Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2017‑18 Departmental Results Report

Minister's message


The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am pleased to present to Parliament the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's (RCMP) Departmental Results Report for the period ending March 31, 2018.

As Canada's national police force, and as the provincial local police force in many parts of Canada, the RCMP plays a key role in keeping Canadians safe and safeguarding Canadians' rights and freedoms.

The RCMP has been working in close cooperation with domestic and international partners to combat organized crime, enhance safety in rural communities, stem the flow of illicit substances like fentanyl, and protect Canada from national security threats. The RCMP has also assumed a leadership role to ensure that law enforcement across the country is well-prepared when Canada's new cannabis laws take effect.

In addition, under its new Commissioner, the RCMP is embarking on a process of transformation focused on institutional culture, management practices, workplace wellness, and strengthening relationships with Canadian communities, especially indigenous ones.

I look forward to continuing this important work with Commissioner Lucki and all the dedicated women and men of the RCMP.

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Results at a glance

What funds were used? Actual Spending of $3,210,983,890

Who was involved? 29,555 Full Time Employees

Results Highlights

  • The RCMP engaged in practices that fostered respect and inclusion for Indigenous peoples. The organization invested in employee development of cultural awareness and cultural competency through various forums including: an enhanced cultural awareness curriculum at the RCMP's training academy at Depot Division; new in-service reconciliation training for all employees; a newly developed Indigenous Spiritual Guide; and extended delivery of Aboriginal Perceptions training.
  • In 2017-18, Federal Policing implemented a national operational strategy to target synthetic opioids in an effort to detect, disrupt, and dismantle criminal networks, including the identification and disruption of international synthetic opioid suppliers.
  • In March 2018, the Minister of Public Safety announced the launch of the RCMP's National Missing Persons DNA Program (NMPDP), a new law enforcement tool to support missing persons and unidentified remains investigations across Canada.
  • Subject matter experts and new centralized resources were established to support the advancement of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+), gender equality, diversity, inclusion, and cultural transformation. GBA+ was used in the RCMP to identify barriers to diversity throughout the career pipeline, in uniform policies and procedures, as well as to identify systemic issues in low-diversity units.

For more information on the RCMP's plans, priorities, and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

As Canada's national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is a critical element of the Government of Canada's commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal, and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Mandate and role

The RCMP's mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes: preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries, and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

For more general information about the department, see the "Supplementary information" section of this report. For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter. Footnote 1

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

The RCMP operates in a complex and rapidly expanding environment. A number of internal risks have been identified and are being addressed; however, significant external risks remain that may impact the RCMP's ability to meet its outcomes. The risks identified in the Corporate Risk Profile are described below.

The external environment brought increased challenges in the form of floods and wildfires, protests related to natural resources, and political changes that resulted in an increase in asylum seekers at Canadian borders. Vulnerable sectors – including Indigenous peoples, women, and rural communities – have brought additional unique challenges to front-line policing.

Sophisticated organized crime, enabled by technology, has grown exponentially, thereby increasing demands on the RCMP. Legal and regulatory changes, such as the legalization of cannabis and the Jordan decision on the timeframes for production of evidence, have changed efficiency requirements and could potentially jeopardize cases.

Fighting the ever-expanding scope and sophistication of crime depends upon reliable and efficient information. Outdated technology and a lack of data interoperability have created significant challenges.

Federal and Contract Policing bear a large part of the burden from these aforementioned challenges. Supervisory support in both areas have affected the quality of investigations. What is more, resourcing and pay rates appear to have played a significant role in the RCMP's ability to recruit and retain a trained and capable workforce.

Preparation for both the pending unionization of members and the transition of civilian members to the public service have added complexity to the operating environment. In addition, legal action and media reports have refocused attention on building a respectful workforce that is inclusive and free from harassment.

Key risks

Key Risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department's Programs Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or departmental priorities

Resource Alignment Risk

Risk of being unable to effectively sustain responsive resource allocation

Risk of managing reallocation decisions based on the highest priorities

Internal processes have strengthened the governance of the Police Service Agreements (PSAs). Quarterly teleconferences to discuss current issues have ensured consistent application of the terms of the PSAs between clients and representatives at the provincial and National Headquarters (NHQ) level. The Contract Management Committee was instrumental in discussing current issues pertaining to the PSAs. This included exploring ways to improve engagement on various initiatives that may have a financial and/or operational impact.

The National Senior Financial Officers (NSFO) model was fully implemented in 2016-17. NSFOs and their teams were engaged with national programs at both the working level and at the senior management level, ensuring that proper financial support and strategic advice was continually provided. The NSFO teams continued to evolve to ensure proper financial support, advice, and input was provided on Memoranda to Cabinet/Treasury Board Submissions, Senior Executive Committee briefings, and external Federal/Provincial/Territorial committee meetings, etc. In addition, NHQ Financial Management, working collaboratively with divisional finance, structured its internal and external reporting procedures around the NSFO model.

Program:

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-programs:

4.1.1 Management and Oversight Services

4.1.4 Human Resources Management Services

4.1.5 Financial Management Services

RCMP priorities:

Service

Engagement

Management of Information Technology Risk

Risk of being unable to sustain operational and administrative requirements, in keeping with the pace of revolutionary advancements in Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT)

Senior vacancies within the IM/IT Program were filled, which brought stability to the Program. IM/IT transformation was re-energized following the results of an independent review into the Business Value of IT (BVIT) conducted by Gartner Incorporated.

The IM/IT transformation program focused on the following areas to improve service to the public safety community, while simultaneously responding to Government of Canada direction and priorities as they related to enterprise IM/IT practices, standards, and solutions:

  • Improved communication, enterprise standards, policies and directives; and,
  • Informed and streamlined decision-making and consistent processes and procedures including those related to human resources management (staffing, and classification).

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-programs:

1.2.1 Scientific, Technical and
Investigative Support

4.1.5 Financial Management
Services

4.1.6 Information Management Services

4.1.7 Information Technology Services

RCMP priorities:

Service

Innovation

Changing Threat Environment Risk

Risk of inadequate situational awareness to make critical operational decisions based on timely and accurate information

Shifting operational realities – such as changing demographics, crime typology, access to new technology, and cyber threats – combined with aging and compartmentalized data warehouses continued to create significant challenges.

Contract and Aboriginal Policing released a document entitled "Working Together to End Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls: National Scan of RCMP Initiatives". This scan focused on prevention, awareness, and policing activities.

National Aboriginal Policing and Crime Prevention Services continued to consult with vulnerable communities, with visits to "F" Division, Saskatchewan, and "G" Division, Northwest Territories.

Additional training by the Community Conflict Management Group was rolled out in several provinces.

Federal Policing continued to focus on prevention to mitigate risks by raising awareness, enhancing engagement, strengthening relationships, and building law enforcement knowledge and awareness to proactively identify issues.

Federal Policing realignment resulted in three new areas of focus:

  1. NHQ Federal Policing National Security Intervention team;
  2. First Responder Terrorism Awareness Program; and,
  3. Federal Policing Prevention and Engagement team.

Federal Policing continued to counter terrorism in the criminal space, as well as the pre-criminal space, using outreach, engagement, and intervention work to counter radicalization to violence.

Modernization of the International Policing Operations Program continued, in an effort to leverage the RCMP's international strengths and support Canadian law enforcement priorities and objectives. There was continued focus on increasing the RCMP's global visibility, influence, and reach.

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

2.1. International Policing Operations

Sub-programs:

1.1.1 Contract Policing

1.1.2 Federal Policing

2.1.3 Liaison Mission

RCMP priority:

Service

Management Practices Risk

Given the size, complexity, and diversity of roles employees fill within the organization, those placed in supervisory and management positions may be unable to access timely and consistent learning opportunities and policy support to adequately position them to meet organizational expectations and provide appropriate and timely guidance to employees.

As a response to the pressures faced by members in supervisory and management positions due to inadequate staffing levels, the RCMP ramped up recruitment to increase the number of trained police officers. In 2016-17, the RCMP enrolled 1,088 cadets at the RCMP Training Academy ("Depot"), a significant increase (175%) since 2012-13 when 395 cadets were enrolled. It is estimated that in fiscal year 2017-18, the RCMP will enroll 1,152 cadets to Depot.

The RCMP's core leadership and management programs were evaluated and adjusted. Policies were updated to make leadership training mandatory for new corporals and sergeants. The Canadian Police College partnered with several universities to formally recognize RCMP leadership programs.

An interdepartmental project group was established to respond to the Supreme Court decision on unionization. Bill C-7 amended the Public Service Labour Relations Act (PSLRA) to take into account the specific circumstances of RCMP regular members and reservists, in an effort to provide them with the ability to pursue their interests through collective bargaining.

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement
Services

2.1 International Policing
Operations

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-program:

4.1.4 Human Resources
Management Services

RCMP priorities:

Service

Innovation

Engagement

Accountability

The RCMP has a broad mandate to provide international, federal, Indigenous, provincial/territorial, and municipal policing services, all in an environment that is dynamic and increasingly complex. Furthermore, the changing threat environment exponentially increased policing challenges. Crime has rapidly evolved, with new technologies that have further enabled sophisticated organized crime groups. Vulnerable Canadians were exposed to new threats; as such, the RCMP realigned its programs to focus on this new reality. IM/IT transformation was also critical, strengthening business intelligence through improved data holdings and interoperability of databases to help front-line officers.

Extreme weather events heightened demands for the rapid reallocation of resources. Vacancy patterns continued to be addressed, and a joint Human Resources/Finance committee helped senior executives manage resources by integrating perspectives from these two key business lines.

Finally, the RCMP continued to go through a leadership transition period. Key risks in governance and strategy were identified. Addressing workforce culture was recognized as a fundamental pillar to adapt and evolve. The RCMP continued to address matters related to gender, sexual orientation, harassment, equity, and inclusivity, while also continuing to work towards the elimination of harassment and discrimination from the workplace. A dedicated unit has been tasked with leading cultural change, including the implementation of GBA+.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Police Operations

Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program provides Canadians with policing services at the federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal levels, as well as within Indigenous communities. As described in the RCMP Act, these services include all duties that are assigned to peace officers in relation to: the preservation of the peace, the prevention of crime and offences against the laws of Canada and the laws in force in any province/territory in which they may be employed, and the apprehension of criminals, offenders and others who may be lawfully taken into custody; the execution of all warrants, and performance of all duties and services in relation thereto, that may, under the RCMP Act or the laws of Canada or the laws in force in any province/territory, be lawfully executed and performed by peace officers; and, the performance of other duties and functions as are prescribed by the Governor in Council or the Commissioner. This Program contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities delivered by employees of the RCMP to the public, businesses, and other agencies/organizations within Canada. The RCMP's education and awareness activities – such as information sessions on crime prevention, national security, financial crime, and drugs and organized crime – are aimed at reducing victimization of Canadians. This Program also ensures the protection of designated persons and security at major events, which in turn mitigates any potential threats to Canada's population. Finally, this Program delivers a high level of technical and operational support to the Canadian law enforcement community. Taken together, these activities ensure the RCMP reaches its overarching goal of reducing criminal activity affecting Canadians.

Results

Contract Policing

Several initiatives were implemented throughout the year to support a reduction in the rate and severity level of crime in RCMP jurisdictions. Emphasis was placed on enhanced policing services, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, and support for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG).

Enhanced Policing Services

The RCMP continued to develop and implement national policies and procedures to govern contracted enforcement activities. This included:

  • Providing national coordination, expertise, and leadership on effective ways to increase community safety and well-being
  • Preventing, reducing, and intervening on crimes by focusing on risk factors before criminal activity takes place
  • Promoting crime prevention practices
  • Developing and modifying policy, training, equipment, and best practices

In support of policy and training, the RCMP delivered new conflict resolution training to facilitate the prevention and resolution of disorder, with a group of specially trained officers providing support and expertise to build understanding and relationships between police and stakeholders.

The Program also continued to implement an impaired driving strategy, with emphasis on increasing officer capacity and ability to detect, articulate, and form reasonable grounds for the enforcement of drug impaired driving. Moreover, the RCMP worked with Public Safety to implement a pilot project on oral fluid devices. The pilot's four main objectives were to:

  • Examine the use of oral fluid drug screening devices in the Canadian climate
  • Inform law enforcement training guidelines for device use
  • Inform police standard operating procedures for device use
  • Identify possible elements for inclusion as standards for the devices

During the project, which ran from December 2016 to March 2017, 1,141 oral fluid samples from drivers across Canada were voluntarily collected by the RCMP and partner agencies including the Vancouver Police Department, the Halifax Regional Police, the Toronto Police Service, the Gatineau Police Service, and the Ontario Provincial Police. Upon analysis, it was found that the devices were relatively easy to use and withstood a variety of weather, temperature, and lighting conditions. The RCMP will continue research into these devices prior to full implementation across Canada.

The RCMP continued to enhance policing services offered to Indigenous communities and Indigenous peoples under the terms of Community Tripartite Agreements and the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP), by working with provincial and federal government representatives in the development of dedicated policing services for their communities.

The RCMP also focused on developing and evaluating practical and culturally competent policing services, in consultation with Indigenous organizations. Education tools were developed to increase awareness and to ensure that policies and programs were reflective of the needs of Indigenous peoples. Proactive and preventive programs specific to Indigenous communities were developed and delivered; for example, the RCMP supported 23 projects in Indigenous communities across Canada under the Family Violence Initiative Fund to reduce the impact of family violence. What is more, the recruitment of Indigenous peoples was promoted and encouraged throughout the RCMP.

Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples

The RCMP's National Aboriginal Policing Services took important steps to build on the RCMP's shared history with Canada's Indigenous peoples to promote continued partnerships centred on mutual trust, respect, and understanding. Reconciliation efforts through community-driven activities and corporate-led partnerships initiated a path to change.

Administrative changes were made in support of these efforts, which included employing five divisional RCMP Métis coordinators who work directly with communities. Several new policies were created or supported including: the Inuusivat Anninaqtuq (suicide prevention) Action Plan 2017-22 for Nunavut; the Restorative Justice Referral Mechanism; Missing Persons Intake and Risk Assessment Forms; and a relationship-building protocol. A Memorandum of Understanding on Indigenous Artifacts of Métis Origin was signed, leading to the return of items to the Manitoba Métis Federation and the Métis National Council. A full-time liaison position was created with the Native Women's Association of Canada and a full-time liaison position was also staffed with the Assembly of First Nations. The RCMP actively participated at formal meetings with advisory groups for national Indigenous organizations and supported the RCMP Circle for Change Indigenous Advisory Committee.

Reconciliation was demonstrated through concrete actions, such as the Eagle Feather Protocol, whereby victims, witnesses, suspects, and police officers were provided with the option to swear legal oaths on an eagle feather. The RCMP also participated with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada in five community engagement sessions on the application of the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, which validated the RCMP Resource Guide for members to identify and further develop their understanding of responsibilities in relation to the Act.

Support for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The RCMP established a dedicated inquiry team to provide full cooperation and participation to the MMIWG national inquiry. Throughout the reporting year, the team responded to requests from the national inquiry; managed the retention of all MMIWG-related documents; listened to public testimony from families and survivors; conducted analyses; prepared documents for senior executives for RCMP testimony; and provided documents as evidence to the inquiry.

Since July 2017, the RCMP has reviewed investigative files for disclosure to the national inquiry; to date, a total of 47 files had or are undergoing redaction. The RCMP also worked closely with the Department of Justice-funded Family Information Liaison Units in every province and territory to meet with families and answer questions stemming from sudden deaths, homicide, and missing persons' investigations. The RCMP has so far received 74 requests in relation to 63 individual victims, with a date range starting from the 1950s to the present day.

National report to end violence against Indigenous Women and Girls

In May 2017, the RCMP published a report entitled "Working Together to End Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls: National Scan of RCMP initiatives". While the report is focused on Indigenous issues, many of the initiatives are not Indigenous-specific. The report has been made available on the RCMP's website. Footnote 2

Federal Policing

Federal Policing continued its efforts to align its resources against the highest threats in order to achieve the greatest impact, while modernizing and diversifying its workforce to address the current and future criminal threat landscape. To this end, Federal Policing implemented an innovative approach to prioritize its investigative work and to ensure that Federal resources are utilized only on those files and major projects that fall within the Federal mandate.

In 2017-18, the Program conducted investigations, developed and shared intelligence, supported prevention and engagement efforts, and enhanced policy and capacity development with respect to its priority areas, specifically: money laundering / terrorist financing; illegal migration/human smuggling; suspected terrorists; cyber fundamentals; market enforcement; opioids; outlaw motorcycle gangs; and, security for Canada's G7 Presidency Year. Footnote 3

Money Laundering / Terrorist Financing

The RCMP continued to work with key partners in government and the private sector to identify and investigate money laundering and terrorist financing. The following are two success stories:

  • In one investigation, 16 charges were laid and approximately $1.07 million in bulk cash was seized; and,
  • In another investigation, an individual was arrested and charged with fraud and money laundering exceeding $3 million in a file in which over 100 false identities were used to obtain credit cards and other loans from Canadian financial institutions.

The RCMP also worked to address gaps in Canada's anti-money laundering regime, identified by the Financial Action Task Force, Footnote 4 by leading a Canada-wide effort to create a coordinated model between criminal asset recovery and civil asset recovery. This model will help ensure that all options are explored to disrupt the ability of criminals to profit from their crimes.

Federal investigators also examined financial elements of all terrorism-related investigations to identify possible crimes involving terrorist financing.

Illegal Migration / Human Smuggling

During the reporting period, the RCMP intercepted and conducted preliminary assessments on 20,593 people seeking asylum by entering Canada from the United States. The RCMP also continued to generate operational intelligence pertaining to international human trafficking affecting Canada. For example, in 2017-18 an intelligence file related to human trafficking for sexual exploitation was transitioned to an RCMP operational unit for enforcement as it had a nexus to China and operated inter-provincially across Canada.

Suspected Terrorists

The RCMP continued to focus its efforts on two key elements: risk assessments; and techniques to address mobilization to terrorism and national security threats. Through the First Responder Terrorism Awareness Program, the RCMP helped enhance front-line knowledge and awareness of violent extremism and terrorism. In partnership with relevant departments and agencies, the RCMP also implemented measures to effectively manage the return of high-risk travellers, while continuing to work on identifying solutions to address enforcement gaps and challenges. While the RCMP's primary focus continues to be on the threat of terrorism, efforts continued on combatting foreign actor interference activities including espionage and counter-proliferation. The RCMP continued to improve its operational capacity through the development of specialized resources and enhanced engagement with law enforcement across Canada.

Cyber Fundamentals

The RCMP continued to play an active role in the government's Cyber Security Review – which included an examination of capacity challenges facing law enforcement – and had operational success in the identification and investigation of cybercrimes impacting Canadians. This success is demonstrated in the following examples:

  • The RCMP worked with domestic and international partners to identify prolific foreign-based cybercriminals targeting Canadians and other victims around the world.
  • Cybercrime charges were laid in several criminal investigations including against one Canadian for compromising a computer in a campaign attempting to erode confidence in the cyber security industry that plays a critical role in securing cyber-systems. In a separate investigation another Canadian was charged with the possession and sale of approximately three billion personal identity records.
  • While investigating the most harmful cybercriminals affecting Canada, the RCMP was able to obtain malware and compromised account information and bring it to the attention of Canadian businesses to help them mitigate harm and protect customers.
Market Enforcement

The RCMP continued to work with partners to identify and investigate crimes in relation to financial securities and the capital markets through Integrated Market Enforcement Teams. The following are examples of successful initiatives:

  • In an investigation that began in 2003, a Chief Executive Officer and company lawyer were found guilty in 2018 for their roles in the $31 million fraud involving stock-price manipulation that artificially maintained share prices of a Halifax tech company. The fraud ultimately destroyed the company and a union pension fund.
  • In another investigation, involving a scheme to artificially inflate the price of stocks, charges were laid against 11 individuals for fraud, possession of proceeds of crime, laundering proceeds of crime, as well as criminal organization charges. The three primary subjects pleaded guilty in December 2017 and received various sentences in January 2018.
  • In an investigation under the Investment Canada Act to determine whether foreign investments could be injurious to Canada's national security, an Order-in-Council was issued requiring the divestiture of a component of critical transportation infrastructure that had been acquired by a Russian group with ties to organized crime.
  • The Program provided the Ontario Securities Commission with an intelligence assessment that brought to light organized crime affiliations and fraudulent business practices of a company intending to be listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, effectively preventing the company from launching an initial public offering.
Opioids

The RCMP introduced a variety of initiatives to counteract the nature and scope of the illicit manufacturing and trafficking of opioids (e.g., fentanyl). In 2017-18, Federal Policing, in conjunction with Contract and Aboriginal Policing, conducted research on the effectiveness of equipping operational RCMP officers with Naloxone. As a result, it was decided to distribute Naloxone kits to all of the front-line officers. Naloxone proved to be a very effective opioid antidote with most recipients showing marked improvement shortly after administration; in fact, over 95% of those administered Naloxone were alive when they left police care.

Moreover, an Organized Crime Joint Operations Centre was established to collect and analyze information on synthetic opioid and precursor importation to Canada in an effort to establish trends and identify enforcement opportunities for investigators. Several operational successes related to opioids occurred in 2017-18 including the largest fentanyl pill seizure in Canada (128,846 fentanyl pills) and the dismantling of a complex clandestine drug lab which was using new techniques to produce illicit drugs. The RCMP, with counterparts from the United States and Mexico, also completed a trilateral threat assessment on opioid trafficking in North America to establish common baseline understanding and identify areas for potential coordination.

Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

Outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMG) continued to operate in a variety of criminal enterprises that put community safety at risk. In terms of OMGs, the Hells Angels remained the most pervasive and interconnected cluster of groups in the Canadian organized crime landscape. In response, the RCMP continued to advance the national strategy on outlaw motorcycle gangs, with an emphasis on the Hells Angels. It is within this context that the Canadian Integrated Response to Organized Crime (CIROC) committee played a significant role. In spring 2017, on behalf of CIROC, the RCMP developed a framework for use by the Canadian law enforcement community in order to advance provincial/municipal response strategies to mitigate the OMG threat. The framework was completed and provided to all CIROC members.

G7 Security for Canada's Presidency Year

In January 2018, Canada assumed the Presidency of the G7. While the G7 Summit took place outside the reporting period, much work related to operational planning and security mobilization was completed in 2017-18. The RCMP's Protective Policing Program enhanced its capacity to meet operational demand, based on an anticipated increase in major events and Canadian executives travelling abroad.

Technical Services and Operational Support

National Cyber Security Strategy

In 2017-18, the Government of Canada introduced a new National Cyber Security Strategy, which created the National Cybercrime Coordination (NC3) Unit as a National Police Service within the RCMP. Once implemented, the NC3 will coordinate Canadian police operations against cybercriminals, produce actionable cybercrime intelligence, and establish a national mechanism for Canadians and businesses to report cybercrimes to police. During the reporting period, the Program consulted with the policing community to design a sound model as it prepares for full operating capability by 2022-23.

Building Core Technical Capabilities

The rapid evolution of communications technology continued to present technical challenges to the RCMP's ability to lawfully intercept communications and obtain digital evidence and data, which in turn impeded criminal and national security investigations. In 2016-17, Technical Services and Operations Support received a total of 4,365 electronic devices for forensic extraction and analysis of data in support of investigations – a slight increase over the previous reporting cycle.

The speed at which technology changed and new hardware and software products were made available to the public resulted in an increase in the number of devices received for which no forensically sound solutions for data extraction existed. In addition, funding limitations for core technical investigative capabilities within the RCMP limited the Program's ability to maintain internal capacity to develop new solutions as needs arose. To mitigate the impact of these issues, the Program collaborated regularly with domestic and international partners to share resources and collectively develop operationally and forensically sound solutions wherever possible. As a result of these efforts, a total of 715 new tools, techniques, and/or solutions were developed, co-developed, and acquired in 2017-18 through research and development investments.

Multinational Police Investigation

The RCMP played an essential role in an international operation led by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to dismantle a Canada-based company, Phantom Secure Communications Inc., which supplied encrypted communications services to organized crime markets around the world. The RCMP assisted international partners with the execution of multiple search warrants, seizing more than 1,000 encrypted mobile devices, computers, servers, and corporate documents. The RCMP is working with the FBI to ensure that evidence seized in Canada can be legally shared and used in the prosecution of Phantom's owner. Footnote 5

Protecting Government Facilities and Assets

In response to the evaluation of the CBRN Response Capability conducted by the RCMP's National Program Evaluation Services, significant changes were made to internal reporting structures to improve overall effectiveness. As of 2017-18, the RCMP's entire response capability for incidents involving CBRN and Explosives (CBRNE) was concentrated under one area of responsibility including technical expertise in each threat and weapon type, field forensic services, and first responder programs. Further improvements will continue, in an effort to align specialized response units and to create a single point of contact for all CBRNE operations that require RCMP assistance.

The RCMP's Protective Technical Services continued to seek innovative ways to leverage technology to protect government facilities such as Parliament Hill and the Prime Minister's Residence. Installations and investments were made throughout the year to maintain and upgrade existing technology infrastructure at both locations to ensure consistent delivery of electronic and physical security systems.

Results achieved
Expected result Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
The rate and severity level of crime is reduced Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's contribution to a safe and secure Canada" 80% March 31, 2018 77% 80% N/A Footnote 6
Reduction in the severity level of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 96 March 31, 2018 101.05 100.32 100.22
Reduction in the per capita rate of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 8,854 March 31, 2018 8,592.08 8,679.43 7,247.24
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
1,628,412,337 2,100,223,111 2,060,235,127 1,891,655,870 (208,567,241)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
22,470 22,391 (79)

Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Description

This Program provides the Canadian law enforcement community with the necessary scientific, technical, investigative, and educational support to deliver proactive, intelligence-based policing and law enforcement services to their respective communities and partners. Additionally, this Program provides educational opportunities to members of the Canadian law enforcement community to enable them to develop their skills, thus increasing their effectiveness in contributing to a safer Canada.

Results

Enhancing Forensic Science and Identification Capacity

The RCMP continued to implement the government's Biometric Expansion Project to process over 11 million transactions in support of Canada's immigration program. This included enrollments through immigration applications, international immigration information sharing, and identity verifications for all biometrically enrolled immigrants arriving in Canada. Efforts were focused on ensuring the RCMP had sufficient resources in place to manage the workload that was and will continue to be generated by these new transactions, all while maintaining current service standards.

In 2017-18, the Canadian Law Enforcement Services Program completed its implementation of the Criminal Justice Information Modernization (CJIM) project, a national solution for electronic court dispositions. Access to this electronic solution was deployed to over 1,500 law enforcement agencies, allowing them to update criminal records in real time. In addition, following significant focused efforts by the Program, all previously backlogged criminal records related to serious, violent, and sex offences were processed, with efforts continuing to eliminate the remaining backlog.

In addition to this electronic advancement, the RCMP's Integrated Forensic Identification Services (IFIS), which is responsible for field and crime scene forensic evidence processing, worked to expedite the flow of forensic intelligence to front-line investigators. As of 2017-18, IFIS began relaying finger and palm print matches directly from their databases to investigators responsible for each case. The automation of this intelligence delivery was expected to increase the speed with which investigators can pursue new leads and to support grounds for arrests and judicial authorizations. IFIS also explored software modernization in the areas of latent fingerprint examinations, with the goal of improving workflows and the efficiency with which forensic evidence is processed, thereby enhancing court disclosure documentation.

The Canadian Police Information (CPI) Centre Footnote 7 continued to provide functional guidance and oversight for its national information sharing tools. These tools provided secure, timely, and accurate criminal justice and public safety information to Canadian and international law enforcement agencies, as well as domestic agencies having a role complimentary to, and in support of, law enforcement. In 2017-18, the CPIC system was queried an average of 800,000 times per day by these agencies. As part of its governance modernization, the CPI Centre completed phase one of its quality assurance review of information shared on the CPIC system by police agencies. The review will improve the quality of information available on the system and, as such, will increase police safety.

In support of the government's commitment to stop the flow of illegal handguns and assault weapons, the Firearms and Toolmark Identification Section, under National Forensic Laboratory Services (NFLS), initiated a pilot project with a major municipal police agency to assess ways to expedite uploads into the Canadian Integrated Ballistics Identification Network (CIBIN). This initiative was intended to train and involve local police agencies to obtain images of test fires from seized firearms and cartridge cases collected from crime scenes. The scanned images would then be sent to the Canadian Firearms Program to correlate and compare to holdings in CIBIN, allowing immediate determination as to whether any links exist to unsolved cases within the network. By inviting front-line investigators to participate in the process at the onset, the RCMP is aiming to use the results from the pilot project to reduce turnaround times for reporting CIBIN results to partner agencies.

Biology Services at NFLS initiated early phases of research into a new type of DNA testing using massively parallel sequencing (MPS), also known as next generation sequencing (NGS). The RCMP acquired an MPS instrument to interrogate hundreds of regions of DNA at the same time. Research and validation is ongoing, with the objective of providing clients with investigative information on physical appearance (e.g., hair and eye colour prediction) and bio-geographic ancestry (major population groups for ethnicity prediction) of DNA samples of unknown origin, and to later expand that service to include information on identity (e.g., autosomal DNA and chromosome Y).

Protecting Vulnerable Canadians

In March 2018, the Minister of Public Safety announced the launch of the RCMP's National Missing Persons DNA Program (NMPDP), a new law enforcement tool to support missing persons and unidentified remains investigations across Canada. The announcement also noted that the National DNA Databank (NDDB) would receive biological samples and DNA profiles for this humanitarian purpose. The NDDB achieved a milestone during the reporting period, with more than 50,000 DNA matches since its inception. Moreover, within three weeks of the launch of the NMPDP, five new DNA samples were submitted for the purpose of searching against missing person and unidentified remain profiles. Since then, two identifications were made that would not have been possible prior to the development of this program.

Efforts were also focused on providing operational support to investigations and updating technological tools including the Missing Children/Persons and Unidentified Remains database, the Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System, and the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) database. A modernized version of the NSOR database was under development to address amendments recently made to the Sex Offender Information Registration Act, to focus on: the increasing number of registered sex offenders; new offender reporting obligations; and new information-sharing requirements with key law enforcement partners. In tandem with this modernization, significant efforts were made to improve the overall functionality and quality of information contained within the current NSOR database. On the operational side, the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre received 38,648 requests, complaints, and reports for assistance, an increase of approximately 16.5% when compared to the previous reporting cycle. Despite this significant increase, the Program provided 3,127 investigational packages to police agencies of jurisdictions, a slight decrease (8%) when compared to results from 2016-17.

National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre

The National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre led victim identification efforts in an investigation involving an Ontario elementary school bus driver. Following the discovery of new online child sexual exploitation materials uploaded on a computer network that allowed users to conceal their identities and activities, investigators narrowed the location of the videos to London, Ontario, using groundbreaking victim identification techniques. A subsequent investigation was initiated by the London Police Services that led to a search of the bus driver's electronic devices and the discovery of numerous child sexual exploitation videos and images, including those that had been created on the school bus. Numerous children were safeguarded in these efforts. The perpetrator pleaded guilty to 23 charges, including voyeurism, as well as possessing, distributing, and making child pornography.

Criminal Use of Firearms and Gang Violence

During the reporting period, the Government of Canada established the Initiative to Take Action Against Guns and Gangs, a multi-pronged approach to tackle gun and gang activity in Canada. The initiative will:

  • Bring together federal, provincial, and territorial efforts to support community-level prevention and enforcement efforts;
  • Build and leverage unique federal expertise and resources to advance intelligence and law enforcement related to the trafficking of firearms; and,
  • Invest in border security to interdict illicit goods including guns and drugs.
Law Enforcement Capacities

The Canadian Police College (CPC) hosted an international masterclass program on policing in the context of security sector reform, bringing together senior police professionals representing nine countries. Participants took part in an intensive, interactive program designed to enhance the effectiveness of senior police officials to act as advisors to initiatives in post-conflict environments or in transitional, organizational development contexts. As public safety and security extend beyond national boundaries, the masterclass focused on bringing policing professionals together to enhance leadership skills in police reform.

In addition, the CPC's academic standards and learning department began a review of all courses to ensure that they reflected the values and objectives of GBA+. What is more, the college founded an innovation working group to:

  • Assess the College's needs and impact of proposed innovative technology projects and expenditures;
  • Provide research and analysis on new and ongoing innovative technology projects, while recommending priorities to the CPC Executive Team for investment and training improvements; and,
  • Track progress and monitoring for all ongoing projects.

Lastly, the CPC administered a "Guarding Minds at Work" survey to its employees to assess and address psychological health and safety in the workplace. Since then, a wellness action plan was implemented to address strengths and weaknesses that require attention and improvement.

Providing Actionable Intelligence

The Criminal Intelligence Service of Canada (CISC) continued to produce its flagship documents: the National Threat Assessment on Serious and Organized Crime (NTA) and the National Criminal Intelligence Estimate on the Criminal Markets (NCIE). These reports received positive feedback from senior law enforcement officials across Canada, and were used as foundational documents for annual target-setting exercises. In support of an open and transparent government, CISC released a public version of the NCIE. A public version of the NTA, as well as other information documents on organized crime and the criminal markets, are under development and will be published online.

Results achieved
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual result
2016-17
Actual result
2015-16
Actual result
Technical, forensic, investigative, and educational activities support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "overall the RCMP provides high quality service" 80% March 31, 2018 78% 76% N/A Footnote 8
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
193,627,855 193,627,855 208,944,628 182,370,525 (11,257,330)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
1,409 1,273 (136)

International Policing Operations

Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program furthers Canada's global peace and security agenda by cooperating with and supporting the international law enforcement community, thereby ensuring that both Canadians and the global community are safer. This Program addresses the transnational scope of crime by building relationships with international policing partners and by participating in the INTERPOL global information sharing network. Additionally, the RCMP actively participates in multiple missions abroad in a peacekeeping role and provides support to nations at risk to build their law enforcement capacity.

Results

The RCMP focused its international law enforcement efforts on advancing domestic police operations through enhanced visibility, reach, and influence abroad; capacity building; and supporting Canadian international peace operations.

Advancing Operations

The RCMP reviewed its domestic and international partnerships to identify gaps and opportunities to support law enforcement cooperation, while ensuring alignment with RCMP international law enforcement priorities. Awareness and outreach activities were conducted with Canadian law enforcement services to provide information on RCMP programs and services that could be leveraged to support their operations.

Furthermore, the RCMP assessed its global footprint to ensure that it was appropriately positioned to meet future policing requirements. In 2017-18, cooperation and information sharing continued with EUROPOL, and the RCMP maintained a leadership role in INTERPOL, especially in the Americas region.

Engagement with international law enforcement partners, including through programs involving the RCMP's Liaison Officers and criminal analysts deployed abroad, was critical to the advancement of many of the RCMP's domestic criminal investigations into cybercrime, national security, serious and organized crime, and financial crime. The RCMP also assisted international partners in their investigations, leading to the disruption of international criminal activity in Canadian society. For example, the RCMP worked with the United States Drug Enforcement Agency to interdict a water vessel, which led to the seizure of approximately 800 kilograms of cocaine.

Capacity Building

With funding from Canada's Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program and the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program, the RCMP planned and delivered sustainable capacity building programming in several countries including Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Tanzania, and Turkey. Through these programs, the RCMP contributed to global stability by developing and promoting initiatives that addressed transnational crime and counter-terrorism issues.

International Peace Operations

The RCMP managed the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations Program, supporting the Government of Canada's engagement in the United Nations and in other peace efforts, which included assessing and recommending international police peace operations for Canadian participation. Canadian police assisted in building and strengthening law-enforcement capacity in fragile and conflict-affected areas with the deployment of 47 Canadian police officers to locations around the world, including Haiti, Iraq, Ukraine, and the West Bank.

In 2017-18, the Program began a review of its assessment and reporting tools, which included GBA+ considerations. Canadian police officers traveled to the Republic of Senegal to provide training to a United Nations (UN) all-female per-selection assistance and assessment team, which prepared female police officers for testing to qualify for UN peacekeeping operations. In addition, training was provided in Haiti and Ukraine on gender mainstreaming and sexual and gender-based violence, as well as workshops on gender and violent crime. As part of the mission to Ukraine, the RCMP also participated in working groups on gender violence and law enforcement, cooperated with the Organizational for Security and Co-operation in Europe on a Ukrainian-led project to target domestic violence, and supported the European Union Advisory Mission Gender Focal Point Project.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Police cooperation and support is provided to the international law enforcement community to help create a safer and more stable environment Percentage of international engagements and deployments that are in line with RCMP international law enforcement priorities 80% March 31, 2018 100% 89% 93.3%
Canadian police deployed internationally have the specific skills and knowledge required to carry out their mission/operation Percentage of participants who strongly agree or agree with the statement "as a result of pre-deployment mission training, I have the skills and knowledge I require to carry out my mission/operation" 80% March 31, 2018 80.25% 90.5% 95.5%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
53,067,195 53,067,195 69,115,118 43,542,013 (9,525,182)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
158 173 15

Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

Description

In order to enhance the RCMP's internationally recognized image, reputation, and rich heritage, this Program works to promote the positive image of the RCMP while building relationships with domestic and international law enforcement, government, and community partners. The Program provides advice and analysis to internal and external clients regarding appropriate ceremonial features of special events and occurrences (e.g., the Olympics, Expos, Summits, and at funerals for police officers). These clients include federal, provincial, and municipal partners, academic institutions, Royal Household representatives, and non-government organizations. Through the activities of this Program, the RCMP contributes to Canada's vibrant culture and heritage.

Results

Partnerships

The Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program played a vital role in the promotion of law enforcement and community policing. As a nationally and internationally recognized symbol of Canada, the RCMP participated with partners and stakeholders on a variety of initiatives throughout the reporting period including:

  • A renewed ceremonial partnership with the Governor General and Rideau Hall;
  • Assistance at events led by Global Affairs Canada and Canadian Heritage; and,
  • Support for Veterans Affairs Canada and the Department of National Defence at the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
Community Events

The Program undertook a cross-country tour in support of Canada's 150th anniversary. In 2017-18, the Musical Ride offered 47 performances in all 10 provinces and in the Yukon Territory. The performances helped raise over $695,000, funds which were reinvested by the hosts in their respective communities.

Moreover, the Musical Ride, in partnership with the Ontario Provincial Police, Canada Border Services Agency, Ottawa Fire Services, and the Governor General's Foot Guards, hosted its annual open house in February 2018. The free event welcomed 12,000 people and collected over 4,755 pounds of food and $6,030, all of which was donated to the Ottawa Food Bank.

Respectful Workplace

During the fiscal year, the Musical Ride conducted a respectful workplace review. Employees at all levels were interviewed and a report with five recommendations was provided to senior management. Since then, all recommendations have been implemented, related to: leadership; engagement; communication; training; and support for ongoing learning and career development. The Program will continue to prioritize a healthy workplace culture that is free of harassment and welcoming to all employment groups.

Results achieved
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual result
2016-17
Actual result
2015-16
Actual result
The RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada Percentage of respondents who were satisfied with RCMP representation at international events 80% March 31, 2018 N/A Footnote 9 N/A Footnote 10 N/A Footnote 11
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
11,604,175 11,604,175 12,882,134 14,147,947 2,543,772
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
96 86 (10)

Transfer Payments

Description

This Program ensures that RCMP employees and their families are provided income security at their pension or in the event of disability or death, and that an appropriate level of support is afforded to those who are affected by circumstances beyond their control and as a result of their employment with the RCMP. The activities within this Program are either regulated by the terms and conditions of the grant or are statutory payments, for example, the RCMP Pension Continuation Act payments.

Results

Results achieved
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual result
2016-17
Actual result
2015-16
Actual result
Claims and inquiries are processed within established service standards Percentage of claims and enquiries processed in accordance with established service standards 80% March 31, 2018 N/A Footnote 12 N/A Footnote 13 N/A Footnote 14
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
218,086,483 224,013,665 225,366,241 223,026,852 (986,813)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
0 0 0

Information on the RCMP's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote 15

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

Priorities and experimentation in Human Resources

In 2017-18, Human Resources focused on several critical initiatives: Footnote 16

  • Health Modernization: Efforts continued on the implementation of the Mental Health Strategy (2014-19), with themes including promotion, education, prevention, early detection, and intervention.
  • Categories of Employees: Progress was made on deeming civilian members as public service employees, scheduled for May 21, 2020.
  • Pay Modernization: The RCMP continued to resolve pay administration issues for public service employees and reservists associated with the implementation of the Phoenix pay system.
  • Regular Member Labour Relations: Work progressed on the establishment of a new labour relations framework, and the policy centre continued to provide regular members, civilian members, and reservists with advice and guidance as the RCMP transitions towards a unionized work environment.
  • Safety: Work continued towards meeting the vision and commitments set out in the Occupational Safety Strategy to ensure preventative measures are in place to protect employees in all aspects of their work. The strategy will be launched and implemented once a source of funds is identified.

Human Resources also dedicated a significant amount of time to experimentation by implementing technical solutions to modernize various aspects of the regular member recruiting process to: streamline business processes; gain efficiencies through automation; and reduce overall processing time for applicants. In the fall of 2018, the implementation of systems to manage the electronic intake of applications and documentation, as well as secure file sharing to improve collaboration on applicant files between RCMP business units and business intelligence reporting, will introduce real-time tracking on applicant files and enhance reporting capabilities. Ongoing efforts supported the RCMP in reaching its 2017-18 cadet enrollment targets, which included a 5.9% increase in enrollments compared to the previous fiscal year. On the public service front, efforts continued to promote greater and consistent use of flexible work arrangements, enhanced managerial discretion, and improvements in the time to staff positions. In addition, departmental staffing policies were streamlined from four mandatory policies to two mandatory policies.

Professional Responsibility

The Professional Responsibility Sector continued to provide direction and leadership to support a regime focused on integrity, while entrenching professional responsibility in all decision making. The Professional Ethics Strategic Plan continued to advance, focused on three priorities:

  • Ethical leadership: Comparative research was conducted into legislative reform processes and adjustments continued to be made.
  • Ethical governance: Improvements were made to quality assurance, compliance, and monitoring of procedures and policies related to professional responsibilities.
  • Ethical culture: A review of the RCMP's core values, in relation to other police services, supported the current approach, with additional focus on increased communication of expected behaviours associated with each core value.
Diversity and Inclusion

Progress on the RCMP's commitment to gender equality, diversity, inclusion, and cultural transformation was made in key priority areas. A significant gain was made by restructuring various Employment Equity and diversity committees to align through a National Committee on Diversity and Inclusion and new Gender and Harassment Advisory Committees. Such a change supported more comprehensive employee consultation and communication with all equity groups.

New training on inclusive leadership was introduced to employees, and the first RCMP resource guide for gender transition was released. Further, the RCMP partnered with World of Education and the Department of Justice to promote the Students with Special Needs Work Experience Opportunity (SSNWEO), a pilot project developed and successfully launched during the reporting period. A review is now underway to formalize the pilot project and provide this opportunity more broadly across the organization.

Training and Application of GBA+

In 2017, new resources supported the advancement of GBA+, enabling the RCMP to make significant progress in integrating GBA+ as a sustained organizational practice. Individual GBA+ advice sessions were held across all major RCMP business lines at headquarters, and GBA+ and inclusive leadership discussions were held with all the Commanding Officers and executive teams. Status of Women Canada's Introduction to GBA+ online course was promoted broadly and was made mandatory for many groups including executives, instructional designers, and applicants to the Officer Candidate Program. To date, more than 5,000 RCMP employees have completed the course.

The RCMP recognized that change over the long term required challenging assumptions and undertaking analysis to not only identify, but also address, barriers to an inclusive police force. At the federal level, the RCMP, along with other uniformed agencies, agreed to collaborate on uniform modernization by using GBA+ to develop shared guiding principles to ensure inclusive uniform policies. Within the RCMP, GBA+ resources were engaged to undertake targeted projects in critical areas to provide evidence-based assessments and recommendations, such as with units who self-identified as having low rates of diversity. GBA+ analysis was also carried out on recruitment to identify strategies to attract, train, and support diverse applicants. Initial recommendations were being implemented including the review of the RCMP entrance exam.

Open and Transparent Government

In 2017-18, the RCMP's Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Branch addressed over 10,200 requests. Due to this significant workload, the ATIP Branch undertook several initiatives to improve internal processes and client services, including: holding a national conference with all business lines and divisional liaison officers to streamline and improve process delivery, while clarifying roles and responsibilities for all RCMP employees; providing guidance and support to improve service delivery; and presenting training sessions in multiple divisions and business lines. Moreover, in support of the government's commitment on openness and transparency, the RCMP worked closely with other departments and agencies to update business practices in preparation for Bill C-58, which will amend the Access to Information Act to provide for the proactive publication of certain identified information.

In addition, National Communication Services (NCS) worked on several public awareness campaigns related to: impaired driving and road safety; fraud awareness; missing children; human trafficking; counterfeit and unlicensed pharmaceuticals; and police officer recruitment. Internally, NCS supported significant campaigns related to harassment prevention and mental health awareness. Social media platforms were used to increase the reach of communication activities, and a new national Instagram account was launched. These efforts were front and centre in 2017-18 to support continued connection, interaction, and open communication with the public, partners, and stakeholders, as well as RCMP employees.

Operational Information Technology and Management

In 2017-18, following a detailed gap analysis and extensive negotiation, the RCMP and Shared Services Canada (SSC) obtained support to develop a business arrangement to address the 24/7/365 operational requirements of the RCMP, as well as its public safety and security mandate. The agreement established a new SSC/RCMP service delivery model, which included the creation of a dedicated SSC directorate responsible for service delivery to the RCMP. In partnership with SSC, the RCMP continued to maintain the availability of key operational information systems that directly support front-line policing, including CPIC, where it has upheld a 99.7% availability standard for many years, processing nearly one million daily transactions with a one-second response time.

The RCMP also implemented an innovation challenge, which gave employees an opportunity to put forward innovative solutions and practices that were developed over an eight-week period. The challenge generated ideas for key enablers to support the agile delivery of IM/IT applications and solutions including automation and the re-use of technical code to reduce timelines and inconsistencies that impact service delivery. This practice was exercised several times in 2017-18 and will continue on a quarterly or triannual basis.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities
available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
777,760,795 792,441,191 1,016,675,697 856,240,683 63,799,492
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)
5,388 5,632 244

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph (in millions)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 525 657 451 466 463 462
Voted 2,331 2,361 2,760 3,075 2,836 2,826

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and
Internal Services
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Police Operations 1,628,412,337 2,100,223,111 2,317,576,842 2,192,263,363 2,060,235,127 1,891,655,870 1,838,068,322 1,768,230,682
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 193,627,855 193,627,855 192,251,844 170,148,269 208,944,628 182,370,525 159,347,221 155,007,056
International Policing Operations 53,067,195 53,067,195 51,065,549
51,099,114 69,115,118 43,542,013 47,136,030 53,755,447
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 11,604,175 11,604,175 11,988,693 11,991,226 12,882,134 14,147,947 15,061,088 13,369,819
Transfer Payments 218,086,483 224,013,665 246,436,483 187,736,483 225,366,241 223,026,852 196,862,445 179,890,362
Subtotal 2,104,798,045 2,582,536,001 2,819,319,411 2,613,238,455 2,576,543,248 2,354,743,207 2,256,475,106 2,170,253,366
Internal Services 777,760,795 792,441,191 721,333,803 685,338,001 1,016,675,697 856,240,683 761,150,978 685,974,205
Total 2,882,558,840 3,374,977,192 3,540,653,214 3,298,576,456 3,593,218,945 3,210,983,890 3,017,626,084 2,856,227,571

The RCMP's actual spending was $164 million lower than planned spending identified in the 2017-18 Departmental Plan. The variance relates primarily to expenditures incurred, but not included in planned spending, related to compensation adjustments and work in advance of the G7, which was offset by delayed spending on the Merlo Davidson legal settlement. In addition, the RCMP anticipated funding for implementation of a new funding model for Contract Policing in 2017-18. The funding model reflects a technical adjustment that consists of significant increases in appropriations to the RCMP's reference levels. The one-time adjustment is cost neutral to the fiscal framework as the increase in appropriations will be offset by an increase in non-respendable, non-taxable revenue. The overall federal portion of the cost to deliver contract policing services has remained consistent with prior years.

Actual spending in the RCMP was up $193.4 million, or 6.4% higher, in 2017-18 when compared to 2016-17. This is comprised of increases in: gross operating expenditures of $497.2 million; capital expenditures of $20.6 million; and grants and contributions of $35.5 million. The increases were offset by increases in vote-netted revenues of $146.2 million and a decrease in statutory expenditures of $213.7 million.

The increase to vote netted revenue is largely attributed to an increase in Contract Policing activities. The increase to grants and contributions spending is primarily under the grant to compensate members of the RCMP for injuries received in the performance of duty. The decrease in statutory expenditures is related to a one-time increase in government contributions to the superannuation account in 2016-17.

The year-over-year increases to the RCMP's operating and capital expenditures are related to: compensation adjustments, including retroactive salary payments for public service employees as well as civilian and regular members; increased overtime expenditures related to the forest fires in British Columbia and protests in Muskrat Falls, Newfoundland; expenditures in advance of Canada hosting the G7 Summit in 2018-19; costs associated with the RCMP's increased efforts to recruit and train regular members, known as force generation; payouts related to the Merlo Davidson legal settlement; and incremental workloads associated with asylum seekers in Quebec and Manitoba.

Planned spending in 2018-19 is anticipated to be higher than 2017-18, as a new funding model for Contract Policing, as identified above, will be implemented April 1, 2018. In addition, the RCMP is anticipating actual spending to increase in 2018-19 due to G7 and Merlo Davidson legal settlement initiatives. The RCMP also anticipates increased spending in support of the legalization of cannabis, the drug impaired driving regime and the irregular migration initiative.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and
Internal Services
2015-16
Actual full-time equivalents
2016-17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
Police Operations 22,035 22,129 22,470 22,391 22,587 22,605
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 1,366 1,319 1,409 1,273 1,314 1,319
International Policing Operations 179 174 158 173 178 178
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 90 89 96 86 88 88
Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 23,670 23,711 24,133 23,923
24,167 24,190
Internal Services 5,343 5,463 5,388 5,632 5,763 5,803
Total 29,013 29,174 29,521 29,555 29,930 29,993

The RCMP's 2017-18 full-time equivalents (FTEs) number 29,555, which is in line with planned FTEs of 29,521. In comparison to 2016-17, FTEs have increased by 381, or 1.3%, and are primarily due to growth in Contract Policing. In addition, the RCMP has experienced growth within programs in support of recruiting and training regular members, commonly known as force generation.

FTE requirements are anticipated to increase from 29,555 in 2017-18 to 29,930 in 2018-19. The planned increase of 375 FTEs, or 1.3%, is primarily attributed to growth in Contract Policing, as well as incremental resources requirements within Specialized Policing Services in support of various initiatives such as: the implementation of a drug impaired driving regime; the legalization and regulation of cannabis; as well as expanded biometric screening. Furthermore, the RCMP anticipates increases in the number of cadet recruits attending the training academy at Depot, as well as increased resources in support of force generation, as a measure to begin to address the organization's demand for regular members.

There is a minimal increase (63 FTEs or 0.2%) to 2019-20 planned FTEs, the majority of which can be attributed to continued growth within programs in support of force generation.

As noted in the RCMP's 2018-2019 Departmental Plan, the RCMP has faced significant financial and human resourcing challenges, which includes the recruitment and training of regular members. These resourcing challenges have impacted the RCMP's ability to replace attrition and meet new demand. The departmental review process established by Treasury Board will be used to bring forward recommendations in 2018-19 to address these challenges.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the RCMP's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017-2018. Footnote 17

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the RCMP's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote 18

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The RCMP's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the RCMP's website. Footnote 19

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017-18
Planned results
2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
Difference
(2017-18 Actual results
minus 2017-18
Planned results)
Difference
(2017-18 Actual results
minus 2016-17
Actual results)
Total expenses 5,187,012,000 5,649,708,000

5,377,992,000

462,696,000

271,716,000

Total revenues 1,575,520,000 2,288,078,000 2,012,237,000 712,558,000 275,841,000
Net cost of operations before
government funding and transfers
3,611,492,000 3,361,630,000 3,365,755,000 (249,862,000) (4,125,000)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017-18 2016-17 Difference
(2017-18 minus
2016-17)
Total net liabilities 1,142,859,000 1,022,128,000 120,731,000
Total net financial assets 1,002,694,000 782,855,000 219,839,000
Departmental net debt 140,165,000 239,273,000 (99,108,000)
Total non-financial assets 1,685,657,000 1,577,065,000 108,592,000
Departmental net financial position 1,545,492,000 1,337,792,000 207,700,000

Financial Highlights Charts

The charts below illustrate the distribution of each of the items in the Statement of Operations and the Statement of Financial Position.

Expenses

The majority of the expenses (75.4%) are related to the costs of Police Operations, which contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Approximately 16.1% of the expenses are related to Internal Services, which supports the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the RCMP. Another 3.4% are related to activities that contribute to Canadian Law Enforcement Services, while 4.0% is related to Transfer Payments. The other activities combined represent 1.1% of total expenses.

Distribution of Expenses
Police Operations Internal Services Canadian Law Enforcement Services International Policing Operations Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Transfer Payments
Percentage 75.4 16.1 3.4 1.0 0.1 4.0

Revenues

The RCMP's Policing Services generates 99.2% of the respendable amount of revenues. Policing Services contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Distribution of Revenues
Policing Services Other Revenues
Percentage 99.2 0.8

Liabilities

The RCMP's liabilities consist mainly of accounts payable and accrued liabilities (53.6%), vacation pay and compensatory leave (22.6%), employee future benefits (14.2%), RCMP Pension accounts (3.2%) and net deferred revenue (2.7%). The other liabilities combined represent 3.7% of total liabilities.

Liabilities by Type
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Vacation pay and compensatory leave Employee future benefits RCMP Pension accounts Net deferred revenue Environmental
liabilities
Lease obligations for tangible capital assets Other
liabilities
Percentage 53.6 22.6 14.2 3.2 2.7 0.9 1.3 1.5

Assets

The RCMP's assets consist mainly of tangible capital assets (60.0%), net accounts receivable and advances (26.8%) and due from Consolidated Revenue Fund (10.5%). The balance of assets is comprised of inventory (2.7%).

Assets by Type
Tangible capital assets Net accounts receivable and advances Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund Inventory
Percentage 60.0 26.8 10.5 2.7

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Commissioner Brenda Lucki

Ministerial portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling Instruments:

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1873

Reporting framework

The RCMP's Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017-18 are shown below:

  • 1 Strategic Outcome: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
    • 1.1 Program: Police Operations
      • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Contract Policing
        • 1.1.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Provincial/Territorial Policing
        • 1.1.1.2 Sub-sub-program: Municipal Policing
        • 1.1.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Aboriginal Policing
      • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Federal Policing
        • 1.1.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Federal Policing General Investigations
        • 1.1.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations
        • 1.1.2.3 Sub-sub-program: Criminal Intelligence
        • 1.1.2.4 Sub-sub-program: Protective Services
        • 1.1.2.5 Sub-sub-program: Public Engagement
        • 1.1.2.6 Sub-sub-program: Federal Policing Operations Support
      • 1.1.3 Sub-program: Technical Services and Operational Support
        • 1.1.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Technical Investigations
        • 1.1.3.2 Sub-sub-program: Protective Technologies
        • 1.1.3.3 Sub-sub-program: Air Services Operations
        • 1.1.3.4 Sub-sub-program: Scientific Services/Technologies
        • 1.1.3.5 Sub-sub-program: Operational Readiness and Response
    • 1.2 Program: Canadian Law Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support
        • 1.2.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Integrated Forensic Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.2 Sub-sub-program: National Forensic Laboratory Services
        • 1.2.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.4 Sub-sub-program: Science and Strategic Partnerships (Forensic)
        • 1.2.1.5 Sub-sub-program: Criminal Intelligence Service Canada
        • 1.2.1.6 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
        • 1.2.1.7 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC)
      • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Canadian Firearms Program
        • 1.2.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Licensing and Registration
        • 1.2.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.3 Sub-program: Advanced Police Training
        • 1.2.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police College
        • 1.2.3.2 Sub-sub-program: National Law Enforcement Training
  • 2 Strategic Outcome: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
    • 2.1 Program: International Policing Operations
      • 2.1.1 Sub-program: Peacekeeping Mission
      • 2.1.2 Sub-program: Capacity Building Mission
      • 2.1.3 Sub-program: Liaison Mission
    • 2.2 Program: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage
      • 2.2.1 Sub-program: Musical Ride
      • 2.2.2 Sub-program: Partnerships and Heritage
  • 3 Strategic Outcome: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death
    • 3.1 Program: Transfer Payments
      • 3.1.1 Sub-program: Members Injured on Duty – Compensation, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) Disability Pension
      • 3.1.2 Sub-program: Survivor Income Plan
      • 3.1.3 Sub-program: Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act Payments
  • Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower level programs is available on the GC InfoBase. Footnote 20

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the RCMP's website: Footnote 21

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Evaluations
  • Fees
  • Horizontal initiatives
  • Internal audits
  • Response to parliamentary committees and external audits
  • Status report on projects operating with specific Treasury Board approval

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals, and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. Footnote 22 This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures including descriptions, objectives, historical information, and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Strategic Policy and Planning Directorate
73 Leikin Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0R2

RPP_DPR-RPP_RMR@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations, or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities, and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation, and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies, and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes, and issues including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs, and initiatives. The "plus" in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender, and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators, and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments, and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability, and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision, and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level, and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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