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Gender and Respect - The RCMP Action Plan

Preface

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This Action Plan is organized around two pillars: the culture and the composition of the Force. It identifies eleven themes and sets out 37 actions that the RCMP will take and includes measures and milestones to assist in monitoring their progress.

The Plan represents the extension of a course that I set in December 2011 and that has been followed with a number of significant actions over the last twelve months. Key among them are:

  • The centralized oversight and administration of harassment cases (Dec 2011);
  • The raising of Regular Member recruiting benchmarks for women from 30% to 35% (Nov 2011);
  • The foundational work for Bill C-42, Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act (June 2012);
  • Six video messages to all employees (Nov, Dec 2011 and Feb, June, July, Oct 2012) and the Every Employee Engaged initiative (July 2012) which have created a Force-wide dialogue about responsibility, accountability, supervision, discipline, ethics, and respect;
  • Two mandatory national town halls for all executives which articulated leadership expectations (May and Dec 2012);
  • De-regionalization and the re-establishment of direct accountability between Commanding Officers and the Commissioner (April 2012);
  • Implementation of the RCMP Organizational Code of Conduct and the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector (April 2012);
  • Increased nationwide harassment training compliance from 89% to 94% (Aug-Nov 2012); and,
  • The Gender-Based Assessment (Jan-Nov 2012).

Actions to date form the foundations of the Plan described herein. Together these will bring about the kind of cultural and compositional changes required to ensure Canadians are best served by an RCMP that reflects themselves and their values.

These issues are tough to unpack and sensitive to address. Moreover, our demographics, to an extent, constrain our freedom to change quickly. These realities do not, however, limit our capacity to plan, our ability to act or our will to succeed. We recognize that we can and must do better. We will do so. It is not good enough to say that we are equal to other police forces nationwide on employment equity-related issues. We intend to lead.

What we undertake must be watched and adjusted as we move forward. Metrics on these Action Items will be published internally every 180 days to ensure transparency.

Our target is two-fold: the culture and the composition of the Force. Our objectives are plain: address the past, modernize today’s management, and build for the future.

Bob Paulson
Commissioner


The culture of the Force:
Address the past, modernize for the present

The RCMP has grappled with aspects of its internal culture for some time. This predates, but was flagged by, the Task Force on Governance and Change and the Reform Implementation Council. Much has been done since its release, though more remains to be done.

1. Addressing harassment

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
1.1 Exercise new authorities to enforce accountability, enable early and timely resolution of workplace issues On hold pending Parliamentary approval and Royal Assent of C-42
  • TB Submission for roll-out plan
  • Alignment with new Civilian Review and Complaints Commission
  • Establishment of informal conflict resolution mechanisms, including staffing of coordinators/practitioners
  • Conduct / HR Processes / Staffing Processes Reformed
  • Revised Regulations and Standing Orders published
  • As per legislation, full implementation within 1 year of Royal Assent
  • Reduction in number of complaints
  • Legislation implementation evaluation
  • number of formal complaints

Once enacted, Bill C-42 (Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act) will be a cornerstone of our efforts to reinforce a culture that promotes accountability and transparency.

The Act would provide RCMP leaders with enhanced authorities to address inappropriate behaviour in a timely and expedited manner, clarify responsibility for all members, establish clearer public accountability in a new Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, streamline HR processes in the resolution of workplace issues (e.g. conduct, grievances, discharge), and, create a more workable framework for investigating complaints and serious incidents. The implementation of the Act will be evaluated and new authorities will include checks and balances to ensure their fair application.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
1.2 Reduce average length of complaints through new central oversight and administration of process
  • Impose TBS service standards (March 2013)
  • Benchmark compliance to standards (March 2013)
Compliance with TBS guidelines
  • Avg length to complete steps 1-5 of harassment process
  • Number of complaints.
1.3 Publish new policies and guides
  • Publish interpersonal workplace relationships policy
  • Publish amended TBS-aligned harassment policy
  • Publish harassment guides
Completion by March 2013 Completion Y/N

Harassment has no place in the RCMP. We recognize it may be impossible to prevent entirely, but we will implement a zero tolerance approach by ensuring: (a) employees feel comfortable and supported in bringing issues forward; (b) identified issues or allegations are addressed properly and expeditiously; and, (c) our many workplaces are free from harassing behaviour.

Since February 2005, the RCMP has received 1,091 harassment complaints from 671 different complainants. Of these, 167 are active and most of those were received this year. They are being addressed expeditiously.Footnote 1

Table 1 – Harassment complaints by region and by type received February 2005 to November 2012Footnote 2

  Abuse of Authority Interpersonal DeportmentFootnote 3 Sexual Harassment Discrimination Total
Atlantic
(NB/NS/PEI/NFLD)
51 102 3 15 171
Central
(NHQ/ONT/QUE)
126 80 6 15 227
Northwest
(AB/SASK/MB/NWT/NT)
126 189 6 6 327
Pacific
(BC/YT)
124 227 11 4 366
Total 427 598 26 40 1091

This national picture of historical and ongoing complaints did not exist a year ago and is a first for the RCMP. It stems directly from a December 2011 decision by the Commissioner to centralize the oversight and administration of complaints in National Headquarters. This new oversight is critical to the organization’s efforts to meet Treasury Board Secretariat standards of 12 months from receipt of complaint to determination of whether or not it is founded.Footnote 4

Centralized oversight will be supported by policy and training guides for human resources personnel and all employees that are in the final pre-printing stage of development. These materials have been developed by a national working group (including Staff Relations and Public Service union representatives, policy centres and field personnel). These set service standards, processes and timelines consistent with the new TBS direction.

More efficient administration will only expedite complaints so much under the current framework. The RCMP will remain challenged to achieve TBS standards pending the implementation of Bill C-42 because it still has to consider complaints through two processes: one defined by TBS, and the second defined by the RCMP Act.Footnote 5 Trying to comply with conflicting processes causes delays. Provisions in C-42 permit resolution of this conflict.

The RCMP will examine the findings of the upcoming Chair-initiated review of harassment complaint handling by the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP and will incorporate its recommendations as appropriate.

As we implement processes and initiatives that foster respectful workplaces, we expect to see some increase in the number of complaints as employees become familiar and comfortable with our approach.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
1.4 Expeditiously resolve, wherever appropriate, outstanding harassment-related lawsuits Quarterly review of each case Resolution of meritorious claims Number of lawsuits

As a result of alleged behaviour by members of the Force, there are a number of ongoing litigation actions, including one seeking certification as a class action, against the RCMP. The organization wants to do the right thing and is balancing the desire to take responsibility for instances of genuine wrongdoing with the need to defend itself from unfounded allegations.

The RCMP stands little to gain by denying the obvious – and it will not do so. As long as these cases dominate the public discourse they will undermine public confidence in our institution and consume  effort. Where wrong has been committed, it will be made right. The RCMP is working with counsel to assess and, where appropriate, resolve expeditiously outstanding legal actions.

The risk that non-meritorious claimants are rewarded impedes our desire and will to initiate a broad “once-and-for-all” styled reconciliation campaign with legitimately impacted employees, both past and serving. We must push past this risk and work with the government to explore options to implement such an approach.

2. Building respectful workplaces

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
2.1 Use Advisory Committees at the national and provincial levels as key forums for discussion of employee issues
  • Oct. 2012 summit of Committee Chairs
  • Year-end report from National Chairs: March 2013
All Divisions to have functioning Advisory Committees
  • Number of meetings / committee / year
  • Best practices shared
2.2 Establish Respectful Workplace Programs nationwide
  • Inclusion on 2013-14 Performance Agreements of Commanding Officers
  • Rollout of programs
Programs in place by June 2013 Mid-year and annual CO assessment
2.3 Establish a confidential process for employees seeking advice or raising awareness of issues
  • Evaluate BC pilot
  • Launch national process
August 2013

Completion Y/N

2.4 Update the existing mandatory Harassment in the Workplace training Transition to new Learning Management System Dec 2013

Completion Y/N

Leaders must be the catalysts and stewards of our cultural evolution. In 2012, the Commissioner and his Senior Management Team initiated “Every Employee Engaged” which asked every manager to engage in a face-to-face discussion with their employees on the priorities of the Force in six key areas: the Work We Do, Leadership, Accountability, Discipline, Promoting and Maintaining an Ethical Organization, and Promoting and Maintaining a Respectful Workplace.  This was reinforced by a video message from the Commissioner in July.

This dialogue must continue. As communication is not about talking at people, but speaking with them, listening to them, and engaging them, Commanding Officers will be asked to further engage their Employee Advisory Committees. These exist but function with greater or lesser effectiveness nationwide. They will be key forums for future dialogue.

These Committees are not expected to supplant existing labour relations mechanisms. When used effectively, however, they can be good sounding boards for discussing issues,constructive forums for brainstorming possible solutions to chronic challenges, and barometers of employee satisfaction. We intend that they be used in this way.

These Committees will not be the only forums. In the coming months, the RCMP will replicate Respectful Workplace programs nationwide similar to the one that is underway with positive effect in British Columbia. These will include activities, tools, policies, guides, training materials, communications and processes aimed at creating sustainable respectful workplaces in every work unit.Footnote 6

Each Commanding Officer will tailor his or her Division’s approach to its needs, within the context of a consistent framework overseen by National Headquarters.

In order for a respectful workplace program to be effective, employees must be assured that they can raise issues in a confidential way, that their concerns will be taken seriously, and that there can be no retribution for well-intentioned action. As a result, the RCMP will also launch a confidential reporting system early in 2013 that provides for direct and timely advice.

No respectful workplace program is complete without a training component. We have already made considerable improvements here. Training on harassment, diversity, and ethical behaviour are core components of instruction at every key juncture of an employee’s career. The foundation is laid at Depot where, throughout the 24-week Cadet Training Program, Cadets are repeatedly assessed in scenarios on their application of the RCMP's core values. It is reinforced throughout an RM’s career through Field Training, the Supervisor Development Program, the Manager Development Program, and the Executive Officer Development Program. That is to say nothing of at least a dozen diversity-related in-service training options.

The foundation for all of this is a mandatory Harassment in the Workplace course. In the last year, over 1500 employees have taken the course, improving the Force’s overall compliance from 89% to 94%. In the coming months, this capstone course will be bolstered with learning elements about building respectful workplaces.

3. Ensuring transparency and objectivity in promotions

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
3.1 Return to rank ordering of Job Simulation Exercises (JSE) for non-commissioned officer exams
  • Employee consultation on short list(s) length
  • 2014 NCO exams
Use in 100% of staffing actions starting April 2014 Completion Y/N
3.2 Creation of a consolidated National Promotion Centre Stand-up April 2013 Completion Y/N
3.3 Audit competency validation boards and line officer selection rationales for fairness and consistency Stand-up of consolidated National Promotion Centre April 2013

Annual reporting

3.4 Educate managers on the use of “fit”
  • Define “fit”
  • Publish revised policy
  • Communication to employees
April 2013 Alignment of fit rationales with definition, according to a directed audit

The 2012 Gender-Based Assessment echoed past studies in identifying that a “lack of faith and transparency of the process” deters both women and men from seeking promotional opportunities at many levels in the Force. The RCMP has begun to address this lingering perception by disclosing Job Simulation Exercise scores to employees as a matter of course. This 2012 decision means our members can benefit from knowing how they did on an objective test.

This does not go far enough, however. In response to the Task Force on Governance and Change’s 2007 Rebuilding the Trust report, the RCMP stopped rank ordering results on the exam in favour of a pass/fail system. While this was supported by many, it had the unintended consequence of creating unmanageably large selection pools and returning a considerable degree of subjectivity to the NCO promotion process; thereby undermining the principal goal of merit-based advancement.

It is not enough to allow managers to select from a pool of successful test-takers when the overwhelming majority of those who take the test pass.Footnote 7 It makes the test a paper tiger as opposed to a real evaluation of merit. Therefore, at the earliest opportunity, in 2014, the RCMP will start ranking NCOJSE results again.

Selecting managers would then decide based on “fit” from a short list of top scorers, rather than  selecting from all interested members who pass.Footnote 8 This is more transparent, merit-based, and objective than the current approach, and more efficient.Footnote 9

Because far fewer candidates will make it to the selecting managers, it will be far easier for managers to execute their role consistently, effectively, and transparently. A sample of decisions will be audited annually for the first time to help establish confidence in the decisions made.

In returning this transparency and objectivity to the process, it is not the Force’s intent to diverge from the Public Service of Canada by removing all discretion from managers. The notion of proper job “fit” is, and must be, a key component of our staffing. Defining “fit” and establishing a rigorous set of criteria for its appropriate application that takes into account employment equity objectives will be a further measure the Force takes to restore faith in promotions.

The return to ranking does not represent a complete rejection of the Task Force’s findings in this area. The NCO promotion system continues to evolve. Since the 2007 report, the Force has added a new “supervisor support” component to promotions to address the concern that performance evaluations are not a determining factor in the process. This will continue.

Moreover, long-standing complaints about the complex and onerous nature of the process – which have largely gone unaddressed – do not go unrecognized. They will be the subject of future reform after renewed consultation with members.

4. Supporting work-life balance more effectively

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
4.1 Promote the use of existing work-life balance options where operationally feasible by informing employees and educating managers

Commissioner Broadcast

Feb 2013 PSES 2014 Survey results
4.2 Design and implement a mechanism for backfilling employees on parental leave, in consultation with contracting partners Discussion at Contract Management Committee 2015 Implementation Y/N

One message that surfaces in the Gender-Based Assessment is that more could be done to facilitate work-life balance for all employees in the RCMP.Footnote 10 Similar themes surfaced in the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey.Footnote 11 While this is not a new message; it has not been effectively addressed to date.

The exigencies of frontline policing make achieving work-life balance particularly difficult from time-to-time. Addressing the issue more effectively starts with increased understanding among employees and managers about the range of options – including flexible shifting, telework, part-time, and leave without pay – that are already sanctioned by the Force, where operationally feasible. In the coming months, the Commissioner will communicate more about these via a broadcast.

Graph 1 - RMs taking Parental or Maternity leave
Source:
HRMIS extract for the GBA, April 19, 2012.

Graph 1 - RMs taking Parental or Maternity leave. Description follows.

[Description of Graph 1 - RMs taking Parental or Maternity leave]

More complex, however, is the challenge of parental leave. Fifteen years ago, then Supt. (now former Commissioner) Bev Busson flagged it as an area of persistent inequality between men and women which causes undue tension within units and on the members themselves. Her concern was that RCMP practice of not backfilling members who go on maternity or paternity leave causes “a lot of the stress…either directly or indirectly by having to feel they have left their partners or shift members down by leaving the watch or the unit short.”Footnote 12 The 2006 Employment Systems Review and other reviews raised similar concerns.Footnote 13

Fifteen years ago, this affected women far more than men. Today, it still does but, more than ever, it affects everyone. Regardless of gender, employees are taking parental leave in increasing numbers, as is their right (see Graph 1).

Extended leave does not create frontline gaps, ineffective organizational management of it does. When not managed properly, unit capacity, morale, and cohesion, as well as service delivery, can suffer.

There are really three possible outcomes: tolerate reduced service to the public, demand increased commitment from those still in the field, or inject resources. The time has come to ensure that the default decision of the organization is not to lean more heavily on members who remain in the field. It is the organization’s challenge to manage, not theirs.

Policies, options and funding frameworks to do so already exist in large measure. These need to be applied and coordinated systematically. Where they are not, dialogue is necessary to create them or to alter service standards as required. Either way, the frontlines should not be unduly impacted by the backfilling requirements of the organization.

We will find a way to advance this through consultation with contracting partners nationwide.

The composition of our Workforce: building for the future

The RCMP’s diversity brings with it new capabilities and approaches to tackling modern criminality. Different backgrounds, perspectives and ways of thinking must be nurtured and fostered in our organization. Increasing diversity will make us a stronger Force.

The Force’s current demographics and planning assumptions greatly limit efforts to alter its composition quickly. These realities must be recognized in discussing the challenge the RCMP faces in attempting to achieve its employment equity goals.

The total RCMP population includes 62.9% men and 37.1% women, 8.1% who self-identify as a visible minority, 6.1% as Aboriginals, and 2.7% as persons with disabilities.

The Regular Member (RM) population is a little different. On April 1, 2012, there were 19,181 Regular Members in the Force: 79.6% (15,268) were men, 20.4% (3,913) were women; 7.6% of RMs self-identified as a visible minority, 7.2% as Aboriginals and 2.3% as persons with disabilities.Footnote 14

Graph 2 - Number of Cadets
*2012-2013 = YTD + projection
Source : Workplace Programs & Services Branch

Graph 2 - Number of Cadets between 2007-2008 and 2012-2013. Description follows.

[Description of Graph 2 - Number of Cadets]

Graph 3 - Proportion of Total Cadet Population
*2012-2013 = YTD + projection
Source : Workplace Programs & Services Branch

Graph 3 - Proportion of Total Cadet Population between 2007-2008 and 2012-2013. Text description follows.

[Description of Graph 3 - Proportion of Total Cadet Population]

The representation of employment equity groups in the Force is, effectively, set for the next several years. Demand for additional RMs has leveled and members are working longer than in recent years.Footnote 15 In response, the RCMP plans to bring relatively few cadets into Depot over the next three years. Because of other initiatives such as civilianization enrollment will not match attrition.

Last fiscal year, for example, the RCMP admitted approximately 1208 less cadets than it did in FY 2008-2009. As a result the number of men and women entering Depot dropped significantly in comparison to the 2008-2009 peak – men by 71% and women by 52% (see graphs at left).Footnote 16

All of this amounts to a sketch of why even concerted efforts to increase diversity through increased enrollment of Regular Members will have relatively little impact on the characteristics of the Force’s demographic composition over the immediate term.

It is regrettable that during recent periods of peak growth (2005-2010), when the Force grew by approximately 6500 RMs, it failed to increase numbers of designated groups through Depot relative to its total population.Footnote 17 This was more than just a missed opportunity; it is also an anchor on future efforts to achieve our employment equity objectives.

The Force aims to maintain a RM workforce composition that includes 30% Women, 20% Visible Minorities, and 10% Aboriginals. Our current approach is not aggressive enough to achieve these goals in the near term.

5. Recruiting targets

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
5.1 Ensure Depot enrollment includes at least 35% women for FYs 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, and approximately 50% thereafter until goal of 30% female population in Force is achieved
  • Ramp up to 50% in FY 2015-2016
  • Distribution of troop data in real-time
30% female RM population in Force in approximately 2025 Statistics

In late 2011, the Commissioner set 35% as the RM recruiting benchmark for women effective April 2012.

The RCMP projects it will come close to meeting that target this Fiscal Year, pending finalization of the troops headed to Depot in February and March 2013.Footnote 18

Graph 4: Basic Female RM population projection based on Depot Enrollment Scenarios.
Source: RCMP HR data and planning assumptions, incl: attrition rates, retirements, & projected demand.

Graph 4 - Basic Female RM population projection based on Depot Enrollment Scenarios (2012-2025). Text description follows

[Description of Graph 4 - Basic Female RM population projection
based on Depot Enrollment Scenarios.
]

The reality is, however, that even the elevated target of 35% enrollment will not rapidly change the composition of the Force. All other things being equal, 35% enrollment to Depot will only result in a Force with 30% women in approximately 2036 – over 20 years away.Footnote 19

Our goal is clear:

A Regular Member workforce that includes
30% women by 2025

Therefore, we will move beyond this 35% target in approximately two years, with the aim of pegging enrollment of women to Depot at 50% thereafter. As a result, the population of the Force would be 30% female by 2025 (dependent on a range of variables).

Given shrinking enrollment in terms of total numbers, even ensuring an increasingly sizeable proportion of enrollees are women could be an empty victory. For example, 20% of a 1000-person entry class means 200 women join the Force; whereas, 35% of a 500-person class mean only 175 women join. The Force will monitor enrollment closely to ensure that the number of recruits, in absolute terms, keep us on track to our overall goal.

6. Attracting more women and individuals from other employment equity groups

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
6.1 Focus recruiting efforts for EE groups Direction issued – completed. Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment
6.2 Conduct advertising targeting individuals from EE groups
  • Submission of funding reallocation proposal to Central Agencies
  • Initiate campaign
Completion of campaign Increase in EE applications to the Force
6.3 Ask all RCMP employees to seek out and identify possible recruits from EE groups Educate and provide employees with tools  and information Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment
6.4 Attract qualified EE recruits regardless of where they live Consultation with Contract Management Committee Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment

We will maintain current recruiting standards for new cadets.

We believe the targets we have set are world-leading for the participation of women in policing.

There is debate among some in the police community as to whether there is sufficient interest from qualified women to make our goal realistic.

We aim to move the yardsticks and plan to do so without changing our qualification requirements. It is the RCMP’s contention that these goals are achievable with sufficient, appropriate efforts into recruiting and demonstrating we are a Force that is accepting of everyone who joins. Policing is a rewarding career for anyone interested in helping their community, protecting our shared values, and tackling challenges. While it is not for everyone, we believe it is outmoded to think higher numbers of women won’t be interested in this type of career.

The most recent Troop through Depot is among the many reasons we believe this is possible. Troop 4, which graduated on December 3, 2012, graduated 24 members including 7 women and 7 visible minorities. Collectively, they spoke not only English and French but also German, Mandarin, Urdu, Farsi, Dari, Punjabi, Hindi and Romanian. This type of Troop is our future.

How will this be achieved? Targeted recruiting, engaging all employees as recruiters, and advertising are proven ways to find good applicants. Tailored exam sessions, career presentations, events, outreach to youth and student groups, and PARE preparation assistance will help. So too will engaging the Force’s best Ambassadors – its employees. These efforts, together with reinvestment in advertising will be a start.

Current restrictions on advertising are one obstacle to achieving these ends. The RCMP has limited discretion, including within its current reference levels, to advertise to attract recruits.Footnote 20 Authority to spend funds to increase applications from individuals in employment equity groups would be an important step towards attracting them to the Force.

Another factor that has limited the Force’s ability to recruit sufficient cadets from designated employment equity groups is our obligation to “make best efforts” to spread recruiting across jurisdictions nationwide. This requires certain numbers of recruits to come from each province.Footnote 21

To date that requirement has been interpreted narrowly. As a result, from time-to-time, we have hampered our ability to create diverse recruit cohorts by not drawing sufficiently from where available employment equity populations are within Canada.

Henceforth, the RCMP is one Force and will be built accordingly.

7. Assisting applicants in joining the Force

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
7.1 Reduce the average length of an application from approximately 13 to 10 months
  • Stand-up of the National Recruiting Centre: September 2013
  • Identification of options to reduce application time: November 2013
September 2014 Completion Y/N
7.2 Roll-out eRPAT Complete pilot phase and rollout in select locations in 2013-14 Full rollout by 2015-16 Average application processing time

The RCMP admits members to Depot based on rigorous criteria including written and physical tests, an interview and medical and security screening. This screening process produces the best and most qualified candidates for Depot, and ultimately for the streets of Canada. It will not be diluted to meet our enrollment goals.

Ensuring we deploy only qualified officers is our core obligation to Canadians, and also to our members themselves. It is critical to the trust that exists between members and between our officers and the public.

The key screening elements of this process are gender neutral. That having been said, we believe there is more that can be done to ensure that candidates, especially women, enter and then do not leave the process voluntarily.

One component of this is to ensure, whenever possible, that the average time it takes an individual to join the Force is as short as possible. The current national average to process a recruiting file is approximately 400 days and varies greatly depending on where an applicant lives. This is unacceptable. We are working to shorten recruit processing time.

A key initiative to reduce these processing times is the consolidation and standardization of recruiting and processing nationwide. This began in September 2012 and is on track to enable the Force to seek considerable process efficiencies starting in September 2013.

As part of this consolidation, we continue to review the recruiting process and identify opportunities for efficiencies. How far wait times can be cut is unknown (especially if innovative solutions to traditional bottlenecks like security clearances can be developed). Our initial target is to aim for a benchmark of 10 months for all applicants by 2014, a 23% reduction from current practice.

Further to this end is the replacement of the paper RCMP Police Aptitude Battery Test (RPAT) with an electronic “eRPAT.” Testing of the eRPAT is currently underway and nationwide rollout should take place in 2014. Eventually, every detachment could be a place where interested individuals could take the test and receive results on the spot, rather than weeks later after paper processing as is the case today. It will be shorter, more secure and more accurate.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
7.3 Offer PARE preparation assistance to potential new recruits Disseminate best practices: January 2013 Innovative preparation initiatives Reduced failure rate on PARE during recruitment

Rethinking the placement and role of the Physical Abilities Requirement Evaluation (PARE) test in screening is also underway. PARE is the physical abilities test that potential recruits must pass – 96% of them do. It has historically been one of the filtering points in the application process and, according to the Gender-Based Assessment, one of the largest success rate differences (14%) between men and women.Footnote 22

Ensuring potential members are physically fit enough to do the job remains a key requirement of the recruiting process; however, PARE must continue to be assessed to ensure it remains an accurate assessment of what is required for policing in 2012, and to ensure it is appropriately placed in the recruiting process (i.e. early) are open questions. Therefore, while this is analyzed further, we will do more to assist applicants with the PARE test to ensure that they make it to, and are ready for, Depot.

A number of Divisions – in particular Ontario – already offer PARE preparation sessions to potential new recruits. Best practices will be shared and extended across Divisions.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
7.4 Outreach to EE-group applicants who withdraw from the application process Stand-up National Recruiting Centre Sept 2013 Follow-up with 100% of people who withdraw Completion Y/N

Finally, efforts will be made to follow-up with individuals from EE-groups who voluntarily leave the recruitment process to both inquire as to their reasons for leaving and encourage them to stay or rejoin. At present, this does not happen and it limits what we know about why they choose to leave.

Potentially, we miss opportunities to reconnect with people who have already expressed interest and invested time in joining our organization.

8. Ensuring the officer cadre is reflective of those they are leading

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
8.1 Renew Officer Candidate Process (OCP) qualified list every two years April 2013: shorten inclusion on list from 4 yrs to 3 yrs Two-year inclusion on list beginning in 2014-2015 Completion Y/N
8.2 Accept OCP applications from individuals in EE groups "out-of-cycle" when appropriate N/A Implemented

Implemented Y/N Statistics on out-of-cycle applicants

8.3 Increased succession planning for senior non-commissioned ranks, starting with EE groups Automation of Talent Management system Use in 2013-14 Talent Management cycle Increased EE in officer candidate process
8.4 All Executives will mentor, COs and Business Line leads will develop future leaders
  • Communication of expectations: Feb 2013
  • Inclusion on 2013-2014 Performance Agreements
100% compliance
  • Success rate of developed individuals
  • PA reporting
8.5 Track Line Officer and CO support of OCP candidates for gender disparities Report and act on disparities starting in this OCP cycle Defensible OCP results Statistics on gender disparities

The RCMP remains committed to merit-based promotion and rejects quotas. We have listened to our membership, especially those in employment equity groups, and they want no part of it. Ideally, the officer corps will reflect the population below it – with a realistic lag for changing demographics. This is our goal.

With that in mind we are making improvements to officer promotion processes in five areas to ensure individuals from EE groups want to apply and, where appropriate, are supported when they do.

The RCMP is committed to advancement on merit and rejects promotion quotas.

First, we have outlined the key qualities of high-potential officer candidates.Footnote 23 This demystifies the requirements and gives everyone a clearer sense of what is being sought in the officer corps.

Second, we are addressing persistent irritants such as mobility. Mobility remains important; however, we recognize that a four-year mobility requirement as a pre-requisite for promotion is in some cases impractical and discouraging. As a result, in the near future, the OCP qualified list will be renewed every two years instead of every four. This will evergreen the list faster and make it easier for individuals to factor in changing personal circumstances when deciding to apply.

Third, we are making it easier for individuals from EE groups to apply by accepting out-of-cycle applications upon the recommendation of a Commanding Officer.

Fourth, we are creating more continuity between the officer and non-commissioned officer processes. Traditionally, these have been essentially distinct from one another. This bifurcation has limited, to an extent, the Force’s ability to effectively identify future leaders and ensure that they get/take a range of assignments that prepares them for officership. Not frequently enough, for example, have high-potential women been encouraged to take assignments that would typically lead to command.Footnote 24 In order to address this challenge, in the coming year, talent management processes will be automated and extended past the officer corps to the S/Sgt and Sgt ranks, starting with individuals from EE groups, for the first-time. Increased efforts will also be placed on mentoring and development of future leaders.

Finally, by ensuring COs and Line Officers are accountable for support/non-support decisions of individuals applying to the OCP. This will be ensured through better tracking of applicants and follow-up by EODR – and it will be reinforced by the heightened talent management described above.

9. Making officer-level promotions more transparent

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
9.1 EODR will publish policy on advertising officer level positions Publication March 2013 Completion Y/N
9.2 Increase national oversight of officer promotion boards Ongoing 100% EODR participation
9.3 Selection boards will include external participation Ongoing Key positions Board composition, including diversity

Table 2: Officer Staffing in 2012Footnote 25

  Promotions Advertised Laterals
D/Commr. 3 1 0
A/Commr. 7 2 7
C/Supt. 15 13 12
Supt. 18 14 42
Insp. 23 18 121

Officer appointments can and will be more transparent. For example, more officer-level promotional opportunities are now advertised.

Between January 1, 2012 and December 7, 2012, 248 officer level staffing process were completed. Approximately 26% were promotional and 73% were lateral moves for individuals already at level.

Lateral appointments, which are generally not advertised, are a key component of the Force’s ability to meet its operational requirements and to ensure the officer cadre has the mix of experience necessary to assume senior executive rank in the future.

In the last year, over 70% of promotions were advertised. This  practice will continue and be formalized, along with additional procedures around officer staffing, in new policy currently under development.

Advertising jobs alone does not make appointments more transparent. The RCMP also seeks the participation of community stakeholders with a diversity of backgrounds for selection processes wherever possible, especially for district, criminal operations and Commanding Officer positions.  This means involvement of individuals from employment equity groups and relevant stakeholders.  In the last year, for example, this has worked successfully in a number of staffing actions including: the Commanding Officers of “B,” “D,” “L” and “V” Divisions, the Officer-in-Charge of Surrey Detachment and the Director-General of the Canadian Police Information Centre.

Similarly, the RCMP has begun increased national involvement in promotion boards in order to ensure balanced processes and to mitigate (real or perceived) local groupthink. This will continue.

10. Retaining Regular Members

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
10.1 Line officers will engage individuals from designated employment equity groups approaching 20 years of service to identify and assist in managing issues that may contribute in extending their service Commence in April 2013 100% engagement Retention rate of EE groups
10.2 Canvass RMs leaving the Force and conduct follow-up interviews where appropriate to better understand reasons for attrition Twice yearly reporting, starting in Sept. 2013 100% follow-up where workplace issues are identified Questionnaire provided to 100% of departing members

The GBA reported that the current annual retention rate in the RM population, once an RM passes the probationary period, is 99% per year. It means that of 100 RMs who graduate from Depot and make it through probation, about 80 will still be RMs in the Force at the end of 20 years.

There are two schools of thought about this fact. The first is that this reality is a laudable expression of the organization’s ability to generate return on its investment of training dollars in members by providing a variety of opportunities over the course of a career. The other is that this rate of retention is surprisingly, possibly troublingly, high – that, over 20 years, life circumstances, opportunities in other organizations, poor performance, and/or other factors ought to create greater attrition than is being seen.

Either way, the reasons why retention rates are high have yet to be fully explored. Whatever the drivers are, they bear examination.

What is at issue in the Gender-Based Assessment and in past reports is the difference in the male and female departure rates after the 20-year mark. Women leave the Force earlier, on average. Women retire, on average, after 25.3 years of service, compared to 32.9 for males.

Over the medium term the Action Items will help build a more welcoming, respectful workplace, and influence retention of women and men. In the shorter term, however, the RCMP will do two things to attempt to decrease attrition of women and other individuals in EE groups.

First, Line Officers will engage employees in employment equity groups as they approach traditional exit points to discuss where they are in their careers, their interests, and what (if anything) might be leading them to leave. This alone might not be enough to convince them to stay, but it may identify things that would. Second, the Force will canvass those who do leave upon their exit to obtain frank feedback as to why. This type of “exit interview” has been recommended before, most recently at Fall 2012 hearings of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Status of Women. This will be an enhanced version of what is already offered voluntarily – a simple questionnaire, followed by discussion with select individuals who raise particular workplace issues or topics of interest.

11. Looking ahead

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
11.1 Develop a strategy to address anticipated demographic challenges Stakeholder consultation 2014 Completion Y/N

The key issue – apart from employment equity– that should drive discussion about the near and medium term composition of the RCMP is the impact that the bulge of 4-7 year members will have on the institution.

Graph 5: Distribution of Regular Members by Years of Service, Projected to April 1, 2013
Source: HRMIS data.

Graph 5 - Distribution of Regular Members by Years of Service, Projected to April 1, 2013. Text description follows.

[Description of Graph 5 - Distribution of Regular Members
by Years of Service, Projected to April 1, 2013
]

Recruiting between 2005 and 2010 created four years of Regular Members who, while making their way through their careers, will have an outsized impact on the human resources of the Force.

These members will hit promotable points together, will look for parental leave around the same time, will age together, and will be older together.

Compounded with the expected lack of promotion opportunities in the near term (due to decreasing Force size and delayed retirement), the Force’s demographics could create significant management challenges, and decrease employee satisfaction, over the next several years.

No forward-looking strategy currently exists. Over the next year, one will be built.

It will include examination of additional progressive approaches to transform the Force to meet the operational and managerial challenges of the future (such as professionalization of the officer corps, direct entry for specialists, post-secondary education requirements, career streaming, non-rank-based recognition, increased investment in certain language skills, and term limits for senior field commands).

Evidence-based decision-making and reporting

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
11.2 Create a dashboard to allow ongoing monitoring of data relevant to EE objectives, including employee satisfaction Deployment of tools to track and report on data impacting HR objectives June 2013 Existence Y/N

We lack consolidated, accurate, widely accessible and reliable data upon which to base HR decisions and to evaluate progress towards our objectives. This undermines our credibility and imperils our strategy. This was highlighted in the GBA and past reviews.  We need to know our workforce better. As a result, the CHRO will, in the coming months, work with other Senior Executive Committee members to deploy business intelligence tools that will provide them and other stakeholders with better information on the RCMP’s progress towards its objectives.

This data will include not just periodic progress updates on the initiatives above but also statistics, such as the Depot throughput, recruit processing time, average length of harassment complaints, and female representation in RM ranks. The first of these reports will be produced in June 2013, and every six months thereafter.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
11.4 Communicate clearly with employees Communications Strategy
  • January 2013
  • Increase percent who agree with questions re: satisfaction on 2014 PSES Survey
  • Strategy engaged
  • PSES 2014 survey job satisfaction questions
11.5 Appoint an advisor to SEC to steer implementation of this plan, coordinate other plans Appointment ASAP Completion Y/N

In 2011, for the first time, all RCMP employees took part in the Public Service Employee Survey. Results varied. In some areas the RCMP did better than the Public Service as a whole, in many areas about the same and, in some, worse.

The results of the PSES identified issues in many of the same areas as the Gender-Based Assessment – in areas like supervision, performance management, training, career development, work-life balance, harassment, leadership, and communications. Using the tools of C-42, building respectful workplaces, balancing work-life better and encouraging communications between employees should address these. The results of the next survey in 2014 will be monitored closely to measure changing attitudes towards job satisfaction.

Graph 6 - Select 2011 PSES Survey Results
Source: Public Service Employee Survey 2011

Graph 6 - Select 2011 PSES Survey Results

[Description of Graph 6 - Select 2011 PSES Survey Results]

Perhaps most telling of all about the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey was that only 33% of RCMP employees, compared to 47% of Public Servants as a whole, agreed that “senior management will try to resolve concerns raised.”Footnote 26

Rhetoric, promises and plans abound. Actions matter. This Plan sets out the Force’s comprehensive, integrated, approach. Execution will decide its effectiveness and define our credibility.

Leadership is important. This cannot be another side project for existing executives. Day-to-day business and parallel plans cannot distract us from our objectives. This requires a senior, consistent, fearless and credible voice. The RCMP is actively seeking to appoint just such a person to oversee the implementation of this plan and to coordinate other plans.

One of his/her tasks will be to ensure other relevant ideas are factored into our approach. Part of that work has been done. Further to the Gender-Based Assessment, the RCMP reviewed the 125 recommendations in the 2006 Employment Systems Review to see which were still relevant and outstanding. Most were implemented or out of date. Less than 10 remain outstanding. Broadly they relate to work-life balance, exit interviews, employment equity targets for the promotion process and the executive ranks, the objectivity of NCO promotions and training. The spirit of them has been incorporated in the Plan above.

Communication with employees is key. It is the RCMP’s intent to release this plan to its employees, recognizing the need to ensure that contracting partners and stakeholders are appropriately engaged as well, as soon as possible.

At the end of recruiting events, we ask people why they want to join the RCMP. From them we have learned that the most important reason people have for wanting to join the RCMP is to be part of a respected national institution.

We recognize that we must continue to evolve our culture and to diversify our composition to maintain that respect.

Appendix – Summary Of Action Items

The table below represents a summary of action items described in the document above.

Action Item Milestone Target Measure
1. Addressing harassment
1.1 Exercise new authorities to enforce accountability, enable early and timely resolution of workplace issues On hold pending Parliamentary approval and Royal Assent of C-42
  • TB Submission for roll-out plan
  • Alignment with new Civilian Review and Complaints Commission
  • Establishment of informal conflict resolution mechanisms, including staffing of coordinators/practitioners
  • Conduct / HR Processes / Staffing Processes Reformed
  • Revised Regulations and Standing Orders published
  • As per legislation, full implementation within 1 year of Royal Assent
  • Reduction in number of complaints
  • Legislation implementation evaluation
  • number of formal complaints
1.2 Reduce average length of complaints through new central oversight and administration of process
  • Impose TBS service standards (March 2013)
  • Benchmark compliance to standards (March 2013)
Compliance with TBS guidelines
  • Avg length to complete steps 1-5 of harassment process
  • Number of complaints.
1.3 Publish new policies and guides
  • Publish interpersonal workplace relationships policy
  • Publish amended harassment policy
  • Publish harassment guides
Completion by March 2013 Completion Y/N
1.4 Expeditiously resolve, wherever appropriate, outstanding harassment-related lawsuits Quarterly review of each case. Resolution of meritorious claims Number of lawsuits
2. Building respectful workplaces
2.1 Use Advisory Committees at the national and provincial levels as key forums for discussion of employee issues
  • Oct. 2012 summit of Committee Chairs
  • Year-end report from National Chairs: March 2013
All Divisions to have functioning Advisory Committees
  • Number of meetings / committee / year
  • Best practices shared
2.2 Establish Respectful Workplace Programs nationwide
  • Inclusion on 2013-14 Performance Agreements of Commanding Officers
  • Rollout of programs
Programs in place by June 2013 Mid-year and annual CO assessment
2.3 Establish a confidential process for employees seeking advice or raising awareness of issues
  • Evaluate BC pilot
  • Launch national process
August 2013

Completion Y/N

2.4 Update the existing mandatory Harassment in the Workplace training Transition to new Learning Management System Dec 2013 Completion Y/N
3. Ensuring transparency and objectivity in promotions
3.1 Return to rank ordering of Job Simulation Exercises for non-commissioned officer exams
  • Employee consultation on short list(s) length
  • 2014 NCO exams
Use in 100% of staffing actions starting April 2014 Completion Y/N
3.2 Creation of a consolidated National Promotion Centre Stand-up April 2013 Completion Y/N
3.3 Audit competency validation boards and line officer selection rationales for fairness and consistency Stand-up of consolidated National Promotion Centre April 2013

Annual reporting

3.4 Educate managers on “fit”
  • Define “fit”
  • Publish revised policy
  • Communication to employees
Completion by Sept 2013 Alignment of fit rationales with definition, according to a directed audit
4. Supporting work-life balance more effectively
4.1 Promote the use of existing work-life balance options where operationally feasible by informing employees and educating managers Commissioner Broadcast Feb 2013 PSES 2014 Survey results
4.2 Design and implement a mechanism for backfilling employees on parental leave, in consultation with contracting partners Discussion at Contract Management Committee 2015 Implementation Y/N
5. Recruiting targets
5.1 Ensure Depot enrollment includes at least 35% women for FYs 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, and approximately 50% thereafter until goal of 30% female population in Force is achieved
  • Ramp up to 50% in FY 2015-2016
  • Distribution of troop data in real-time
30% female RM population in Force in approximately 2025 Statistics
6. Attracting more women and individuals from other employment equity groups
6.1 Focus recruiting efforts for EE groups Direction issued – completed. Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment
6.2 Conduct advertising targeting individuals from EE groups
  • Submission of funding reallocation proposal to Central Agencies
  • Initiate campaign
Completion of campaign Increase in EE applications to the Force
6.3 Ask all RCMP employees to seek out and identify possible recruits from EE groups Educate and provide employees with tools  and information Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment
6.4 Attract qualified EE recruits regardless of where they live Consultation with Contract Management Committee Achieve enrollment goals EE Cadets: Total Depot Enrollment
7. Assisting applicants in joining the Force
7.1 Reduce the average length of an application from approximately 13 to 10 months
  • Stand-up of the National Recruiting Centre: September 2013
  • Identification of options to reduce application time: November 2013
September 2014 Completion Y/N
7.2 Roll-out eRPAT Complete pilot phase and rollout in select locations in 2013-14 Full rollout by 2015-16 Average application processing time
7.3 Offer PARE preparation assistance to potential new recruits Disseminate best practices: January 2013 Innovative preparation initiatives Reduced failure rate on PARE during recruitment
7.4 Outreach to EE-group applicants who withdraw from the application process Stand-up National Recruiting Centre Sept 2013 Follow-up with 100% of people who withdraw Completion Y/N
8. Ensuring the officer cadre is reflective of those they are leading
8.1 Renew Officer Candidate Process (OCP) qualified list every two years April 2013: shorten inclusion on list from 4 yrs to 3 yrs Two-year inclusion on list beginning in 2014-2015 Completion Y/N
8.2 Accept OCP applications from individuals in EE groups “out-of-cycle” when appropriate N/A Implemented

Implemented Y/N Statistics on out-of-cycle applicants

8.3 Increased succession planning for senior non-commissioned ranks, starting with EE groups Automation of Talent Management system Use in 2013-14 Talent Management cycle Increased EE in officer candidate process
8.4 All Executives will mentor, COs and Business Line leads will develop future leaders
  • Communication of expectations: Feb 2013
  • Inclusion on 2013-2014 Performance Agreements
100% compliance
  • Success rate of developed individuals
  • PA reporting
8.5 Track Line Officer and CO support of OCP candidates for gender disparities Report and act on disparities starting in this OCP cycle Defensible OCP results Statistics on gender disparities
9. Making officer-level promotions more transparent
9.1 EODR will publish policy on advertising officer level positions Publication March 2013 Completion Y/N
9.2 Increase national oversight of officer promotion boards Ongoing 100% EODR participation
9.3 Selection boards will include external participation Ongoing Key positions Board composition, including diversity
10. Retaining Regular Members
10.1 Line officers will engage individuals from designated employment equity groups approaching 20 years of service to identify and assist in managing issues that may contribute in extending their service Commence in April 2013 100% engagement Retention rate of EE groups
10.2 Canvass RMs leaving the Force and conduct follow-up interviews where appropriate to better understand reasons for attrition Twice yearly reporting, starting in Sept. 2013 100% follow-up where workplace issues are identified. Questionnaire provided to 100% of departing members
Looking Ahead
11.1 Develop a strategy to address anticipated demographic challenges Stakeholder consultation 2014 Completion Y/N
11.2 Create a dashboard to allow ongoing monitoring of data relevant to EE objectives, including employee satisfaction Deployment of tools to track and report on data impacting HR objectives June 2013 Existence Y/N
11.3 Communicate clearly with employees Communications Strategy

January 2013

Increase percent who agree with questions re: satisfaction on 2014 PSES Survey
  • Strategy engaged
  • PSES 2014 survey job satisfaction questions
11.4 Appoint an advisor to SEC to steer implementation of this plan, coordinate other plans Appointment ASAP Completion Y/N

 


Footnote 1 Between January 1, 2012, and November 30, 2012, 192 complaints were received. Of these, 146 remain active. These 146 ongoing complaints represent close to 90% of all 167 active complaints. Source: NARMS extract, received from 2012-12-04.

Footnote 2NARMS extract, received from 2012-12-04.

Footnote 3Interpersonal deportment describes alleged harassment between two employees where no supervisor-supervisee relationship exists. Alleged actions may include (but are not limited to) humiliating or demeaning comments and/or actions of bullying.

Footnote 4TBS policy is outlined in the Directive on the Harassment Complaint Process and can be found here: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pol/doc-eng.aspx?id=26040&section=text. Preliminary data suggests that the average RCMP complaint remains open for approximately 14 months.

Footnote 5 TBS policy focuses on preventing and stopping harassing behavior through early interventions whereas the current RCMP Act discipline system is adversarial and designed to impose consequences on members who contravene the Part IV of the Act.

Footnote 6 The B.C. program is based on a significant review of the credible literature and writing on the subject of respectful workplaces including over 80 peer-reviewed journal articles; 24 books written by subject matter experts; 10 major studies; and 45 different Respectful Workplace Policies adopted by a variety of organizations including police services, governments, and corporations.

Footnote 7The Job Simulation Exercise (JSE) is used for promotion to Corporal, Sergeant, and Staff Sergeant ranks. The pass rate differs for each, differs from year to year, and differs based on who is eligible to write. In 2008, the pass rates were: Cpl 96%; Sgt 97%, and S/Sgt 92%. Data for 2010 and 2012 is not representative of the full population as only previously unsuccessful test-takers and newly eligible members were required to write, other results were carried forward. In 2014, all 2008 results expire and results on the JSE are expected to return to 2008 levels. Source: Assessment and Research Directorate, JSE Technical Reports 2006, 2008 and Directorate data.

Footnote 8 Short list length, as well as other details of this initiative, will be set following 2013 employee consultations. For discussion, “short lists” will be longer than the Top 5 process used in the past, but smaller than current selection pools.

Footnote 9 Multiple Technical Assessments by the Chief Human Resources Officer “indicate that the JSE exams provide an equal opportunity to all members to demonstrate their job-relevant competencies. The simulation exercises [on which the JSE is based] were developed in a manner that is consistent with legal and professional guidelines, and they provide the RCMP with accurate information for promotion purposes.”

Footnote 10 RCMP National Program Evaluation Services, Gender-Based Assessment (November 9, 2012), 11.

Footnote 11 According to the PSES 2011 Survey, 70% of RCMP women and 68% of RCMP men agree their supervisor supports the use of flexible work arrangements (compared to 75% in the broader Public Service); 74% of RCMP women and 67% of RCMP men felt they had the support to balance their work and personal lives (Public Service 68%); and 59% of RCMP women and 48% of RCMP men reported they can complete their assigned workload during regular working hours (Public Service 69%).

Footnote 12 Beverly Busson, “Women and Policing” in Women in policing in Canada: The year 2000 and beyond – its challenges. Workshop Proceedings.editor: Marcel-Eugène LeBeuf and Julia McLean (1997), 146.

Footnote 13 Lakshmi Ram and Associates, Employment Systems Review (April 2006), 157.

Footnote 14 RCMP Workplace Programs & Services, Assessment & Research Directorate, “RCMP Demographics: HR Issues and Challenges” (2012-09-28).

Footnote 15 “RCMP Demographics: HR Issues and Challenges.”

Footnote 16 This Fiscal Year remains similar. Based on current projections, the RCMP will admit approximately 1400 less cadets than it did in FY 2008-2009. Relative to 2008-2009, the male and female population recruited will have shrunk 83% and 58% respectively.

Footnote 17 “RCMP Demographics: HR Issues and Challenges.”

Footnote 18 It is projected that the total FY 2012-2013 Depot intake will include approximately 135 women and 250 men (roughly 35.1% female), pending finalization of the last of the FY 2012-2013 troops.

Footnote 19 Projections described herein are basic. They may not factor in all relevant variables sufficiently and continue to mature with time. Moreover, scenarios described past two years out are subject to a range of unknown external factors such as demand from contracting partners.

Footnote 20 Between FY 2007-08 and FY 2011-12, the RCMP spent a minimum of $1.75m annually on advertising directed towards recruiting. In FY 2012-13, the RCMP has no authority to run advertising campaigns. Source: RCMP Corporate Management and Comptrollership, “Recruiting advertising expenditures FY2008 to 2012_1.xlsx” and email 2012-12-07.

Footnote 21 Police Services Agreements Section 8.6 commits the RCMP to: “use its best efforts to ensure that the percentage of recruits that are engaged from the Province attains the annual average of the following two percentages: a) the percentage that the number of Members in the Division is of the number of Members in the RCMP; and b) the percentage that the population of the Province is of the population of Canada.”

Footnote 22 RCMP, Gender-Based Assessment, 14.

Footnote 23 EODR, Six Criteria to Identify High Potentials in the RCMP (2012). Broadly, those are excellence in a mix of six areas: Organizational Competencies, Interpersonal Skills, Values and Ethics, Second Language Ability, Willingness to assume leadership, and Mobility to meet Force requirements.

Footnote 24 This has long been highlighted as a challenge both for the Force and for policing in general. RCMP HR Research & Intelligence, “Officer Motivation and Succession Planning: An Empirical Investigation of Senior Management Development in the RCMP,” (February 2002), 17. According to the author: “Women were less likely to have the operational supervisory experience that the organization appears to hold in high regard … The extent to which women are “self-selecting” into these positions, and the degree to which organizational norms impact upon the allocation of human resources are questions deserving of organizational attention.”

Footnote 25 Source: EODR. This table describes officer staffing processes conducted / completed as of December 7, 2012. A number were recently completed and may be awaiting final Governor-In-Council endorsement.

Footnote 26 Public Service Employee Survey 2011, Question 46.