RCMP. This digital strategy is a multi-year organizational transformation roadmap that aligns governance, information, and technology with RCMP goals and broader Government modernization efforts. This digital strategy will leverage new and emerging technologies, increase access to internal and external data holdings to support decision making, ease the burden of technology on employees by providing modern, user-friendly tools and mobility, and increase digital channels to engage partners and citizens.

During 2018‑19, the RCMP received approval to replace and modernize two-way radio systems in Ontario, Quebec, the National Capital Region, New Brunswick, and Nunavut. These projects are now being initiated and, once complete, will provide mission-critical radio communication systems for seamless roaming and interoperability, enabling efficient and reliable communication to partner public safety agencies in both normal and emergency situations.

In February 2018, Gartner Consulting was engaged to evaluate the maturity of the RCMP's approach to data and analytics. Building on the current RCMP IM/IT infrastructure, and in accordance with the results of the Gartner evaluation, the RCMP established a project team with leadership authorized to ensure all data is managed within the organization as a strategic asset. This project team is focused on four key themes related to all RCMP business intelligence, data and analytics initiatives: alignment to strategic priorities; data governance and roles; data access and provisioning; and technology management. The RCMP vision to implement an improved IM/IT services business model will support a culture of innovation and measured continuous improvement.

In support of the RCMP's unique security requirements, a new Business Arrangement (BA) was negotiated with Shared Services Canada. This resulted in the creation of a dedicated team – Policing Infrastructure Operations – to better support vital policing operations and the RCMP's modernization.

Security Screening

The RCMP continues to work to improve the rigour and performance of security screening as guided by the Treasury Board of Canada's Policy on Government Security. For 2019-20, the RCMP is supporting efforts to improve service standards for the security screening of personnel. However, it has been determined that these improved service standards are unsustainable in future years as a result of anticipated growth and emerging Government of Canada priorities. Discussions continue internally regarding this deficiency and options for addressing it.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned
spending)
721,333,803 721,333,803 965,656,384 867,583,323 146,249,520
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018‑19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
5,763 5,868 105

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph (in millions)
2016‑17 2017‑18 2018‑19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22
Statutory 657 451 462 463 462 455
Voted 2,361 2,760 3,327 2,836 2,826 2,821
Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2018‑19
Main Estimates
2018‑19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2020-21
Planned spending Footnote 14
2018‑19
Total authorities available for use
2018‑19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017‑18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016‑17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Police Operations 2,317,576,842 2,317,576,842 2,192,263,363 2,187,958,307 2,563,775,094 2,400,537,080 1,891,655,870 1,838,068,322
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 192,251,844 192,251,844 170,148,269 169,233,233 203,515,173 187,465,029 182,370,525 159,347,221
International Policing Operations 51,065,549 51,065,549 51,099,114 51,124,252 56,139,339 38,367,035 43,542,013 47,136,030
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 11,988,693 11,988,693 11,991,226 11,991,398 12,338,346 12,996,837 14,147,947 15,061,088
Transfer Payments 246,436,483 246,436,483 187,736,483 187,736,483 293,442,600 282,279,124 223,026,852 196,862,445
Subtotal 2,819,319,411 2,819,319,411 2,613,238,455 2,608,043,673 3,129,210,552 2,921,645,105 2,354,743,207 2,256,475,106
Internal Services 721,333,803 721,333,803 685,338,001 680,329,715 965,656,384 867,583,323 856,240,683 761,150,978
Total 3,540,653,214 3,540,653,214 3,298,576,456 3,288,373,388 4,094,866,936 3,789,228,428 3,210,983,890 3,017,626,084

The RCMP's actual spending was $249 million higher than the planned spending identified in the 2018‑19 Departmental Plan. This increase is mainly attributed to incremental funding received throughout the year to:

  • Maintain front-line operations announced in Budget 2018 as the RCMP developed its comprehensive Departmental Review to address financial integrity issues and move forward its modernization agenda.
  • Increase Contract Policing services provided to provinces, municipalities, and Indigenous communities.
  • Address rising disability pension payments under the Grant to Compensate Members of the RCMP for Injuries Received in the Performance of Duty.
  • Implement the Initiative to take Action Against Guns and Gang Violence, and Canada's Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy.

In addition to these initiatives, the RCMP continues to experience increases in non-discretionary expenditures related to occupational and supplemental health and dental costs for Regular Members and ongoing claim payments related to the Merlo-Davidson settlement agreement.

Actual spending in the RCMP was $578 million or 19% higher in 2018‑19 when compared to 2017‑18. This is comprised of increases in: Gross Operating Expenditures of $21 million; Capital Expenditures of $35 million; Grants and Contributions of $59 million. These increases were offset by decreases in vote netted revenues of $477 million and Statutory Expenditures related to Employee Benefit Plan costs of $14 million.

More specifically, the RCMP experienced increased expenditures related to security measures in support of Canada hosting the 2018 G7 Leaders' Summit and continued efforts in support of recruiting, security clearing, and training cadets, in an effort to sustain operations and meet the requirement for new police officers.

The decrease to vote netted revenue is attributed to the implementation of the new funding model within the Contract Policing Program. Under the new funding model, revenues related to indirect costs of delivering the program are deposited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are not spent by the RCMP. As a result, the RCMP received an increase in appropriations to offset the change in its vote netted revenue.

Spending in Police Operations is expected to decrease in the 2019-20 fiscal year as a result of sun setting activities related to the 2018 G7 Leaders' Summit.

Budgetary actual gross spending summary (dollars)
Programs and
Internal Services
2018‑19
Actual gross spending
2018‑19
Actual gross spending
in specified purpose
accounts Footnote 15
2018‑19
Actual revenues
netted against
expenditures
2018‑19
Actual net spending
Police Operations 4,031,560,844 0 1,631,023,764 2,400,537,080
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 208,169,764 0 20,704,735 187,465,029
International Policing Operations 38,367,035 0 0 38,367,035
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 12,996,837 0 0 12,996,837
Transfer Payments 282,279,124 0 0 282,279,124
Subtotal 4,573,373,604 0 1,651,728,499 2,921,645,105
Internal Services 880,165,197 0 12,581,874 867,583,323
Total 5,453,538,801 0 1,664,310,373 3,789,228,428

The RCMP's 2018‑19 Actual Gross Spending was $5.45 billion, which includes $1.66 billion vote netted revenues, with total net spending of $3.79 billion. The vote netted revenues are largely related to the provision of Contract Policing services for recoveries of eligible costs from the contract jurisdictions in accordance with the Police Services Agreements. It also includes revenues related to the provision of protective services on Parliament Hill, the provision of DNA analysis through biology casework analysis agreements with provinces and territories, pension administration and training provided by the Canadian Police College.

The RCMP's 2018‑19 Departmental Plan included $1.70 billion of vote netted revenue authorities; actual revenues were $1.66 billion. The variance was largely attributable policing services in Contract Policing and the protective services on Parliament Hill, offset by additional revenue authorities sought throughout the year for the reimbursement of administration costs associated with the RCMP Pension Plan.

Vote netted revenues were $2.1 billion in 2017‑18, in comparison to $1.66 billion in 2018‑19. As identified in the 2018‑19 Departmental Plan, the reduction is primarily due to a new funding model for the Contract Policing Program that changed how the RCMP treats aspects of the revenues generated from its contracting partners. Effective April 2018, only those revenues related to direct costs are recorded as vote netted revenues and revenues collected for other types of costs are deposited to the consolidated revenue fund. Previously, these revenues were all treated as vote netted revenues.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and
Internal Services
2016‑17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017‑18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Planned
full-time equivalents
2018‑19
Actual
full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned
full-time equivalents
2020-21
Planned
full-time
equivalents Footnote 16
Police Operations 22,129 22,391 22,587 22,509 22,605 22,605
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 1,319 1,273 1,314 1,250 1,319 1,319
International Policing Operations 174 173 178 158 178 178
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 89 86 88 85 88 88
Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 23,711 23,923 24,167 24,002 24,190 24,190
Internal Services 5,463 5,632 5,763 5,868 5,803 5,856
Total 29,174 29,555 29,930 29,870 29,993 30,046

The RCMP's Human Resource Plan for 2018‑19 was 29,930 Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) and the organization ended the year in line with its plan at 29,870 FTEs.

The RCMP's workforce increased by 315 FTEs in comparison to 2017‑18. The increases were primarily in activities related to Force Generation as a result of the RCMP's focus on strengthening human resource capacity in existing programs and new initiatives. In addition, there was an overall increase within Protective Services in support of security measures for the 2018 G7 Leaders' Summit. In 2019-20, these resources will be reflected in the Contract Policing Program within Policing Operations.

The RCMP's human resources are not expected to increase substantially over the coming years. The majority of this growth can be attributed to increases in the Contract Policing Program as well as continued growth within programs in support of recruiting, security clearing, and training cadets, in an effort to sustain operations and meet the requirement for new police officers, as well as more recently announced Government initiatives.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the RCMP's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018-2019. Footnote 17

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the RCMP's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote 18

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The RCMP's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the the RCMP's website. Footnote 19

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information 2018‑19
Planned
results
2018‑19
Actual
results
2017‑18
Actual
results
Difference
(2018‑19
Actual
results minus
2018‑19
Planned
results)
Difference
(2018‑19
Actual
results minus
2017‑18
Planned
results)
Total expenses 5,448,163,000 5,659,513,000 5,649,708,000 211,350,000 9,805,000
Total revenues 1,929,849,000 1,495,858,000 2,288,078,000 (433,991,000) (792,220,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 3,518,314,00 4,163,655,000 3,361,630,000 (645,341,000) (802,025,000)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information 2018‑19 2017‑18 Difference
(2018‑19 minus
2017‑18)
Total net liabilities 1,064,493,000 1,142,859,000 (78,366,000)
Total net financial assets 778,137,000 1,002,694,000 224,557,000
Departmental net debt 286,356,000 140,165,000 146,191,000
Total non-financial assets 1,774,562,000 1,685,657,000 88,905,000
Departmental net financial position 1,488,206,000 1,545,492,000 (57,286,000)

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Commissioner Brenda Lucki

Ministerial Portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling Instruments:

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1873

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

As Canada's national police force, the RCMP is a critical element of the Government of Canada's commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal, and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Mandate and role

The RCMP's mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes: preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries, and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter. Footnote 20

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Throughout 2018‑19, the RCMP has been adapting to a rapidly changing external environment. Based on this operating environment, the context in which both internal and external services were delivered was dynamic.

Externally driven demands continued to expand the scope of the RCMP's mandate, creating new challenges for the RCMP's response to national and global events. In the past year, international political shifts continued to contribute to a surge in asylum seekers and traffic at Canadian borders. Global climate change also increased demands on RCMP personnel and required rapid resource reallocation and response to extreme weather events including floods and fires. Legalization of cannabis and the opioid crisis, particularly synthetic opioids, have had a major impact on front-line policing.

The government's commitment to transparency and accountability has introduced disclosure obligations that must be met in a timely manner. In addition, new class action lawsuits and compliance with terms of agreement in previous lawsuits have driven internal changes. These increased demands were met largely by reallocating resources from other areas.

Internally, a new Commissioner of the RCMP was named and there was significant change within the RCMP's Senior Executive cadre. Alignment with Government of Canada priorities, such as GBA+ and a focus on Indigenous relationships were at the forefront of the RCMP's activities in 2018‑19. A renewed vision with a focus on people, culture, stewardship and policing services was launched and will continue to guide the RCMP toward action, innovation, and modernization through its 150th anniversary.

Key risks

Key Risks
Risks Risk response strategy and effectiveness Link to department's Programs Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or departmental priorities

Resource Alignment Risk

Risk of being unable to effectively sustain responsive resource allocation

Risk of managing reallocation decisions based on the highest priorities

Strengthened governance of the Police Service Agreements

Implemented a model with National Senior Financial Officers with reach to Divisional and Senior management levels within the organization

Targeted recruiting

Re-launched the Experienced Police Officer Program

Overall increase in enrollment at Depot

Program:

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-programs:

4.1.1 Management and Oversight Services

4.1.4 Human Resources Management Services

4.1.5 Financial Management Services

Our People

Our Policing Services

Management of Information Technology Risk

Risk of being unable to sustain operational and administrative requirements, in keeping with the pace of revolutionary advancements in Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT)

Filled Senior positions within the Data Analytics Program

Conducted a review with Gartner Incorporated and implemented some recommendations

Ongoing IM/IT transformation in alignment with Government of Canada direction and priorities

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-programs:

1.2.1 Scientific, Technical and
Investigative Support

4.1.5 Financial Management
Services

4.1.6 Information Management Services

4.1.7 Information Technology Services

Our Stewardship

Our Police Services

Changing Threat Environment Risk

Risk of inadequate situational awareness to make critical operational decisions based on timely and accurate information

Shifting operational realities – such as changing demographics, crime typology, access to new technology, and cyber threats – combined with aging and compartmentalized data warehouses continued to create significant challenges

Established a dedicated team to work with the MMIWG national inquiry

New initiatives toward improved officer safety and Emergency Response Teams

Federal alignment of resources against the highest threats to achieve greatest impact: money laundering and terrorist financing; illegal migration/human smuggling; suspected terrorists; cyber fundamentals; market enforcement; opioids; outlaw motorcycle gangs; and security for G7.

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

2.1. International Policing Operations

Sub-programs:

1.1.1 Contract Policing

1.1.2 Federal Policing

2.1.3 Liaison Mission

Our Police Services

Our People

Management Practices Risk

Given the size, complexity, and diversity of roles employees fill within the organization, those placed in supervisory and management positions may be unable to access timely and consistent learning opportunities and policy support to adequately position them to meet organizational expectations and provide appropriate and timely guidance to employees.

Began partnerships with two police training institutions

Targeted recruiting efforts led to an increase in the number of cadets enrolled at Depot from 1,152 in 2017‑18 to 1,280 in 2018‑19 and an expectation of maintaining 1,280 in 2019-20.

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

2.1 International Policing
Operations

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-program:

4.1.4 Human Resources
Management Services

Our Culture

Our People

The RCMP has a broad mandate to provide international, federal, Indigenous, provincial/territorial, and municipal policing services, all in an environment that is dynamic and increasingly complex. In order to modernize the force and strengthen leadership, work is underway to prepare and better position the RCMP for future challenges. Many initiatives were launched in operations and administratively in support of operations. In light of these efforts, the corporate risk profile is undergoing significant revision.

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower level programs is available on the GC InfoBase. Footnote 21

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the RCMP's website: Footnote 22

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Gender-based analysis plus
  • Response to parliamentary committees and external audits
  • Status report on projects operating with specific Treasury Board approval

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals, and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. Footnote 23 This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information, and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Strategic Policy and Planning Directorate
73 Leikin Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0R2

RPP_DPR-RPP_RMR@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities, and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test, and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions, and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs, and services on diverse groups of women, men, and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018‑19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators, and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments, and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability, and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision, and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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