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Statistical Overview

Open-source Data

Homicide in Canada, 2007 Statistics Canada, Juristat

  • Police reported 594 homicides in Canada during 2007, 12 fewer than the previous year, resulting in a 3% decrease in the homicide rate (1.8 homicides per 100,000 population).
  • This is the second consecutive decline in the homicide rate.
  • Homicide rates fell in seven of ten provinces, with Manitoba being the main exception. The 2007 rate [of 5.22] in Manitoba was the highest among all of the provinces and the highest in that province since statistics were first collected in 1961.

Homicide victims at equal risk of being shot or stabbed.

  • There were 190 homicides committed by stabbings and 188 were shot, with each method accounting for about one-third of all homicides.
  • There were 116 victims killed by beating (20%), 50 by strangulation or suffocation (8%) and 16 by a motor vehicle (3%).

Homicide in Canada, 2005 Statistics Canada, Juristat

According to 2003 health statistics there were a total of 792 deaths in Canada that involved a firearm. (latest year figures were available),

  • Among these, more than three-quarters (78%) were suicides, 17% homicides and 3% accidental discharges of a firearm.
  • Firearm-related homicides account for less than 1 in 5 fatalities involving firearms.
  • The remaining 2% were due to legal intervention (i.e. police shooting) or undetermined intent (Statistics Canada, 2003).

Canadian Association of Emergency Physician’s January 2009, Position Statement on Gun Control

Firearms are an important cause of injury and death

In 2004, 743 Canadians were killed by the use of firearms(2.4 per 100 000 people) and, despite general media focus on urban crime, 76% of these firearm-related deaths were caused by suicide. Firearm-related injury significantly impacts our health care system. In the 2001/02 fiscal year, 606 hospital admissions were a result of gunshot wounds (GSWs). Of these, firearm-related wounds that were intentionally inflicted by another person accounted for 37% (224); unintentional wounds, 34% (205); and suicide attempts, 20% (121).

Many more victims of firearm-related wounds are discharged directly from emergency departments (EDs). Although national data for ED visits is unavailable, in 2004/05, 624 Ontario ED visits resulted from firearm-related injuries versus 199 hospital admissions. In addition to morbidity and mortality, the total medical cost (including direct care costs and lost productivity) associated with firearm-related injuries in Canada in 1991 was estimated at $6.6 billion.

Homicide is among the top 10 causes of death in Canada for those aged 1–34 years. Despite increases in gang violence and homicide as a result of illegal guns, firearm homicides have decreased significantly since the 1991 introduction of stricter gun control: from 271 (a rate of 0.99 per 100 000 people) in 1991 to 190 (0.58 per 100 000) in 2006.Those opposed to long gun registration claim that there is a lack of criminal activity involving long guns. Of firearm-related homicides in 2005 in Canada, 25% were by rifles or shotguns, 58% by handguns and 18% by prohibited firearms. Long guns were used in 72% of firearm-related spousal homicides. Additionally, 10 of the 13 police officers killed on the job in the last decade were murdered by long guns (77%).

Since the implementation of the gun registry in 1995, a 30% reduction in homicides by long guns has occurred. Some urban–rural differences may also exist. A national study of illicit firearms demonstrated that long guns were more commonly used in rural crimes, and handguns were used in most urban crimes involving firearms. Between 1998 and 2003 in Toronto, 93% of firearm homicides involved a handgun. In 2006, police recovered 61 (36%) firearms that had been used in homicides. Of these, 18 (30%) were registered (i.e., 12 rifles or shotguns, 4 handguns and 2 sawed off rifles or shotguns). Police were able to determine ownership in 45 (74%) cases: 26 were owned by the accused, 2 by the victim and 17 by another person (10 of these were reported as stolen).

Canada Safety Council, 2004

  • In Canada, suicide is the leading cause of death for men age 25-29 and 40-44 and for women aged 30-34. It is the second leading cause of death among youth aged 15-24. For each completed suicide there are 100 attempts, and over 23,000 Canadians are hospitalized each year as a result of a suicide attempt.
  • The proportion of completed suicides is highest with a firearm (92%). A home where there are firearms is five times (5X) more likely to be the scene of a suicide than a home without a gun. *Reducing access to guns results in fewer suicides.
  • Nearly 80% of all firearm deaths in Canada are suicides, compared to 15% of homicides. A firearm is the method used in nearly 20% of all suicide fatalities. *Some say that in the absence of a firearm, a suicidal person will seek out another method, but research indicates that is not so. * Our information contradicts this: Statistics Canada, Cdn Vital Statistics

A Quebec study led by Dr. Robert Simon examined whether suicide rates were related to gun ownership rates.

It found that where hunting for sport is common and firearms are more readily available, the firearm suicide rate is higher than in urban areas. Moreover, as the firearm related suicide rate increased, so did the overall death rate by suicide. The researchers concluded that if a suicidal person does not have access to a firearm, there is no evidence that another method will be used, at least not one as lethal as a firearm. Suicide and Firearms: Restricted Access in Canada.

Firearm Deaths in Canada
  Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other unspecified Hand-gun Long-gun Other unspecified Homicide, suicide and accidental
2004 *112-14% 52- 7% 9 88- 11% 475- 61% 29 1 14- 2% 0 780
2003 110-15% 45- 6% 6 95- 13% 451- 60% 14 4- 1% 12- 2% 10 747
2002 98-12% 46- 5% 8 92- 11% 553- 66% 25 8- 1% 9- 1% 2 841
2001 110-12% 53- 6% 8 106- 12% 569- 64% 25 3 17- 2% 0 891

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide & accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial and Territorial Coroners from across Canada

Firearm Deaths in Ontario
Ontario Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other unspecified Hand-gun Long-gun Homicide, suicide and accidental
2005 * 69- 30% 12- 5% 3 24- 11% 116- 51% 1 1 2 228
2004 46-24% 8- 4% 1 24-12% 108-55% 4 0 4 195
2003 44-21% 8-4% 2 38-18% 111-54% 1 1 2 207
2002 50-23% 13- 6% 0 27- 12% 129- 58% 0 0 2 221
2001 35-17% 12- 6% 1 34- 17% 117- 58% 0 2 2 203
2000 32-15% 15- 7% 0 35- 17% 122- 59% 0 1 3 208
1999 24-10% 21- 9% 3 34- 14% 161- 65% 0 1 3 247
1998 22- 10% 12- 5% 0 37- 16% 151- 66% 1 0 7 230
1997 38- 15% 21- 8% 0 44- 17% 156- 60% 0 1 2 262
1996 39- 14% 20- 7% 1 46- 16% 178- 62% 0 2 2 288

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide& accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial Coroner of Ontario.

Firearm Deaths in Atlantic Region, Canada
(New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland& Labrador)
  Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Homicide, suicide and accidental
2005 * 5- 7% 11- 15% 0 11- 15% 48- 64% 0 0 0 0 75
2004 3- 4% 2- 3% 1 6- 8% 68- 85% 0 0 0 0 80
2003 1- 1% 5- 5% 0 9- 10% 66- 70% 1 1 2 9 94
2002 4- 5% 1- 1% 2 8- 10% 66- 80% 0 1 0 0 82
2001 1- 2% 3- 5% 0 4- 7% 49- 80% 2 0 2 0 61
2000 5- 5% 7- 7% 1 6- 6% 73- 77% 0 0 2 1 95
1999 2- 2% 4- 4% 0 7- 7% 83- 78% 5 0 5 0 106
1998 6- 6% 3- 3% 0 7- 8% 76- 82% 1 0 0 0 93
1997 3- 3% 5- 5% 0 6- 6% 73- 78% 2 0 4 0 93

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide & accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial Coroners; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Newfoundland& Labrador; and Prince Edward Island

Firearm Deaths in British Columbia, Canada
  Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Homicide, suicide and accidental
2005 * 13- 11% 9- 8% 13- 11% 15- 13% 65- 56% 1 0 1 0 117
2004 30- 23% 6- 5% 4 20- 15% 66- 51% 0 1 3 0 130
2003 27- 22% 6- 5% 3 22- 18% 62- 50% 1 1 2 0 124
2002 13- 10% 16- 13% 4 25- 20% 63- 50% 2 2 2 0 127
2001 18- 16% 5- 4% 1 20- 17% 68- 59% 2 0 1 0 115
2000 20- 17% 13- 11% 2 17- 14% 66- 55% 0 1 2 0 121
1999 23- 15% 9- 6% 5 21- 14% 94- 61% 1 1 1 0 155
1998 9- 7% 10- 8% 6 23- 17% 77- 58% 3 2 2 0 132
1997 16- 9% 18- 10% 4 25- 14% 113- 62% 2 2 2 0 182
1996 23- 14% 25- 15% 0 29- 17% 85- 50% 0 3 5 0 170

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide& accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial Coroner of British Columbia.


Firearm Deaths in Prairie Region of Canada
(Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba)
  Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Homicide, suicide and accidental
2006       16 115 12 0 4 0  
2005 * 20- 11% 22- 13% 8 9- 5% 105- 60% 9 0 2 1 176
2004 14- 8% 25- 14% 1 18- 10% 110- 63% 1 0 6 0 175
2003 12- 6% 15- 8% 0 15- 8% 139- 74% 1 1 4 0 187
2002 14- 8% 8- 4% 2 14- 8% 135- 74% 1 3 3 2 182
2001 7- 3% 18- 9% 3 18- 9% 148- 73% 2 1 6 0 203

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide& accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial Coroners of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.


Firearm Deaths in Quebec
  Homicide1 Suicide2 Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Homicide, suicide and accidental
2006       19 112 21 0 0 0  
2005 *21- 10% 12- 5% 4 11- 5% 144- 66% 27 0 0 0 219
2004 19- 10% 9- 5% 2 20- 10% 117- 61% 24 0 1 0 192
2003 26- 21% 9- 7% 1 11- 9% 61- 50% 10 0 2 1 121
2002 17- 8% 8- 4% 0 17- 8% 149- 69% 22 2 1 0 216
2001 49- 17% 12- 4% 3 30- 10% 171- 59% 19 0 6 0 290
2000 41- 14% 25- 8% 4 29- 10% 157- 53% 37 2 2 1 298
1999 37- 12% 18- 6% 4 31- 10% 203- 66% 9 1 5 0 308

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide& accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm homicide source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

2. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Provincial Coroner of Quebec.

Firearm Deaths in Northern Territories of Canada
(Yukon, North West Territories and Nunavut)
  Homicide1 Suicide Accidental Total
Year Hand- gun (% of total) Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Hand-gun Long-gun Other Homicide, suicide and accidental
2004 0 * 2- 25% 0 0 6- 75% 0 0 0 0 8
2003 0 * 2- 25% 0 0 12- 86% 0 0 0 0 14
2002 0 0 0 1- 8% 11- 85% 0 0 1-8% 0 13
2001 0 3- 16% 0 0 16- 84% 0 0 0 0 19
2000 0 0 0 0 13- 100% 0 0 0 0 13
1999 0 0 0   16- 94% 0 0 1 - 6% 0 17

* First number denotes number of deaths. Second percentage is in relation to total homicide, suicide& accidental deaths, in the far right column.

1. Firearm suicide and accidental death source: Chief Territorial Coroners of the North West Territories, Yukon and Nunavut.

Statistics Canada observations and analysis of Coroner Firearm data

Observations and analysis of data on deaths attributed to firearms-related suicide or unintentional injury

Data Source and analysis

Rates of death (deaths per 100,000 population) were calculated by dividing the number of deaths in each year for which data were available by the provincial population in that year. For inter-censal years, Statistics Canada’s provincial population estimates were used. Rates were calculated separately for sui9cides and unintentional deaths. Trend analysis was used to assess the significance change in the rates over time in each province, for unintentional deaths and suicides attributed to rifles/shotguns. A predetermined level of significance was set up ap<0.05. Note that statistical testing was not performed in the assessment of inter-jurisdictional comparisons.

Findings

Firearms-related suicide

Rates of death due to firearms-related suicide varied widely among jurisdictions and over time (Table 1). The highest rates were observed in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and the lowest were in Ontario.

Differences also emerged within regions. In the Atlantic provinces, rates were generally higher in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and lower in PEI. In the prairie region, rates were somewhat higher in Saskatchewan than in the other provinces, at least over the few recent years for which data from all prairie provinces were provided.Rates in Québec were fairly similar to those in Newfoundland/Labrador, Manitoba, Alberta and BC.

Statistically significant decreases in firearms-related suicide rates over time occurred in New Brunswick (1985-2005), Ontario (1986-2005), Manitoba (1986-2006), Alberta (1998-2006) and BC (1987-2006) (Table 3).

Firearms-related unintentional death

Inter-jurisdictional comparisons are limited by the lack of data from some jurisdictions, and by missing data for many years in some of the jurisdictions for which data were provided (Table 2). Rates were consistently higher in the Northwest Territories than in the seven provinces for which data were available (New Brunswick, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, BC). Among these provinces, rates tended to be higher in Saskatchewan and New Brunswick than elsewhere.

Significant decreases over time occurred in New Brunswick (1985-2005), Québec (1999-2006, Ontario (1986-2005), Alberta (1998-2005) and the Northwest Territories (1985-2006) (Table 3).

Total Suicide and Firearm-related Suicide Deaths in Canada
Year Total Suicide Firearm-related Suicide % of suicide death rate, related to firearms
2000 11.7 2.2 18.8
2001 11.9 2.1 17.6
2002 11.6 2 17.2
2003 11.9 2 16.8
2004 11.3 1.8 15.9
2005 11.6 1.8 15.5

Rate per 100,000 population

1. From 2000-2005, the rate for total suicides fluctuated slightly, but was basically stable. During the same period, the firearms-related suicide rate showed a downward trend, and the percentage of the suicide death rate that also declined (from 18.8% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2005).
2. The overall rate of suicide has been fairly stable over this six-year period, however the contribution to that rate accounted for by firearms-related suicides has steadily decreased.

Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics

Homicide in Canada, 2007, Statistics Canada, Juristat

  • Contrary to a decline in homicides overall, gang-related homicides continued to increase in 2007 and accounted for about one in five homicides in Canada.
  • Generally, Canadian homicide victims are at equal risk of being either shot or stabbed, with each method accounting for about one-third (1/3) of all homicides.
  • The use of handguns to commit homicide continues to rise, while the use of rifles/shotguns continues to decline. In 2007, two-thirds (2/3) of firearms related homicides were committed with a handgun.
  • Homicides are a relatively rare occurrence in Canada and have been generally declining over the past 30 years. In 2007, homicides made up less than one percent (1%) of all violent crime in Canada. See Statistics Canada: Chart 2 - Homicides peaked in mid-1970s
  • Homicide is the only criminal offence that is truly comparable among nations. Compared to other countries, Canada’s homicide rate continues to be about one-third (1/3) that of the United States, but comparable to Australia, New Zealand and many European nations. See Statistics Canada: Chart 1 - Homicide rates for selected countries

Firearms and Violent Crime, 2006 Statistics Canada, Juristat

  • The large majority of police- reported violent crimes do not involve a firearm. In 2006, a firearm was used against 2.4% of the victims of violence crime. Physical force and threatening behavior were much more common, accounting for three-quarters (3/4) of all victimizations.
  • Victims of robbery and assault accounted for about three-quarters of the total number of firearm related victimizations in 2006.
  • Although the incidents of attempted murder and homicide was much lower, a firearm was used against approx one-third (33%) of victims of these offences, which is substantially higher then the proportions for robbery (14%) and assault (1%)
Presence of firearms in violent crime down
Year % of violent incidents with Firearms
1998 4
1999 3.8
2000 3.1
2001 2.7
2002 2.6
2003 2.9
2004 2.8
2005 2.7

Source: Statistics Canada, Canaidan Centre for Justice Sttistics, Statistics Canada, Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2 Trend file)

Homicide in Canada, 2007, Statistics Canada, Juristat

Homicide rates highest in the west and the north

  • Over the past 10 years, the western provinces, particularly Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and the territories have consistently reported the highest homicide rates in the country.
  • Last year was no exception, as the highest rate was in Manitoba, followed by Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia. Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador continue to report the lowest rates. See Statistics Canada - Chart 3 Highest homicide rates usually in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

Among the major Canadian Cities (CMAs) homicide rates are highest in the west

  • In 2007, three large metropolitan areas, all in western Canada, reported homicide rates in excess of 3.0 per 100,000 population: Winnipeg, Edmonton and Calgary. Saskatoon, although a smaller metropolitan area, actually reported the highest rate of all cities (3.60). See Statistics Canada - Chart 4 Among the largest Census Metropolitan Areas homicide rates highest in the west
  • Toronto’s rate ranked in the middle of the nine largest cities. (In absolute numbers, Toronto accounted for 1 in 5 homicides in Canada in 2007, adjusted for population)
  • Calgary’s rate in 2007 was much higher than the average of the previous 10 years, as the homicide rate there has increased sharply since 2003.
  • Quebec City reported having no homicides in 2007, marking the first time since CMA data were first available in 1981 that any metropolitan area with over 500,000 population did not have any homicides.

The use of handguns to commit homicide increasing

  • Although the overall rate of homicides committed with a firearm has generally been declining since the mid-1970s, the use of handguns has generally been increasing since the mid-1980s. The use of rifles or shotguns in homicides continues to decline. See Statistics Canada - Chart 5 Use of rifles and shotguns continue to decline in 2007
  • Of the 188 firearms used to commit homicide in 2007, two-thirds (2/3) were handguns, 16 more than in 2006. There were also 32 homicides committed with rifles/shotguns in 2007 and 17 with sawed-off rifles/shotguns, both down from 2006.
  • Homicides committed with handguns are primarily an urban phenomenon. Within the nation’s metropolitan areas, 81% of all firearm homicides were committed with a handgun in 2007, compared to 29% in the rest of Canada. (The Non-Census Metropolitan Areas between 1996 and 2005 averaged 65% long-gun homicides vs. 31% handgun homicides.)

Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, 2008

Regional Firearm Trends in Canada

  • Prairie (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) - Long guns are preferred by the criminal element throughout the Prairie provinces as this type of firearm tends to be more readily available in rural areas and thus targeted for criminal acquisition.
  • Ontario - In Ontario, both handguns and long guns are the illegal firearms of preference throughout the province, although certain areas appear to favor one type over another.
  • In larger urban centers such as the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and cities in southwestern Ontario handguns are preferred, whereas long guns are the weapon of choice in some smaller urban (e.g. Kingston, Halton and Sault Ste. Marie) and rural areas.
  • Many sawed-off shotguns (and other long guns) that are recovered on the streets of Toronto have been found to originate from break and enters carried out in the large cottage area just north of the GTA.
  • Quebec - Overall, long guns are the most commonly seized firearm in Quebec based on seizure statistics; however, handguns are the gun of choice when referring to members of criminal organizations.
  • Atlantic (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador) - Long guns are the illegal gun of preference throughout the Atlantic provinces, with the exception of urban areas (Halifax and Saint John) where handguns are more prevalent.

Homicide in Canada, 2005, Statistics Canada, Juristat

Homicide in Canada 2005, Statistics Canada, Juristat, Chart 4 (Rate of firearm homicides, Canada, 1975 to 2005) shows the firearm-related homicide rate between 1974 and 2005 indicatingwhere legislative changes have been enacted. The informiton is not intended to imply a casual relationship between gun control legislation and homicide rates. The following provides a summary of related Firearms Legislation.

Firearm Legislation

Firearm licensing and registration in Canada originated in the late 19th century. In 1892, the first firearm laws were introduced requiring owners of pistols to carry a certificate of exemption. In 1919 and 1920, it became a criminal offence for anyone to purchase a firearm without first having a firearms permit. In 1934, a centralized registry was established which required all handguns to be registered and in 1951 automatic firearms were added to the category of firearms to be registered.

In 1969 Parliament enacted Bill C-150 and amended the Criminal Code which for the first time made it illegal to provide firearms to persons of “unsound mind” or criminals under prohibition orders….

In 1977 Parliament enacted Bill C-51 and amended the Criminal Code requiring individuals to obtain a firearms Acquisition Certificate (FAC). The legislation also introduced a variety of provisions including regulations on safe storage and display of firearms for businesses and bona-fide gun collectors. Mandatory minimum sentences to deter the criminal use of firearms were also introduced.

In 1991 Parliament strengthened the screening provisions for FAC applicants by introducing new legislation (Bill C-17).

In 1995 Parliament passed Bill C-68 which created a scheme to control the acquisition, possession, use, transfer, manufacture, distribution, import and export of all types of weapons, but principally firearms and ammunition. Universal licensing came into effect on January 1, 2003 all firearms (including non-registered rifles and shotguns) had to be registered. In addition, strict new penalties for the trafficking and smuggling of firearms and tougher mandatory minimum sentences for serious offences involving firearms were created.

Homicide in Canada, 2007, Statistics Canada, Juristat

Gang–related homicides on the increase

See Chart 6 - Gang-related homicides on the increase (Statistics Canada) and Firearm-related and gang-related homicides, 1993-2007

  • Firearms were used more often in gang homicides than in other types of murder. In 2007, 69% of gang-related homicides were committed with a firearm, compared to about 20% of homicides which did not involve gangs. In total, 43% of all homicides committed with a firearm in 2007 were gang-related.
  • Most gang-related homicides occurred within Canada’s largest cities. The nine largest metropolitan areas accounted for about 60% of Canada’s homicides in 2007, but for more than three-quarters (3/4) of all gang homicides.

Homicide in Canada, 2007, Statistics Canada, Juristat

See Statistics Canada: Chart 7- Most homicides committed by someone known to victim and Chart 8 - Spousal homicide rate is now at its lowest since the mid-1960s, Chart 3 - Victims of Spousal Homicide Committed with Firearm by type of Firearm, Canada

  • Most homicide victims know their killer. In 2007, 84% of solved homicides were committed by someone known to the victim, most often a family member or an acquaintance.
  • Although the spousal homicide rate fell 18% in 2007, spousal homicides continue to account for just under half of the homicides committed by family members.
  • After peaking in 2006, the number of youth accused of committing homicide decreased from 85 to 74 in 2007. However, the 2007 rate of youth accused of committing homicide was the second highest since 1961.