Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2014-15 Departmental Performance Report

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ISSN 2368-0873



The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Minister's Message

As Canada's Minister of Public Safety and Emergency preparedness, it is my responsibility to present to Parliament the Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for 2014-15 as prepared by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). This report accounts for the performance of this agency during the fiscal year against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the RCMP's prior Report on Plans and Priorities (RPPs).

Sincerely,

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister:The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head:Commissioner Bob Paulson

Ministerial portfolio:Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Year of Commencement: 1873

Enabling Instruments:

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

As Canada's national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is a critical element of the Government of Canada's commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Responsibilities

The RCMP's mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • 1 Strategic Outcome: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
    • 1.1 Program: Police Operations
      • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Contract Policing
        • 1.1.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Provincial Policing
        • 1.1.1.2 Sub-sub-program: Territorial Policing
        • 1.1.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Municipal Policing
        • 1.1.1.4 Sub-sub-program: Aboriginal Policing
        • 1.1.1.5 Sub-sub-program: Airport Protective Policing
      • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Federal Policing
        • 1.1.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Drugs and Organized Crime
        • 1.1.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Border Integrity
        • 1.1.2.3 Sub-sub-program: Financial Crime
        • 1.1.2.4 Sub-sub-program: Federal Crime Enforcement
        • 1.1.2.5 Sub-sub-program: National Security
        • 1.1.2.6 Sub-sub-program: Protective Policing
        • 1.1.2.7 Sub-sub-program: Protection Coordination Unit
      • 1.1.3 Sub-program: Technical Services and Operational Support
        • 1.1.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Technical Investigations
        • 1.1.3.2 Sub-sub-program: Protective Technologies
        • 1.1.3.3 Sub-sub-program: Flight Operations
        • 1.1.3.4 Sub-sub-program: Disclosure and Major Case Management
        • 1.1.3.5 Sub-sub-program: Scientific Services/Technologies
        • 1.1.3.6 Sub-sub-program: Operational Readiness and Response
        • 1.1.3.7 Sub-sub-program: Covert Operations
    • 1.2 Program: Canadian Law Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support
        • 1.2.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Integrated Forensic Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.2 Sub-sub-program: Forensic Laboratory Services
        • 1.2.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.4 Sub-sub-program: Science and Strategic Partnerships (Forensic)
        • 1.2.1.5 Sub-sub-program: Criminal Intelligence
        • 1.2.1.6 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
        • 1.2.1.7 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children
      • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Canadian Firearms Program
        • 1.2.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Licensing and Regulations
        • 1.2.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.3 Sub-program: Advanced Police Training
        • 1.2.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police College
        • 1.2.3.2 Sub-sub-program: National Law Enforcement Training
  • 2 Strategic Outcome: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
    • 2.1 Program: International Policing Operations
      • 2.1.1 Sub-program: International Stability and Development
        • 2.1.1.1 Sub-sub-program: International Peace Operations
        • 2.1.1.2 Sub-sub-program: International Policing Assistance and Capacity Building
      • 2.1.2 Sub-program: International Cooperation
        • 2.1.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Operations Support Abroad
        • 2.1.2.2 Sub-sub-program: International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)
        • 2.1.2.3 Sub-sub-program: International Law Enforcement Training
        • 2.1.2.4 Sub-sub-program: International Travel
    • 2.2 Program: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage
      • 2.2.1 Sub-program: Musical Ride
      • 2.2.2 Sub-program: Partnerships and Heritage
  • 3 Strategic Outcome: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death
    • 3.1 Program: Transfer Payments
      • 3.1.1 Sub-program: Members Injured on Duty - Compensation, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) Disability Pension
      • 3.1.2 Sub-program: Survivor Income Plan
      • 3.1.3 Sub-program: RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments
  • 4.1 Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Serious and Organized Crime Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Summary of Progress
What progress has been made toward this priority?
Through awareness, education and enforcement, the RCMP contributed to the disruption of serious and organized crime throughout Canada. In this reporting period, the RCMP successfully disrupted organized crime groups that represented criminal threats at the domestic and transnational levels. Disruptions included the arrests of targets, the seizure or restraint of proceeds of crime and, in some cases, the total dismantlement of the organized crime group. For example, in Project Clemenza, the RCMP-led Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit in Montreal dismantled two sophisticated organized crime groups, which resulted in charges against 48 suspects related to drug-trafficking, assault, extortion, kidnapping, and arson. In Project Confidence, the RCMP, in collaboration with partners including the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal and the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC), laid charges and arrested 20 people, successfully dismantling a major human smuggling operation that brought hundreds of young women into Canada for the purpose of sexual exploitation across the country. In addition, the combined efforts of the RCMP, Vancouver Police Department, CBSA, South African Police Service and the Belgium Federal Police, in a joint investigation that began in 2013 and ended in 2015, resulted in a major disruption of a transnational heroin importation and trafficking network.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
National Security Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Description
What progress has been made toward this priority?
Pursuant to the Security Offences Act, the RCMP leads the Government of Canada's effort to prevent, detect, deny and respond to threats to national security. Relationships with police and security intelligence agencies, whether through integrated and/or cooperative arrangements both domestically and internationally, have resulted in the disruption or prosecution of those who would commit criminal acts jeopardizing Canada's national security. The RCMP's Prioritization Matrix is a system whereby Federal Policing projects are tiered from level one to level three priority. Tier one and two projects are overseen and coordinated by National Headquarters. Notably, over half of the tier one projects are national security investigations. As a result of the sheer amount and complexity of these national security investigations, approximately 600 RCMP personnel were transferred from other Federal Policing priorities to assist the 174 permanent personnel dedicated to national security in 2014–15. These additional resources enhanced the capacity of RCMP-led Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams and National Security Enforcement Sections to address the increased number of investigations. An operational success in this fiscal year was the conviction of Mohamed Hassan Hersi who was found guilty under the Criminal Code for attempting to leave the country to participate in a terrorist activity and for providing counsel to a person to participate in a terrorist activity. This was the first time that an individual was charged and convicted in Canada with the intention to leave the country for the purpose of participating in terrorist activity. In addition to this, four other individuals were convicted of terrorist offences in 2014–15.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Economic Integrity Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Description
What progress has been made toward this priority?
The RCMP continued its fight against economic crime, through the enforcement of laws related to money laundering, proceeds of crime, corruption, counterfeit currency bankruptcy and capital market offences. Proactive educational initiatives and collaboration with law enforcement agencies and financial institutions further contributed to the stability of Canada's economic and political system. Several successful anti-money laundering investigations were concluded during the reporting period, including the disruption of an Alberta-based drug trafficking organization in August 2014. Footnote 1 Intelligence from FINTRAC, along with evidence gathered during the investigation, supported charges including possession of proceeds of crime, money laundering, and drug trafficking. The RCMP likewise made significant gains in investigations related to the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act. In May 2014, Nazir Karigar was sentenced to three years in prison for attempted bribery, the first individual to have been imprisoned under the Act. Footnote 2
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Aboriginal Communities Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Description
What progress has been made toward this priority?
To respond to the needs of Aboriginal communities, the RCMP has conducted comprehensive research to balance prevention, intervention, and enforcement activities. In 2014, the RCMP released a National Operational Overview on Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women. The report provided wide-ranging data to identify characteristics of perpetrators and key vulnerability factors. The organization has focused its prevention efforts in vulnerable communities to reduce violence against women, working closely with partners including the Assembly of First Nations.
The RCMP continued to build and enhance relationships with Aboriginal communities to bolster their safety and overall health. The Community Cadet Corps Program was designed to provide youth with positive social development, leadership, and communication skills in a disciplined environment. The RCMP engaged several communities to tailor the program to their needs, and continued to address funding and resourcing issues to implement the initiative in selected communities. RCMP "F" Division, Saskatchewan delivered several youth-focused programs, including the Aboriginal Shield and Seeing Oneself programs, to enable young people to make informed decisions on alcohol, drugs, and violence.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Youth Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Description
What progress has been made toward this priority?
The RCMP continued to implement innovative and engaging crime prevention activities, with a particular focus on reducing youth victimization and youth involvement in crime. Five primary objectives were identified in the National Youth Strategy: to reduce youth involvement in crime, both as victims and offenders; to support sustainable long-term responses to youth crime and victimization; to support approaches that are consistent with youth justice law; to focus on risk factors, prevention, and early intervention; and to promote youth engagement. In keeping with these objectives, priorities were established that focused on bullying and cyberbullying, impaired and distracted driving, substance abuse, and youth violence.
Guided by the National Youth Strategy, the RCMP hosted the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention, which served as the main online hub for police, teachers and others working with youth to access tools and resources on important social issues. Several social media campaigns and public service announcements were championed to empower youth to make a difference in their communities, including the Leave the Phone Alone campaign in partnership with TELUS and the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association. Moreover, RCMPTalks, a series of live, interactive videoconferences, were held in schools across the country on topics of interest to youth including bullying and cyberbullying. The events allowed students to ask questions of designated guests via video-conference and social media, providing a rich opportunity for dialogue with youth across the country.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Resource Alignment Risk

Given that the RCMP is operating in an environment of fiscal restraint, there is a risk that the organization may not have an adequate structure in place to sustain responsive resource allocation and re-allocation decisions toward the highest priorities which will provide the most efficient and effective use of its resources in support of the RCMP and its desired enterprise-level outcomes

The organization focused efforts on revamping its enterprise-level strategic performance management structure and enhancing governance and oversight mechanisms.
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.1.1 Management and Oversight Services
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.2.1 Human Resources Management Services
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.2.2 Financial Management Services

Changing Threat Environment Risk

Given the shift in operational realities such as globalization, changing demographics, crime typology and access to new technology coupled with aging and compartmentalized data warehouses, the organization may be unable to make critical operational decisions that are based on timely and accurate information in an environment where situational awareness is essential and resources are stretched to capacity.

The organization focused efforts on the re-engineering of Federal Policing, including prioritization of major federal level projects, division level crime reduction strategies, federal policing community engagement, and leveraging key relationships with public partners.

  • Program 1.1 Police Operations
  • Program 1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services
  • Program 2.1 International Policing Operations

Management Practices Risk

Given the size, complexity and diversity of roles employees fill within the organization, those placed in supervisory and management positions may be unable to access timely and consistent learning opportunities and policy support to adequately position them to meet organizational expectations and provide appropriate and timely guidance.

The organization expanded its leadership continuum and focused efforts on providing enriched guidance, support and tools to assist employees in contributing to a respectful and engaged workforce.
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.2.1 Human Resources Management Services

Management of Information Technology Risk

Revolutionary advancement in Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) is continuing to drive the way organizations function. Sustainability of aging IM/IT systems and overloaded and siloed data holdings pose significant risks to meeting administrative and operational requirements.

Emphasis continued on the provision of modern tools and access to immediate, reliable information. The organization continued advancement of its restructured IM/IT program under a national enterprise model.
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.2.3 Information Management Services
  • Sub-sub-program 4.1.2.4 Information Technology Services

The RCMP continued to face increased concerns around terrorism and extremism, changing demographics, and rapid technological advancements, creating a complex and unpredictable operating environment. Initiatives and activities to respond to identified risks were based on four guiding principles: strong governance; efficient use of resources; increased accountabilities; and an emphasis on operations.

The RCMP successfully modernized its strategic performance management structure, streamlining reporting and management of major strategies at all levels of the organization under a single web-based Annual Performance Plan (APP) application. This is aiding the organization in managing its priorities and plans, as well as reporting on progress in achieving established performance objectives. In addition, as part of the renewal of its Investment Plan, the RCMP has designed and implemented a more robust Investment Management Framework to support prioritization of longer term investments in its major asset programs.

The RCMP successfully modernized its strategic performance management structure, streamlining reporting and management of major strategies at all levels of the organization under a single web-based Annual Performance Plan (APP) application. This is aiding the organization in managing its priorities and plans, as well as reporting on progress in achieving established performance objectives. In addition, as part of the renewal of its Investment Plan, the RCMP has designed and implemented a more robust Investment Management Framework to support prioritization of longer term investments in its major asset programs.

The new Federal Policing service delivery model provides a common approach to operations and governance/oversight, allowing the organization to better align resources to federal enforcement priorities, thereby increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of operations. For example, in response to the increased threat of terrorism, the RCMP continued to work closely with local, national and international partners to build on strategies focused on proactive detection, prevention and response to reduce vulnerability to violent extremism. The RCMP leadership continuum expanded its offerings and now includes the Constable Development Program, Field Coaching Program, Supervisor Development Program, Manager Development Program and Executive/Officer Development Program. These programs are designed specifically for RCMP employees to develop leadership skills at all levels and to enhance the organization's ability to deliver on its mandate. A number of initiatives were also implemented that focus on supporting employees in addressing workplace issues, and a mandatory on-line Respectful Workplace course was introduced to raise awareness and identify behaviors and actions that can lead to workplace conflicts.

The IM/IT Program continued its restructuring efforts under a national enterprise model and has matured business planning through the adoption of a logic model methodology. The enhanced use of business intelligence in the RCMP represents a multi-year approach to deliver one-stop access to valuable, accurate and timely information nationally at the strategic, operational and tactical levels to support police operations.

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,625,976,343 2,714,025,288 2,987,881,393 2,861,888,975 147,863,687
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
28,739 28,787 48

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012-13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Police Operations 1,531,403,670 1,588,258,670 1,585,420,286 1,577,463,693 1,750,499,856 1,695,334,830 1,761,000,036 1,913,573,311
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 241,141,544 246,951,544 177,934,590 177,890,590 260,274,414 222,457,415 241,130,536 260,304,114
Strategic Outcome 1 Sub-Total 1,772,545,214 1,835,210,214 1,763,354,876 1,755,354,283 2,010,774,270 1,917,792,245 2,002,130,572 1,173,877,425
Strategic Outcome 2: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
International Policing Operations 54,882,026 55,629,026 52,395,181 52,432,867 57,547,836 52,898,053 53,068,140 61,606,341
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 10,842,331 11,091,331 10,929,545 10,929,545 12,533,858 13,571,003 13,359,752 13,058,519
Strategic Outcome 2 Sub-Total 65,724,357 66,720,357 63,324,726 63,362,412 70,081,694 66,469,056 66,427,892 74,664,860
Strategic Outcome 3: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012-13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Transfer Payments 159,849,131 164,898,076 182,430,125 203,168,538 162,371,322 156,978,125 147,142,744 134,622,883
Subtotal 159,849,131 164,898,076 182,430,125 203,168,538 162,371,322 156,978,125 147,142,744 143,622,883
Internal Services Subtotal 627,857,641 647,196,641 633,013,161 643,213,134 744,654,107 720,649,549 676,679,488 741,234,191
Total 2,625,976,343 2,714,025,288 2,642,122,888 2,665,098,367 2,987,881,393 2,861,888,975 2,892,380,696 3,124,399,359

Note: The RCMP is currently only able to report to the Program level and has developed an implementation plan to be in a position to report on authorities and expenditures to the Sub-sub-program level in the 2015–16 DPR.

The RCMP's actual spending is higher than planned spending by $147.9 million primarily as a result of the 2014–15 Main Estimates increase with in-year temporary funding through Supplementary Estimates and allotment transfers from TBS. The majority of the increase relates to the Operating and Capital carry forwards ($183.4 million) and funding in support of the First Nations Community Policing Services ($41.9 million). These increases were partially offset by a requirement for the RCMP to reduce its spending authorities in 2014–15 as a result of a transfer to Shared Services Canada ($40 million). The above noted funding was not included in the 2014–15 RPP planned spending.

The actual spending was $126.0 million less than total authorities available for use in 2014–15, which included $36.3 million in frozen allotments (funding not available for use in year) and $6.5 million in crown asset disposal proceeds available for use in 2015–16, resulting in an overall real lapse of 2.8%. The balance of $83.2 million results from minor lapses within the RCMP's voted appropriations as follows:

  • Operating Expenditures ($40.6 million) — of the total operating lapse, $6.4 million is within Special Purpose Allotments, primarily related to International Peacekeeping and Peace Operations. The balance of the lapse, within regular allotments, represents 1.7% on a total operating budget of $2.0 billion;
  • Capital Expenditures ($37.1 million) — of the total lapse, $25.1 million relates specifically to the Contract Policing Program. Delays in Provincial and Territorial project approvals to proceed with capital plans, combined with internal and external capacity factors, resulted in the lapsed funding with the Contract Policing Capital Program; and,
  • Grants and Contributions ($5.5 million).

Lapses were offset by not seeking reimbursement of eligible Paylist Expenditures in 2014–15 related to the one-time transition payment, resulting from the Government of Canada's implementation of the Payment in Arrears system.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2014-15 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework Footnote 3 (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014-15
Actual Spending
Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced 1.1 Police Operations Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 1,695,334,830
1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 222,457,415
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally 2.1 International Policing Operations International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 52,898,053
2.2 Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 13,571,003
Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death 3.1 Transfer Payments Economic Affairs Income security and employment for Canadians 156,978,125
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 164,898,076 156,978,125
Social Affairs 1,846,301,545 1,931,363,248
International Affairs 55,629,026 52,898,053
Government Affairs N/A N/A

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 8 7 7
Statutory 512 541 529 461 460 460
Voted 2,612 2,352 2,333 2,181 2,205 2,218

Overall spending in the RCMP is down approximately 1% or $30.5 million in 2014–15 when compared to 2013–14. The year-over-year change is comprised of an increase in spending in Capital Expenditures of $43 million, modest increases in Operating Expenditures and Grants and Contributions, which is offset by a significant year-over-year increase of revenue collection of $92.5 million. As indicated in the 2014–15 third quarter Quarterly Financial Report, the increase in vote netted revenues is largely attributed to Contract Policing and related to two key factors. First, the timing of collections resulted in $32 million in revenue recorded in the first quarter of 2014–15, an amount that was expected to be collected in the fourth quarter of 2013–14. Second, actual revenues were higher due to an overall increase in activities in that program. Additionally, there is an overall decrease to statutory expenditures related to Employee Benefit Plans resulting from a decrease in salary and wages expenditures and a decrease of the employer's contribution rate in 2014–15.

The increase in capital expenditures results from aggressive management of the Capital Vote to ensure that projects were completed and delivered on plan and on budget. Other areas of increase in spending included payments made under the grant to compensate members injured in the performance of their duties, which saw an $11.4 million increase year-over-year. Payments under the grant are expected to continue to increase in the future as a result of the number of members receiving disability pension awards and annual increases due to the indexation of disability pension benefits. These anticipated increases are reflected in future planned spending, together with funding in support of the Federal Infrastructure Program for various projects at detachments in Quebec and Ontario. Other modest increases to planned spending are attributed to funding for renewal initiatives including the National Counterfeit Enforcement Strategy, the Canadian Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy and the proactive reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights.

Overall, the downward trend in spending since 2012–13, as depicted in the Departmental Spending Trend Graph, results from decreases to the RCMP's cost structure and realization of savings measures as announced in the Economic Action Plan 2012.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on the RCMP's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2015, Footnote 4 which is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website. Footnote 5

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Program 1.1: Police Operations

Description

Under the authority of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, this Program provides Canadians with policing services at the federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels and within Aboriginal communities. As described in the RCMP Act, these services include all duties that are assigned to peace officers in relation to the preservation of the peace; the prevention of crime and of offences against the laws of Canada and the laws in force in any province in which they may be employed; the apprehension of criminals and offenders and others who may be lawfully taken into custody; the execution of all warrants, and performing all duties and services in relation thereto, that may, under the RCMP Act or the laws of Canada or the laws in force in any province, be lawfully executed and performed by peace officers; performing of all duties that may be lawfully performed by peace officers in relation to the escort and conveyance of convicts and other persons in custody to or from any courts, places of punishment or confinement, asylums or other places; and performing other duties and functions as are prescribed by the Governor in Council or the Commissioner. This Program contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities in addition to education and awareness activities delivered by employees of the RCMP to the public, businesses and other agencies/organizations within Canada. The RCMP's education and awareness activities — for example information sessions on crime prevention, national security, financial crime, drugs and organized crime — are aimed at reducing victimization of Canadians. Additionally, this Program ensures the protection of designated persons and security at major events which, in turn, mitigates any potential threats to Canada's population. The Program also delivers a high level of technical and operational support to ensure that the RCMP reaches its overarching goal of reducing criminal activity which affects Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,531,403,670 1,588,258,670 1,750,499,856 1,695,334,830 107,076,160
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
21,616 21,501 (115)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's contribution to a safe and secure Canada" 80% N/A Footnote 6
Severity level of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 96 91.74
Per capita rate of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 8,854 8,318.95
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The success of a police organization and the ability to reduce criminal activity relies on several important factors. To measure the reduction of criminal activity affecting Canadians, indicators were selected to represent overall client satisfaction, policereported crime and its severity index.

Public protests against issues such as shale gas and oil pipeline development have become more prevalent. As such, the RCMP has developed and approved an operational framework to ensure that legal protests can occur safely for participants and the wider public. The framework also includes strategies to address the issue of those who would use the existence of legal protest action to commit criminal offences. Specific activity is required before, during, and after a protest event to prevent crime, quickly address criminal acts if they do occur, and enable reconciliation in communities affected by violence and criminality in the wake of protest action. As part of the operationalization of the framework, a "Measured Approach" workshop is being developed to educate front-line members about its philosophy, legal authorities during protest events, and basic conflict resolution strategies. A more substantial course, the "Division Liaison Team Training Course," is also being developed to train selected RCMP members who can be rapidly deployed to the location of potential and active protest events. Moreover, an informative brochure titled "Information on Public Order for Demonstrators" was developed and made available to RCMP divisions across the country. The document outlines the rights and responsibilities of demonstrators in protest and demonstration situations as well as the roles and responsibilities of police.

The RCMP placed significant focus on reviewing the incidents of June 4, 2014 in Moncton, NB, where three RCMP members were killed and two were wounded. An independent review concluded with 64 recommendations which the RCMP accepted. These recommendations fell under five broad themes: supervision, training, technology and equipment, communications, and aftercare. As mandated by the Canada Labour Code, two other reviews were also launched, one by the Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Team and another by Employment and Social Development Canada. The RCMP is committed to examining any additional recommendations these reports may have and incorporating them as appropriate.

Sub-program 1.1.1: Contract Policing
Description

This Sub-program addresses the law-enforcement needs of provinces/territories, municipalities and Aboriginal communities across Canada by providing policing services to all provinces (except Ontario and Quebec), three territories, over 180 municipalities and Aboriginal communities under the terms of the Police Service Agreements (PSAs) between Public Safety Canada and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. The PSAs consist of the Provincial Police Services Agreement (PPSA), the Municipal Services Agreement (MPSA) and the Community Tripartite Agreement (CTA) where costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial/territorial and municipal governments. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws including, most notably, the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

The RCMP contract policing model is an effective means to address the cross-jurisdictional evolving nature of crime and provide consistent policing services to Canadian communities. This Sub-program provides communities with an effective, highly trained police service which can seamlessly investigate local priorities that may have linkages to provincial, national and international investigations. Having this pool of highly trained police officers from one end of the country to the other enables the RCMP to quickly and successfully supply a large contingent of resources — which can respond rapidly to frontline emergencies and critical incidents — and to conduct investigations as well as enforcement and prevention, community policing and crime reduction activities.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadians have access to quality provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal policing services under the RCMP contract Percentage of contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 7
RCMP weighted clearance rate 42.12 42
RCMP traditional clearance rate (not weighted) Over 48 38.03
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, work continued on the RCMP's national strategy to reduce the number of impaired drivers on Canadian roadways. The strategy focused on increasing public awareness and organizing enforcement initiatives across divisions, with special attention paid to the growing concern of drug-impaired driving. The RCMP held three national impaired driving enforcement days during the year and worked closely with the Department of Justice to explore new tools to facilitate the detection and identification of drug-impaired drivers. Three roadside oral fluid screening devices were purchased by the RCMP and are being tested by the Canadian Society of Forensic Science's Drugs and Driving Committee (DDC). The research is being undertaken in partnership with the DDC, the RCMP and the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, and will determine if the devices are suitable for use in the Canadian policing environment. The RCMP also continued to update its training programs, including the Standardized Field Sobriety Test training and courses for Drug Recognition Expert training.

As part of its enhanced service delivery, the RCMP continued recruitment for the Community Constable pilot program. Applicants were processed throughout 2014–15 in anticipation of forming the first troop at the training academy in Regina during the fall of 2015. Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories participated in the first phase of the program. Once trained, these community constables will complement and support the work of regular members, with a primary focus on crime prevention/reduction and community engagement. The RCMP also initiated a national review of the policy governing RCMP auxiliary constables, who are unpaid volunteers recruited to perform community policing and crime prevention duties. While auxiliary constables are trained in numerous use of force options, they do not carry a firearm. The policy review was initiated following several high profile events involving unarmed uniformed personnel, including the shooting of a Canadian Armed Forces ceremonial guard at the National War Memorial and the shooting of an RCMP auxiliary constable at a casino in St-Albert, Alberta.

Resources were dedicated throughout the year to review and modernize policies, training, and equipment to align with emerging technology. The RCMP completed a review of patrol carbine training, surveying over 18 Canadian police agencies on their respective patrol carbine operator courses. The RCMP's course was delivered over five days, and covered information on the firearm itself (assembly, cleaning), shooting proficiency, and drills to review its use, including the transition to a pistol in the event of a carbine stoppage. Additionally, revisions were made to Immediate Action Rapid Deployment (IARD) training, which will be mandatory for all regular members. This training prepares for the swift and immediate deployment of law enforcement resources to ongoing, life threatening situations, to be used when members are responding to volatile situations in which they cannot rely on traditional time lines and response methods, such as the deployment of Emergency Response Teams.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.1: Provincial Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of provinces by providing policing services to all provinces (except Ontario and Québec), under the terms of the Provincial Police Services Agreement (PPSA) between Public Safety Canada and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. Costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial governments. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws, including most notably the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadians have access to quality Provincial policing services under contract Percentage of Provincial contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 8
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As outlined in the PPSAs signed in 2012, the RCMP continued to work with Public Safety Canada and policing jurisdictions to enhance accountability. The relevancy and timeliness of content in Divisional Multi-Year Plans were priorities for the Sub-sub-program, and these plans, along with financial reports, were created using the same structure to ensure consistency across the organization. Formal written acknowledgement of the plans was received from all but two partners, which was an improvement over previous years.

Keeping in mind the individual needs of Canadian provinces, projects were undertaken throughout the year in consultation with stakeholders and partners. In "F" Division, Saskatchewan, the RCMP took part in the "Building Partnerships to Reduce Crime" strategy, which involved an initiative to establish multi-agency situation tables (or "Hubs") to deliver interventions to at-risk individuals and families. Over the last year, capacity has grown to 11 active Hubs at which the division is represented. "F" Division also developed a strategy to identify youth under the age of 12 who are at-risk, to ensure these individuals are referred for appropriate services. The U12 strategy was also designed to include a process of referral elevation, should the youth continue to have contact with the law enforcement community.

There were numerous initiatives undertaken throughout the year in RCMP jurisdictions across the country. For example, "J" Division, New Brunswick, continued its implementation of a new service delivery model. Crime reduction units and alternate response units were created in each district, and a return to basic policing has allowed for greater communication and contact with urban and rural communities. This new approach has allowed for a clearer identification and remediation of community needs, while providing a greater understanding and appreciation of the RCMP and its members. The model has increased the extent of intelligence-led enforcement, which has assisted with a reduction in property crimes and victimisation.

In "B" Division, Newfoundland, the Construction Zone Enforcement Initiative was undertaken as a result of discussions with the Department of Transportation and Works, the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, and various other stakeholders. The Balancing Safety Needs group focused on three pillars to create a safe highway system: safe work practices; education; and enforcement. Regular traffic law enforcement activity was established in construction zones, which underscored three prime areas of concern: inconsistent signage; physical setup of road construction zones; and public education/perception. It is anticipated that the work conducted by "B" Division's Traffic Services members will result in further changes and improvements to the overall safety of those who build and maintain the province's road network.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.2 Territorial Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of the territories by providing policing services to three territories, under the terms of the Territorial Police Services Agreement (TPSA) between Public Safety Canada and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. Costs of policing services are shared by federal and territorial governments. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Territorial laws, including most notably the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Territorial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadians have access to quality Territorial policing services under contract Percentage of Territorial contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 9
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to modernize its relationship with territorial governments, with a focus on strengthened governance and accountability. In 2014–15, initiatives were developed to address territorial priorities as determined by respective Ministers of Justice. Communities were consulted in the development of annual performance plans, which serve as the RCMP's internal performance management and planning process that sets forth objectives, initiatives, and risks. In "G" Division, Northwest Territories, communities were involved in the development of detachment policing priorities through the annual performance plan process. Every community-identified priority was noted on the Detachment Monthly Report, which provided monthly updates on how the priorities were addressed. This consultative process ensured that priority areas were addressed in individual communities with a view to increasing satisfaction with RCMP services.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.3: Municipal Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of municipalities across Canada by providing policing services to over 180 municipalities under the terms of the Municipal Police Service Agreements (MPSAs) between Public Safety Canada and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. Costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial/territorial and municipal governments; cost-share percentages are based on population. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws, including most notably the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadians have access to quality municipal policing services under contract Percentage of Municipal contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 10
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Municipal Policing remained committed to building on existing contractual arrangements, working with partners to meet service delivery needs regardless of size and structure. Economies of scale continued to be realized by all contractual partners, which better positioned the RCMP to respond to changing needs, unforeseen challenges, and the complexities associated with keeping Canada and Canadians safe.

In "K" Division, Alberta, feedback from contract partners was gathered twice annually during the conventions for Alberta Urban Municipalities and the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties. Their concerns were addressed in a timely fashion, and ongoing communication with municipalities proved crucial to overall success.

In response to the 2014 Auditor General's report on the First Nations Policing Program, Footnote 11 "F" Division began a two-year pilot project to re-profile duties in three detachments in northern Saskatchewan. In conjunction with the North District, service delivery is being enhanced with an emphasis on crime prevention in selected communities. These efforts are being put in place to help communities that are currently receiving policing service as a result of Community Tripartite Agreements.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.4: Aboriginal Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides enhanced policing services to address the policing needs of Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal peoples under the terms of the Community Tripartite Agreements and the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP). Costs are shared by federal, provincial/ territorial and municipal governments, as well as First Nation communities; cost-share depends on the selected agreement. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws, including most notably the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws. This includes the Aboriginal Community Constable Program (ACCP) which is an enhanced services legacy program administered by Public Safety Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Safer and healthier Aboriginal Communities Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal Communities"

Aboriginal Canadians: 80%

Aboriginal Leaders: 80%

Contract Policing Clients: 80%

N/A Footnote 12
Proportion of Aboriginal people who reported being victims of crime in a 12 month period TBD 37%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To respond to the needs of Aboriginal communities, the RCMP conducted comprehensive research to balance prevention, intervention, and enforcement activities. Throughout the year, the organization offered cultural awareness and sensitivity training for frontline RCMP officers and employees. These developmental initiatives emphasized Aboriginal culture, spirituality, and perceptions of law and justice. The RCMP also continued to build and strengthen new and existing partnerships with Aboriginal communities at the municipal, provincial/territorial, and national levels, including the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC).

On May 16, 2014, the RCMP released a National Operational Overview on Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women, which represented the most comprehensive collection of data that has ever been assembled by the Canadian policing community on this important subject. Footnote 13 This report presented a comprehensive data analysis involving a file by file review of historical incidents. Areas of action identified as a result of the operational review included: enhancing efforts on unresolved cases; focusing on prevention/intervention efforts; increasing public awareness; and strengthening data. Based in part on the data collected, the RCMP identified characteristics of perpetrators and key vulnerability factors of victims, which continued to guide RCMP prevention initiatives to reduce victimization of women and girls at the community level.

RCMP officers have been engaged and provided with tools and funding to work with communities in developing and delivering violence prevention initiatives. The RCMP is promoting the implementation of locally developed initiatives, and has also established prevention programs such as the Aboriginal Shield program, a youth-driven initiative that provides substance abuse prevention and healthy lifestyle coaching to Aboriginal communities. More recently, the RCMP produced a public service announcement video featuring Canadian singer and Aboriginal celebrity Shania Twain, who spoke on the issue of family violence. Footnote 14 In partnership with NWAC and the AFN, the RCMP also created three awareness poster campaigns Footnote 15 that address family violence and missing persons.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.5: Airport Protective Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides police presence at Vancouver, Edmonton, Halifax and Winnipeg airports, under the terms of the Aeronautics Act and the Department of Transport Act. Police officers respond to emergency calls for service at Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) screening points and throughout the airport to protect travelers and transportation infrastructure. This Sub-sub-program is funded by relevant airport authorities.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The needs of airport policing clients are met Percentage of airport policing clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is responsive to my organization's needs" 75% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Sub-sub-program remained responsive to the needs of Canadians and their expectations of enhanced public safety. In 2014–15, administrative resources were added to augment service delivery to airports policed by the RCMP. In October 2014, the Winnipeg Airport Authority contracted the RCMP to provide service for the James Richardson International Airport, thus the total number of airports policed by the RCMP remains at four. Footnote 16 The Sub-subprogram has worked with its clients throughout the year to ensure satisfaction with the RCMP's response to airport needs, which has reflected positively on its annual performance.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Federal Policing
Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act and the RCMP Regulations, this Sub-program enforces federal laws and protects Canada's institutions, national security, and Canadian and foreign dignitaries. Federal Policing preserves public safety and the integrity of Canada's political and economic systems. The RCMP investigates serious and organized crime, economic crime (including corruption) and terrorist criminal activity. It also enforces federal statutes, collects criminal intelligence, conducts criminal investigations, secures Canada's borders and ensures the safety of major events, state officials, dignitaries and foreign missions.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Delivery of Federal Policing programs across Canada Federal Statute Crime rate per 100,000 403.77 Footnote 17 389.97
Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's delivery of Federal Programs" 85% N/A Footnote 18
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Federal Policing focuses its efforts on areas of highest risk. The Prioritization Matrix was introduced to prioritize files at the divisional and national level, which allowed for the efficient transfer of investigative resources to areas of high risk. Such efforts have enabled the Sub-program to address operational priorities more efficiently and effectively.

Federal Policing responded to major events in 2014, including two terrorist incidents in October 2014, which triggered a drastic increase to the number of terrorism-related investigations. As a result, personnel were re-allocated from other areas (e.g., organized crime and financial crime investigations) to support high-risk investigations, resulting in a number of successful disruptions and charges against subjects of interest. The incidents of October 2014 also initiated significant changes for the RCMP's Protective Policing, which included increased responsibility for security of the Parliamentary Precinct. While counter-terrorism activities became the most significant priority for the Sub-program, work continued in all other areas of the Federal Policing mandate. Several of these operational successes are documented throughout this report. The RCMP improved its engagement efforts by adopting a more strategic approach in line with Canadian domestic and foreign policy priorities. Internally, processes were implemented to improve information sharing and collaboration with other government departments and agencies. Enhancements were made to border security, which included: advancing RCMP commitments under the Canada-US Beyond the Border Action Plan: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness; researching options to enhance the RCMP's suite of border technology capabilities via the Border Integrity Technology Enhancement Project (BITEP); and finalizing the CBSA-RCMP Joint Border Strategy. Footnote 19

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.1: Drugs and Organized Crime
Description

This Sub-sub-program combats organized crime and drug-related activities through implementing intelligenceled police operations in partnership with a variety of domestic and international partners. It also works in partnership with domestic and international agencies to reduce the impact of organized crime activities and substance abuse issues through prevention, education and awareness. It also comprises a research and operational support component to enhance the effectiveness of these investigations and operations.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced impact of organized crime Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is reducing the threat and impact of organized crime" 80% N/A Footnote 20
Disruption of the number of significant organized crime identified in National Threat Assessment (NTAs), Provincial Tactical Assessment (PTAs), or as National Tactical Enforcement Priority (NTEPs) 70 N/A Footnote 21
Drug crimes are investigated Percentage of drug crime file clearance rate TBD 67.2% Footnote 22
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through awareness, education, and enforcement activities, the RCMP contributed to the reduction of serious and organized crime throughout Canada. Several organized crime groups representing threats at the domestic and transnational level were disrupted, which included the arrest of targets, the seizure or restraint of proceeds of crime, and, in some cases, the total dismantlement of the crime group. For example, in Project Clemenza, the RCMP-led Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit in Montreal dismantled two sophisticated organized crime groups, which resulted in the arrest of 33 suspects on charges related to drug-trafficking, assault, extortion, kidnapping, and arson.

Gains were also made on the RCMP's priority to combat human smuggling and trafficking. In Project Confidence, the RCMP, in collaboration with partners including CBSA, the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, and FINTRAC, disrupted a major human smuggling operation that brought hundreds of young women into Canada for the purpose of sexual exploitation across the country. The Human Trafficking National Coordination Centre (HTNCC) initiated Project Safekeeping, which conducted a national assessment of domestic human trafficking for sexual exploitation. A human trafficking component was added to the RCMP's cadet training curriculum at Depot Division in Regina, SK, and at the Canadian Police College. Additionally, the HTNCC provided training to approximately 80 police officers through the online human trafficking investigator course.

Illicit drug activity in Canada is a multi-faceted problem that requires a broad-based and integrated approach. The RCMP continued to implement the Marihuana Grow Initiative which seeks to reduce the number of illicit grow operations in Canada. The RCMP partnered with the Department of National Defence (DND) in an annual multi-jurisdictional marihuana eradication program known as Project Sabot. Additionally, the Sub-sub-program continued to support Health Canada in reforming the medical marihuana regime.

Lastly, the RCMP completed its implementation of the Anti-Contraband Force, comprised of 50 RCMP resources dedicated to combating the smuggling of contraband goods. RCMP resources were deployed strategically to areas of high smuggling activity, with a focus on the contraband tobacco supply chain. Two major projects, Project Debit (Manitoba) and Project Lycose (Quebec), culminated in arrests, charges under the Excise Act 2001, and the seizure of over 950,000 contraband cigarettes, 40,000 kilograms of fine-cut tobacco, firearms, currency, and vehicles. Nationally, the RCMP was involved in 223 contraband tobacco seizures, which represented a 10% increase in the number of seizures from 2013.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.2: Border Integrity
Description

This Sub-sub-program supports Canada's ability to manage its borders through leveraging partnerships to implement intelligence-led police operations in the detection and investigation of border breaches between the ports of entry and along Canada's coastlines. While contributing to the secure and effective international movement of people and goods, it also identifies and investigates criminal organizations which threaten the security of Canada's borders within, at or away from its borders.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's borders are protected from criminality Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is a valuable partner in protecting Canada's border"

Partners: 85%

Stakeholders: Baseline to be established

N/A Footnote 23
Number of organized crime groups involved in cross-border crime disrupted by or with support from Border Integrity units 15 N/A Footnote 24
Reduction in the number of organized crime groups involved in cross-border crime Number of arrests and seizures as a result of Shiprider TBD

Arrests – 6

Charges – 5

Seizures – 8

Number of systems successfully connected to increase "between the ports" communication 2 2
In consultation with US law enforcement, the number of priority sensor gaps identified and the number of priority sensor gaps for which remedial measures have been developed TBD

Priority gaps – 0

Remedial measures – 0

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the RCMP advanced several key border initiatives. It fulfilled its commitments under the Beyond the Border Action Plan by conducting cross-border maritime law enforcement (Shiprider) operations, improving domain awareness, and working towards radio interoperability. The RCMP is currently focusing efforts on the BITEP to improve the RCMP's border technology capabilities in Quebec and Ontario, as announced in Budget 2014. The Sub-sub-program also finalized the first Joint Border Strategy with CBSA.

Under the Shiprider program, the RCMP and the United States Coast Guard (USCG) work together to seamlessly enforce the law on both sides of the border in shared waterways. Three training sessions were offered during the fiscal year to prepare for the addition of two new Shiprider units in Niagara and in the Kingston–Cornwall corridor in 2015–16. Moreover, in April 2014, the RCMP and USCG signed the regional standard operating procedures for eastern region Shiprider surge operations. By placing Canadian and US law enforcement officers on a single patrol vessel, Shiprider not only leverages law enforcement resources but also provides the operational flexibility required to interdict suspect vessels across jurisdictions, removing the international maritime boundary as a barrier to law enforcement. While engaged in operations, participating officers are subject to the laws of the host jurisdiction.

During the fiscal year, a joint working group comprised of the US Department of Homeland Security, US Customs and Border Patrol, USCG, Public Safety Canada, RCMP, Transport Canada, and Canadian Coast Guard completed an inventory of land-based technology capabilities, as set out in the Domain Awareness action item under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The inventory highlighted two areas to be addressed: the lack of detection capabilities for low flying aircraft; and limited detection capabilities for small vessels in areas of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the East Coast. A working group of core operational partners from both countries has begun to develop a process to jointly prioritize gaps and identify remedial measures.

The Beyond the Border Action Plan also commits the RCMP to support the implementation of a binational radio interoperability system between Canadian and US border enforcement personnel to improve the coordination of binational investigations and timely responses to border incidents. In 2014–15, Detroit/Windsor and Blaine/Vancouver were interconnected with this binational radio system.

Finally, during the fiscal year the CBSA-RCMP Joint Border Strategy was finalized. The Strategy sets out these organizations' collective understanding of the border threat environment, strategic objectives, as well as an approach for improving collaboration and cooperation at all levels.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.3: Financial Crime
Description

This Sub-sub-program helps maintain the integrity of the Canadian economy by protecting Canadians, their governments and financial systems from financial crimes committed by criminal organizations and others. It works in close partnership with domestic and international partners to take enforcement action and deliver awareness and prevention services against national and transnational financial crime activities.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced impact of economic crime Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is reducing the impact of economic crime" 80% N/A Footnote 25
Position of Canada in the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) Top 10 10
Canadians are made aware of how organized crime impacts them financially Percentage of Canadians who received information from the RCMP, and who responded "yes clearly" or "yes vaguely" to the statement "The information made them more aware of ways in which they can avoid being the victim of financial crime (e.g., fraud, identify theft, etc...)" 60% N/A Footnote 26
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Sub-sub-program continued to focus its efforts on investigations related to National Tactical Enforcement Priorities, which cover threats by individuals and groups involved in money laundering, terrorist financing, and other criminality. Financial criminal intelligence was essential to the approach undertaken by the RCMP. Several successful anti-money laundering investigations were concluded during the reporting period, including the disruption of an Albertabased drug trafficking organization in August 2014. Footnote 27 Intelligence from FINTRAC, along with evidence gathered during the investigation, supported charges including possession of proceeds of crime, money laundering, and drug trafficking.

In June 2014, the Greater Toronto Area Financial Crime Unit charged 11 Ontarians after over 150 international investors lost $4.4 million in an elaborate investment scam. Footnote 28 The RCMP received assistance for this investigation from the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC), FINTRAC, and the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

The RCMP likewise made significant gains in investigations related to the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act. In May 2014, Nazir Karigar was sentenced to three years of imprisonment for attempted bribery, the first individual to have been imprisoned under the Act. Footnote 29 In February 2015, the RCMP's National Division laid charges against the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. for criminal acts that surfaced as part of the ongoing criminal investigation into the company's business dealings in Libya. Footnote 30

In addition to enforcement action, the Sub-sub-program spent considerable time and effort on awareness initiatives and partnership development. International anti-corruption units expanded their outreach through university-delivered programs, and RCMP employees presented to over 2,000 individuals domestically and internationally on topics of financial crime. The RCMP also participated in the International Foreign Bribery Task Force operational meeting with representatives from the FBI, City of London Police, and the Australian Federal Police, in an effort to share experiences and enhance collaboration in related investigations.

The RCMP moved forward with its new integration and co-habitation model for Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMETs). This new approach has brought together RCMP members with provincial securities commissions and local law enforcement, allowing for enhanced consultation on identified cases and investigational approaches. Closer coordination with the OSC comes two years after the OSC launched a smaller joint serious offences team (JSOT) in cooperation with the RCMP and the Ontario Provincial Police, which allowed the regulator to lay more fraud charges in court using the criminal powers of its law enforcement partners. Since its creation, JSOT has executed over 80 search warrants, has eight matters under investigation, and an additional 12 before the courts.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.4: Federal Crime Enforcement
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides comprehensive criminal investigative services to federal government departments and agencies. The Sub-sub-program is responsible for conducting intelligence-led and reactive investigations into violations of federal statutes including those relating to financial loss of the federal government; public safety and consumer protection; transportation safety and security; environmental protection and Canada's international obligations such as crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide. This Sub-sub-program contributes to increasing public confidence in the integrity of federal programs and services.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Reduced impact of federal statute crime on Canadians Other Federal Statute Crime Rate per 100,000 population TBD Footnote 31 79.78
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, the Sub-sub-program coordinated the implementation of several government statutes and regulations, using a combination of proactive and reactive strategies. In partnership with Health Canada and CBSA, the RCMP participated in INTERPOL's Operation PANGEA VII, a two-week coordinated blitz that pursued the online trade of counterfeit pharmaceuticals. With nearly 200 enforcement agencies representing 111 countries, the operation targeted the international black market of fake and illicit medicines, leading to 237 arrests and the seizure of $36 million (USD) in counterfeit and unlicensed medicines. Moreover, with implementation of the Combating Counterfeit Products Act, the RCMP took a lead role in the development of a coordinated approach to address intellectual property crime, engaging partners in regulatory and law enforcement agencies and seeking input from private sector interests.

The Sub-sub-program also assisted other government departments and agencies with a number of diverse requests, including a Pedigree Act complaint from Newfoundland and an odometer tampering case from Quebec. Federal Policing participated in meetings with the Canadian Natural Resources Law Enforcement Chiefs Association to strengthen the RCMP's knowledge of environmental, wildlife, and endangered species crime. Moreover, the Sub-sub-program worked closely with Parks Canada, lending expertise in training, use of force, policy, and safety equipment while also coordinating efforts for a series of dives to the wreckage of the HMS Erebus from the Franklin Expedition.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.5: National Security
Description

This Sub-sub-program conducts criminal investigations into offences related to domestic and international terrorism. The RCMP counters the criminal threat to the security of Canada, its citizens and institutions, under the authority of Sections 7 and 83 of the Criminal Code of Canada, the Security Offences Act, and section 2(c) of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act. The RCMP conducts national security criminal investigations to detect, prevent, deny and investigate: terrorism and terrorist financing; threats to the security of Canada; threats against protected persons; threats to critical infrastructure; proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear incidents; the unlawful release of sensitive or classified information; piracy; offences against diplomats; protection of nuclear material; and torture.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Terrorist criminal activity is prevented, detected, responded to and denied Number of disruptions, through law enforcement actions, to the ability of a group(s) and/or an individual(s) to carry out terrorist criminal activity, or other criminal activity, that may pose a threat to national security in Canada and abroad 6 N/A Footnote 32
Critical infrastructure information and intelligence products are created and delivered to stakeholders and partners Number of reports forwarded to private sector stakeholders and other partners to increase their situational awareness on threats 200 862 Footnote 33
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through the RCMP's law enforcement mandate, individuals were disrupted from carrying out criminal activity that posed a threat to national security. Cooperation with a number of domestic and foreign law enforcement organizations, as well as security and intelligence agencies, allowed the RCMP to prevent, detect, deny, and respond to threats to national security. According to the RCMP's Prioritization Matrix, over half of the RCMP's Tier 1 files, which are given national oversight and coordination, were related to national security investigations. Consequently, the number and complexity of these investigations have had an impact on RCMP resources. In 2014–15, in addition to 174 permanent full time employees, approximately 600 resources were seconded from other Federal Policing priority areas to enhance the capacity of Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams, National Security Enforcement Sections, and Federal Policing units.

The issue of individuals seeking to travel abroad to participate in terrorist activity remains a concern to the RCMP, as these individuals represent a threat to Canada, its allies, and the overall international community. In January 2014, the RCMP established the High Risk Traveller Case Management Committee (HRTCM), a forum comprised of representatives from various government departments and agencies to review individual cases and establish options to respond to and mitigate threats. The National Security Joint Operations Centre (NSJOC) evolved from the interagency HRTCM and is staffed full time by representatives of several departments and agencies. The NSJOC is a venue for facilitating real-time information exchange between government departments and agencies and for assisting in the coordination of an appropriate response to manage high-risk travellers and other high-risk individuals. The NSJOC supports the Detect and Deny elements of the Government of Canada's Counter-Terrorism Strategy. Since the formation of the NSJOC, the RCMP has managed more than 100 high risk traveler investigations. Operationally, the Sub-sub-program marked a significant milestone with the conviction of Mohamed Hassan Hersi, who was found guilty under the Criminal Code for attempting to participate in a terrorist activity and for providing counsel to a person to participate in a terrorist activity. This was the first time an individual was charged and convicted in Canada with the intention to leave the country for the purpose of participating in terrorist activity. Four other people were convicted ofterrorist offences in 2014–15.

Furthermore, the RCMP enhanced existing preventative strategies and products and is developing the Terrorism Prevention Program to raise awareness about the radicalization to violence. The program is being designed to provide first responders with the ability to identify national security threats at the earliest possible stage, with emphasis on proactive rather than reactive approaches.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.6: Protective Policing
Description

Under authority of the RCMP Act and RCMP Regulations, this Sub-sub-program provides security services for Canadian government executives (the Governor General, his family and residences, the Prime Minister, his family and residences); visiting heads of state and foreign diplomats in Canada and their residences; internationally protected persons (IPPs); persons designated by the Minister of Public Safety as requiring security. Through the Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program (CACPP), it places covert, tactical operatives, known as In-Flight Security Officers (IFSOs) on board select domestic and international flights. This Sub-sub-program is necessary in order to protect identified 'at-risk' flights, maintain certain landing rights for Canadian air carriers and, on behalf of the Government of Canada, it routinely assesses and validates foreign IFSO programs prior to the placement of their IFSOs on flights destined to Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Protectees are protected Percentage of protectees who responded that they were satisfied with the level of service provided by Protective Policing 80% N/A
Number of incidents that threatened the safety of RCMP protectees 0 1
Sites are protected Number of incidents that threatened the security of Canadian interests 0 1
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, Protective Policing continued to play a lead role within the Canadian law enforcement community by researching evolving technologies and sharing information on standardized tactics. The Sub-sub-program worked closely with policy makers to address security gaps created by rapidly evolving technologies, such as Unmanned Aerial Systems. As Chair of the Association of Personal Protective Services, the RCMP led efforts within the protective policing communities to explore and improve collaboration during visits by Internationally Protected Persons. Operationally, Protective Policing oversaw several successes in 2014–15, including visits from the heads of states of Australia, France, Germany, South Korea, and Ukraine.

To enhance the capacity and capability of the Sub-sub-program, the CACPP signed a number of international IFSO agreements with government partners. Of significance, the Montreal Protocol amended the Tokyo Convention, making specific reference to IFSOs and recognizing them as a distinct category of individuals aboard a plane with authority to intervene and protect the aircraft and people aboard. Such developments have expanded the operational reach of the Sub-sub-program, and increased the use of IFSO teams to address High Risk Traveller files overseen by the RCMP and public safety stakeholders.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.7: Protection Coordination Unit
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides major event security planning, guidance, and oversight to divisional planners responsible for delivering security and protection services for events hosted by the Federal Government. Security planning subject matter experts aid divisional planners by developing specific event software platforms and reference material as well as delivering "hands on" operational assistance. The RCMP mandate to secure these types of events comes from the Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act, the Security Offences Act, the RCMP Act and RCMP Regulations, the Criminal Code of Canada as well as common law. This Sub-sub-program also provides coordination and file management for centralized security and protection during Royal Visits, Federal Cabinet meetings and official party leaders during Federal Elections.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government-led high profile events are secured Percentage of events successfully secured 100% 100%
Percentage of incidents that compromised Canadian interests at a major event 0% 0%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Protection Coordination Unit had several operational successes in 2014–15, including visits from the Earl and Countess of Wessex, the Duke of York, the Princess Royal, and the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall. The RCMP continued to provide support and guidance to the Ontario Provincial Police by helping to develop and implement a security concept operation for the 2015 PanAm Games. Support was also lent to Sports Canada through the coordination of a threat assessment for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The Sub-sub-program's expertise in major events continued to be called upon by other government departments and international partners. For example, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Development's (DFATD) international outreach commitment offered RCMP expertise to assist with security preparations in advance of the 2014 Francophonie Summit held in Senegal. As the lead security agency, the RCMP assured the overall security of the Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Summit in Toronto, and provided protection to designated Internationally Protected Persons in attendance. Further, in its role as a security liaison, the RCMP provided assistance and support to the Canadian delegation during the Commonwealth Games held in Glasgow, Scotland.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Technical Services and Operational Support
Description

This Sub-program encompasses a variety of special investigative services in addition to researching, developing, deploying and integrating a broad assortment of investigative tools, techniques, methodologies and equipment required by the RCMP and its law enforcement partners to prevent and investigate criminal activity. It also offers operational support, advice, management, policy and training to ensure the availability of technical tools and specialized expertise.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technical services are provided to policing operations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The technical services/operational support received was of a high quality" 80% 75%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, Technical Services and Operational Support underwent an internal restructuring, designed to enhance integration and program alignment. Technical Investigation Services identified efficiencies, aligned common activities, and reduced redundancies, leading to the development of a new organizational structure. Moreover, the national Departmental Security Branch (DSB) continued to undergo a transformation, moving to a risk-based approach to prioritize and address internal and external demands. Such efforts improved efficiency and accountability, and DSB was able to meet the increased demand for employee screening under the cadet recruit modernization initiative. However, this meant that other security screening initiatives were delayed. From an accountability perspective, the Sub-program made advancements in developing a framework and implemented a business intelligence tool to report on performance to assist with national reporting expectations.

Such endeavours were part of a coordinated response to internal audits and assessments conducted over the past few years. Recommendations from the Technological Crime Program audit were implemented, and included a business intelligence tool for reporting purposes. Footnote 34 The Laboratory Information Management System within the Technological Crime Program continued to be developed with particular focus on statistical reporting. In October 2014, Transport Canada was invited to conduct an advisory assessment of RCMP Air Services facilities in Ottawa. Eight observations were recommended that would improve Air Services compliance with Canadian Aviation Regulations, some of which were immediately instituted as they did not involve additional costs. Other recommendations will be addressed in the coming fiscal year due to software and personnel requirements.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.1: Technical Investigations
Description

This Sub-sub-program ensures the availability of state of the art technological tools and procedures for the RCMP and other law enforcement agencies to assist in the investigation of criminal and terrorist activities. This includes the lawfully authorized interception of communications, covert entry, pure computer crime, Internet intercepts, seizure and forensic analysis. In addition, it also ensures the expertise regarding the criminal use of Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear substances and Explosives (CBRNE). Program funds are expended on personnel, technology, systems, operations and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Tools, techniques and specialized expertise are provided to policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the tools, techniques and specialized expertise provided to law enforcement agencies 80% 75%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Technical Investigations continued to provide important tools, techniques and specialized expertise to internal and external law enforcement partners. During the reporting period, the RCMP released its first report on cybercrime. Footnote 35 This report covered a broad range of criminal offences where the internet and information technologies were used to carry out illegal activities. It described select crimes in Canada's digital landscape to show the rising technical complexity, sophistication, and expansion of cybercrime. The RCMP began drafting the cybercrime strategy, which is expected to be released in the fall of 2015. To strengthen the fight against cybercrime, the RCMP deployed a member to the Joint Cybercrime Action Taskforce (J-CAT) at Europol. The J-CAT, which is being piloted for six months, will coordinate international investigations with partners working side by side to take action against key cybercrime threats and top targets, such as underground forums and malware, including banking Trojans.

Moreover, Technical Investigations assisted on 331 national security and serious crime investigations using lawfully authorized intercept capability. Provisions for the law enforcement community to obtain judicial authorization to conduct electronic surveillance of private communications for criminal investigations are set out in Part VI of the Criminal Code. Pursuant to this legislation, the RCMP obtained 74 applications for federal authorization/video warrants, through which 283 installations were performed. Footnote 36 These endeavours identified a total of 26 different categories of offences to the Criminal Code and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

Technical capability was also provided to 200 federal and provincial projects for aerial, foot, and vehicle surveillance. Approximately 3,100 requests for service were received in 2014–15, 75% of which were addressed by the RCMP's surveillance program. Footnote 37 Due to capacity limitations, only the highest priority files are serviced. Requests not serviced by the respective RCMP division surveillance units are returned to the originating RCMP requesting unit.

Lastly, CBRNE Operations, which is integrated with the Ottawa Police Service, responded to 74 calls regarding suspicious packages, powders, and devices in the National Capital Region (NCR). The CBRNE Police Service Dog unit received 135 calls to conduct VIP related services. The Canadian Bomb Data Centre received approximately 783 calls for service and/or inquiries for explosives-related incidents in Canada. CBRNE Operations recorded 14 Radio Frequency Counter Measure deployments in the NCR and RCMP divisions. Electronic countermeasures capability is provided to the RCMP to prevent the remote activation of Improvised Explosive Devices or the communication between criminals or terrorists during a crisis situation. The Sub-sub-program provided seven first responder CBRNE courses for law enforcement across the country, with a total of 234 policing members completing the course.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.2: Protective Technologies
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides technologies and systems to protect individuals and assets for which the RCMP is responsible. This entails the deployment and implementation of electronic / mechanical security systems for the protection of Internationally Protected Persons and Very Important Persons at over 175 sites, major events (G8, North American Leaders' Summit), undercover members, witnesses, safe houses, crime scenes, exhibits and sensitive operational sections of the RCMP. Program funds are expended on personnel, technology, systems, corporate security, assets, operations and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
RCMP technologies and systems protect individuals and assets Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the electronic/mechanical/physical security systems provided by Technical Operations 70% 71.4%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Protective Technologies has continued to advance work in the areas of evolving technologies and systems to enhance law enforcement and protect individuals and assets. A contract was established in 2014 for the procurement of in-car digital video systems, which will incorporate video and audio recording capabilities for police cars. In consultation with the RCMP's IM/IT Program, the Sub-sub-program continued to develop an enterprise solution for the storage of video data. Collaboration also continued with DSB with regard to body-worn video and the potential for wireless data transfers from police cars. In addition, an audit of procurement and use of in-car video was conducted during the reporting period. Recommendations from the audit focused on improving communications and directives on the use of in-car video to the divisions. The directives are to be aligned with the IM/IT Program's strategy for the long-term management of digital video data.

The Sub-sub-program continued to implement the five-year Corporate Security Amalgamated System (CSAS), an enterprise-wide approach for RCMP facilities and assets including panic alarms, intrusion detection, and access control through secure smart cards. During the reporting period, employees of the RCMP were issued a new smart card in preparation for the migration to the new system. Protective Technologies received 38,137 transaction requests regarding the CSAS within the NCR, which included the installation and maintenance of 1,012 card readers, 956 intrusion zones, and the management of over 24,000 secure access smart cards. In 2014–15, the RCMP ran a pilot project with Shared Services Canada (SSC) in which three facilities within the NCR were added to the CSAS. Partner results from SSC have led to a negotiation of a long-term engagement.

Further initiatives were undertaken under the Perimeter Security Project, which was designed to introduce new and technologically advanced types of physical security for Parliament Hill. A number of armoured guard booths were installed to enhance and support existing bollard systems to restrict and control vehicular access. The RCMP also enhanced video surveillance systems providing video coverage for all buildings on Parliament Hill. These endeavours will help protect frontline police officers, members of the House of Commons, the Senate, and the general public who are visiting the Hill.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.3: Flight Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides direct operational and administrative air service to RCMP frontline police officers, other government departments and law enforcement agencies. This Sub-sub-program is necessary, as it helps prevent and investigate crime and ensures the security of individuals. The RCMP has a fleet of 40 aircraft (including 31 fixed wings and 9 helicopters). Sub-sub-program funds are expended on personnel, security, assets, operations and maintenance of aircraft.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Airborne capacity supports policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the flight services provided by Air Services 85% 90%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, Flight Operations flew a total of 15,796 hours, which amounted to 2.6 million miles flown. Approximately 11,215 hours were devoted for federal, provincial, and municipal investigations, which includes transportation of prisoners, exhibits, passengers, surveillance, border patrol, search and rescue, missing persons, and ERT call-outs. The remaining 4,581 hours were flown for RCMP business. Footnote 38

In 2014–15, an internal evaluation was conducted by the RCMP. Footnote 39 The evaluation aimed to provide senior management with a neutral, timely, and evidence-based assessment of the Sub-subprogram, including an analysis of its ability to provide services in a cost-efficient manner and an assessment of the use of resources against current need. The evaluation was national in scope and covered a three-year period between April 2010 and March 2013.

Six key recommendations were made, and the management team proactively implemented a number of critical activities to address the findings. A national conference was held in November 2014 to establish a vision, expectations for the national fleet, new governance procedures, and the standardization of regular reporting and communication. Flight Operations was restructured, a number of key positions were staffed, and roles and responsibilities were redefined with regard to national leadership, program oversight, and accountability. Long-term recommendations will continue to be addressed by the Sub-sub-program in future reporting cycles.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.4: Disclosure and Major Case Management
Description

This Sub-sub-program develops, implements, and promotes a standardized method in using an electronic major case management system that is in line with existing record management policies. This Sub-sub-program is necessary as it ensures proper disclosure of all information gathered by police during the course of an investigation. Disclosure and Major Case Management provides operational support internally to the RCMP, as well as to integrated partners across the country.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Electronic major case management (eMCM) and disclosure support policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with support received in relation to eMCM and disclosure TBD N/A Footnote 40
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As a result of Federal Policing Re-Engineering, the Subsub-program was divided into two distinct units: Electronic Major Case Management and Disclosure Support. Both units have spent several years working with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada to implement a web-based disclosure pilot project. This initiative was undertaken to examine the efficiency and financial value of web-based disclosure, as compared to conventional disclosure methods by hard drive or paper. While the project experienced some delays, the RCMP continued on the path of automating processes with tools and technologies related to major case management. In 2014–15, issues related to security and systems compatibility were resolved, and it has since been confirmed that the server will accept RCMP data. A formal agreement between external partners is still being negotiated. The RCMP's Information Management Renewal Program has identified electronic disclosure as a priority project for the next three to five years, which would address disclosure aspects of all major cases.

The Sub-sub-program also engaged in discussions with FINTRAC to align processes in an attempt to automate the transfer of disclosure information between the two organizations. FINTRAC procured an analytical tool for this purpose, and the RCMP has worked to identify requirements to simplify the intake process. With the foundational work completed during the reporting period, it is expected that the new automated process could be fully implemented in 2016–17.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.5: Scientific Services/Technologies
Description

This Sub-sub-program offers analytical tools, systems and scientific methodologies to enhance criminal investigations through the study of criminal activity. It encompasses specialized operational and analytical investigative capabilities for Canadian and international policing communities with services including Criminal Investigative Analysis, Geographic Profiling, Polygraph and Statement Analysis. Sub-sub-program funds are expended on personnel, operations, technology, assets and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Analytical capabilities study criminal activity to support criminal investigations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the specialized investigative analytical capabilities provided by Technical Operations 85% 65.6% Footnote 41
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Representing a 50% increase over the last fiscal year, the RCMP's Criminal and Geographic Profiling Unit received 129 requests for assistance with investigative techniques. These requests ranged from interviews and interrogations to threat assessments, linguistic analysis, linkage analysis, and statement analysis. Techniques were used in a range of investigations, which included homicides, abductions, bombings, threat cases, child exploitation, sexual assaults, hostage takings, arson, extortion, and several unsolved serial crimes.

The Sub-sub-program was also responsible for the Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System (ViCLAS), which was designed to assist specially trained investigators to identify serial crimes and criminals by focusing on the behavioural linkages that exist among crimes that may have been committed by the same offender. Since its inception in 1994, ViCLAS has grown as a national and international program. The program currently has 120 full-time employees at ViCLAS Centres across Canada. Seven ViCLAS Centres are operated in the RCMP, one by the Ontario Provincial Police, and another by the Sûreté du Québec. Since its implementation in 1995, ViCLAS has been adopted by nine foreign countries and has become the international standard for automated case linkage systems. In 2014–15, approximately 25,000 new cases were entered into the system, bringing the total to 491,705 cases since its creation. During the course of this same time period, 4,711 cases were analyzed by ViCLAS specialists, which resulted in 286 confirmed links between offenders and occurrences.

Furthermore, improvements were made throughout the year to the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR) database, a national registration system for sex offenders who have been convicted of a designated sex offence and ordered by the courts to report to police. In 2014–15, the database was improved with updates also made to administrative fields and errors/bugs fixed. To date, over 38,000 offenders have been entered into the NSOR database, with 719 tactical queries performed in fiscal year 2014–15. Additionally, the RCMP's Truth Verification Section conducted 849 forensic polygraph examinations, analyzed 678 veracity questionnaires, and composed 50 written statements for operational files. In support of national recruiting efforts, 2,390 pre-employment polygraph examinations were completed. The 33 polygraph examiners located throughout Canada were used as interviewers for numerous murder and high profile investigations across the country, including the murder of three RCMP members in Moncton and the shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill in October 2014.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.6: Operational Readiness and Response
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides a central point of contact for emergency management and incident response across the RCMP, ensuring a coordinated and timely response to any emergencies, critical incidents, or disasters; (maintaining specialized teams and resources such as Emergency Response Teams, Emergency Response Medical Teams, Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear (CBRN) responders, Crisis Negotiators, and Incident Commanders.) This includes the National Operations Centre, a fully secure and integrated command and control centre for centralized monitoring and co-ordination during critical incidents and major events. The Business Continuity Planning and Emergency Management focuses on preparedness and workforce resilience as mandated by the Emergency Management Act.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The RCMP is prepared to respond to all-hazards emergencies and critical incidents Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is prepared to respond to emergencies and critical incidents" 80% 45% Footnote 42
Percentage of federal exercises identified appropriate for RCMP participation where RCMP participates 100% 100%
Business Continuity Plans cover all RCMP services and assets Percentage of RCMP employees covered by a Business Continuity Plan 100% N/A Footnote 43
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP has advanced its emergency management programs to align with present-day policing probabilities. Recent emergency events helped identify certain gaps and inefficiencies that continue to be addressed. During the year, operational guidelines for Ebola outbreaks were developed and delivered to divisions, and specific emergency plans, such as for rail disasters, were generated. Best practices and lessons learned, as well as recommendations, were submitted following the Alberta floods of June 2013. An interactive Emergency Response Operations Guide was also created to provide guidance and important checklists for frontline personnel. The electronic guide can be uploaded to most smartphones.

In 2012, the RCMP completed an audit on Business Continuity, which provided four recommendations to improve oversight, monitoring, and quality assurance. Footnote 44

Since then, the organization has worked to implement the audit recommendations and a recent internal report recognized the challenges, efforts, and milestones that have been realized thus far. The Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Policy Section and Divisional BCP Coordinators continued to offer support to members across the country, working to ensure plans were completed and validated. Each and every employee is covered by a National Plan in the event of a disruption, and each detachment has a BCP in place. Throughout the reporting period, all forcewide critical services and assets were identified, down to the Sub-program level.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.7: Covert Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides support and direction to operational field units for high risk programs such as Undercover Operations, Source Development, Witness Protection and Human Source Programs. This Sub-subprogram is necessary to ensure proper oversight, accountability, training and backstopping requirements leading to successful investigations and the safety of police officers. It is also crucial in the application and management of source witness protection measures as they are applied to witnesses, informants and police agents pursuant to the Witness Protection Program Act and the use, handling and recruiting of police informants and agents in the context of operations and major investigations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Covert operation policy direction, program oversight and training are provided to divisions Percentage of internal clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "We are satisfied with covert operations services provided" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 45
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In December 2014, the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act received Royal Assent, leading to its enactment in March 2015. The Act contained several amendments that ensured the same type of information currently available to law enforcement remained available, thus accounting for evolving technology including computers, mobile devices, and the internet. The Act brought significant changes that were relevant to legal applications under Part VI and XV of the Criminal Code. More specifically, it codified the practice of obtaining omnibus authorizations to intercept private communications, provided new investigative tools to preserve data, created several new specific production orders, created two thresholds for tracking warrants, and replaced the traditional dialed number recorder by a warrant for a transmission data recorder. The Legal Applications Support Unit communicated these changes within the RCMP and updated training material accordingly. The Sub-subprogram also participated in amending the National Wiretap Precedent to assure alignment with the Act's new provisions, as well as to satisfy service providers when obtaining subscriber information associated to telephone numbers.

Program 1.2: Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Description

This Program provides the Canadian law enforcement community with the necessary scientific, technical, investigative and educational support to deliver proactive, intelligence-based policing and law enforcement services to their respective communities and partners. Additionally, this Program provides educational opportunities to members of the Canadian law enforcement community to enable them to develop their skills thus increasing their effectiveness in contributing to a safer Canada. This Program is necessary to ensure that Canadian law enforcement communities have access to the required tools, systems, technologies (i.e., forensic support and expertise, criminal intelligence and firearms registry and databases, etc.) and education which, in turn, will contribute to the reduction of criminal activity affecting Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
241,141,544 246,951,544 260,274,414 222,457,415 (24,494,129)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,989 1,818 (171)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technical, forensic, investigative and educational activities support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "overall the RCMP provides high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 46
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canadian Law Enforcement Services provides support services to police organizations across Canada, commonly referred to as National Police Services (NPS). NPS is guided by an advisory committee and it regularly consults with Federal, Provincial, and Territorial governments. In 2014, representatives from all levels of government provided input for the NPS Charter, which defined the vision, mandate, and guiding principles for NPS. The Charter set out the roles and responsibilities of providers, partners, and stakeholders, and formalized the governance structure that was established with the creation of the NPS National Advisory Committee (NPS NAC).

It is crucial that law enforcement agencies support NPS and agree that they are receiving high quality, affordable, and timely services. With this view, a survey was developed in 2014–15 that will be distributed to senior members of the Canadian law enforcement community. Responses to the survey will be used to detect areas within NPS that should be improved, and will identify the challenges faced when accessing support services.

During the reporting period, improvements continued to be discussed at NPS NAC with emphasis given to the modernization of Canada's civil and criminal record information system. Support was given to the transition of civil criminal records checks to a fully electronic and biometric-based system, which will deliver fast and accurate civil criminal records checks to the Canadian public.

Work also continued in 2014–15 to address the financial sustainability of NPS. For example, an analysis of costs at the Canadian Police College (CPC) was completed, and in response, the CPC will implement a new fee structure to align tuition with the cost of course delivery. Several additional initiatives will be ongoing in future fiscal years as part of the NPS Renewal and Sustainability Initiative, which addresses issues of mandate, governance, and funding.

As part of its efforts to modernize NPS, the Government of Canada entered into new ten-year Biology Casework Analysis Agreements with provinces and territories for forensic DNA analysis services provided by the RCMP beginning in 2014–15. These new agreements provide a long term sustainable source of funding for this critical policing service through the regular review and adjustment of provincial and territorial payments to ensure they remain aligned with both the demand and costs for DNA analysis services.

Sub-program 1.2.1: Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support
Description

This Sub-program encompasses a variety of special investigative services in addition to researching, developing, deploying and integrating a broad assortment of investigative tools, techniques, methodologies and equipment required by the RCMP and its law enforcement partners to prevent and investigate criminal activity. It also offers operational support, advice, management, policy and training to ensure the availability of technical tools and specialized expertise.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Scientific, Technical and Investigative services support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "Overall the RCMP provides high quality Scientific, Technical and Investigative services" 80% N/A Footnote 47
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the Sub-program continued to make improvements to scientific and technical services made available to law enforcement and the Canadian public. The consolidation of laboratory services across Canada was completed, which reduced costs and improved the efficiency of support to investigations. The RCMP likewise moved from the analysis to the implementation of Phase 1 of the civil screening criminal record check project. In the long term, these projects will lead to more rapid communication between police services, citizens, and the RCMP for criminal record information, and will reduce errors caused by people with similar names and dates of birth.

The IM/IT Program, formerly known as the Chief Information Officer Sector, collaborated with the Canadian Police Information Centre to explore a replacement system for the Police Information Portal (PIP). Such work will ensure that critical information is shared among law enforcement agencies and criminal justice partners. Additionally, the RCMP examined alternatives to modernize the Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS) to allow for information and intelligence sharing in the area of serious and organized crime.

The Sub-program also made significant gains in the development of a DNA-based Missing Persons Index. In collaboration with Public Safety Canada, the RCMP led the development of legislative amendments to the DNA Identification Act, establishing a legislative framework for the new program. In 2014–15, the RCMP engaged with relevant stakeholders on the development of new regulations and an operational framework to guide this new investigative tool. The DNAbased Missing Persons Index, as announced in Budget 2014, will become operational in 2017.

The RCMP relies heavily on highly-trained experts to deliver forensic and technical services. The sustainability of the Forensic Identification Services (FIS) discipline was identified as a critical priority for the organization. During the reporting period, a comprehensive initiative was designed to examine and improve the training, service delivery model, and resource forecasting aspects of FIS. This program will be evaluated against the rate of qualification for forensic identification specialists in coming fiscal years.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.1: Integrated Forensic Identification Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program is necessary to ensure that the RCMP, in all jurisdictions, provides consistent high quality crime scene examinations, such that the analysis and comparison of all physical and impression evidence located and evaluated meets or exceeds the standards that the courts expect from forensic opinion evidence. Specifically, the Sub-sub-program establishes, implements, monitors and improves all necessary policies, standards, processes, tools, technology, training, best practices and health and safety directives for Forensic Identification. These include crime scene forensic examinations, identification and collection of exhibits for scientific analysis, fingerprint analysis, footwear impression comparisons, tire track comparisons, forensic facial imaging analysis, forensic video analysis and disaster victim identification. In addition, this program commands front line operational units across Canada for bloodstain pattern analysis investigation, chemical biological radiation nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) crime scene investigation, and forensic, scientific and aerial reconnaissance imaging.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Integrated Forensic Identification Services provide support services to front line operational officers Percentage of latent fingerprints found during case examination identified to individuals with a criminal record 40% 35%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Science and technology development remained a top priority for the Sub-sub-program. Vacuum Metal Deposition (VMD) technology was proposed in 2013–14 as part of a national strategy to process and yield clear prints on polymer banknotes. In 2014–15, installations were completed in Montreal, QC; Newmarket, ON; and Surrey, BC; thus making the technological improvement available through a regional sharing model. Subsequent use of VMDs in casework proved to be effective at detecting latent fingerprints on cold case exhibits that had been in storage for several years.

Across Canada, members of FIS were successful at identifying latent fingerprints found at crime scenes to individuals in an average of 35% of cases. Typically, scenes associated to property crime provide the highest yield of fingerprints. For example, FIS achieved results of 44% for 'break and enter' offences whereby individuals were incriminated by fingerprints.

Several factors contributed to the decline in the rate of identification of crime scene prints across the country. Resource availability in divisions and a decline in the rate of qualification of new FIS members led to a decreased level of resources. Furthermore, scenes involving crimes against persons are considered a priority, which decreased the level of resources available to address property crimes. The Sub-sub-program will continue to address these issues in future fiscal years. A mentorship program continued with university students on a variety of research projects relevant to operational issues. Integrated Forensic Identification Services also represented Canadian concerns on forensic identification in international and national scientific working groups.

In 2014–15, the Sub-sub-program, in partnership with the RCMP National Forensic Laboratories, commenced a study of the feasibility and effectiveness of portable DNA analysis technology for use in an operational setting. The technology would allow bloodstain pattern analysts to determine whether crime scene stains originated from the same or different individuals, and would provide more timely feedback to investigators. In addition, phase one of a study on the impact of decontamination techniques on physical evidence was completed in 2014–15 in partnership with Canadian, American, and Australian partners. Successive phases of the study, which will include research into the decontamination of physical evidence contaminated by specific chemical and biological agents, will continue in future fiscal years.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.2: Forensic Laboratory Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program supports police investigations through the provision of forensic analysis of exhibit materials used as evidence. This involves the examination, interpretation and reporting of evidence related to physical and/or biological material exhibits from, or pertaining to, a crime scene or criminal investigation. It ensures that the processes used for forensic analysis are scientifically valid and reliable and are based on the application of the scientific method. Support is provided to evidence related to biology services (i.e. DNA analysis), document and counterfeit examinations, trace evidence, explosives, toxicology, and firearms.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Timely forensic laboratory services support the policing and criminal justice system Percentage of forensic laboratory service requests completed by target time, by program 85%

Biology: 51%

Firearms: 32%

National Anti-Counterfeiting Bureau: 30%

Toxicology: 70%

Trace Evidence: 84%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Forensic Laboratory Services continued to improve the effectiveness of its service by enhancing the analysis of exhibit material and by leveraging new scientific and technological developments. Biology Services implemented a new kit for DNA analysis which provides more discriminatory results and allows for the analysis of more challenging samples. In addition, a new process was developed to streamline the examination and analysis of evidence in sexual assault cases to improve the timeliness of service. The firearms unit established a live link between the Canadian Integrated Ballistics Identification Network and the National Integrated Ballistics Information Network in the US to allow direct checks of suspect firearms against unsolved crimes in both countries. Moreover, the toxicology unit evaluated and acquired new instrumentation to perform multi-drug screening from a single extract which, when combined with improvements to current methods under development, will make the process more efficient and help improve processing times.

The RCMP also completed the consolidation of its Forensic Laboratory Service from six sites to three with the official closure of the Halifax Laboratory on March 31, 2015. The consolidation was undertaken to improve efficiency and reduce duplication and infrastructure costs. The process was designed to minimize impact on service delivery to client agencies, and prior to consolidation, a firearms unit was established in Ottawa and new toxicology units were formed in Ottawa and Edmonton, AB. Scientists were recruited to fill both actual and anticipated vacant positions, and targeted training of new hires and cross-training of existing specialists were undertaken to develop a flexible workforce capable of responding to changing client and workload demands. Such efforts have had a positive effect on service delivery during the reporting year; however, the full impact will not be felt until training is completed in 2016–17.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.3: Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides direct operational support on a 24/7/365 basis to the Canadian law enforcement, criminal justice and public security communities as well as international partners such as the FBI and INTERPOL for criminal, civil and immigration purposes. The Sub-sub-program maintains Canada's national repository of criminal records and biometric (fingerprint) information. The Subsub-program is responsible for maintaining and making accurate and up-to-date criminal record information available to authorized agencies in accordance with federal laws. Criminal record information is used by the Canadian law enforcement community in support of combating crime and by authorized agencies for civil purposes, such as conducting civil screening for employment, volunteer work, adoption requests and vulnerable sector checks, among other noncriminal purposes. In addition, the Sub-sub-program conducts fingerprint-based criminal record checks for civil screening purposes, including vulnerable sector checks. Sub-sub-program services include, but are not limited to: criminal record and fingerprint identification; maintaining criminal records in accordance with federal laws; identifying latent fingerprints; supporting Government of Canada immigration and border management programs; analyzing biometric IT solutions; and measuring performance for client service delivery.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technology used by the national repository of fingerprint and criminal record information supports Canadian law enforcement Number of devices sending electronic fingerprint submissions to RTID 950 1,155
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) continued to work on increasing the efficiency and quality of service provided to external and internal stakeholders. The Sub-sub-program assisted agencies with the migration to electronic submission of criminal and civil fingerprints, offering expertise with workflows, training, analysis, and technology options and considerations. To date, 1,155 Electronic Fingerprint Capturing Devices are sending submissions, exceeding the performance target by 21.5%. With the hub concept, which allows police services to submit fingerprints to the system on behalf of law enforcement that may not have the technology, a total of 1,200 agencies across Canada now have the capability of submitting fingerprints electronically.

Work advanced on the Criminal Justice Information Modernization (CJIM) project, which, once completed, will provide a sustainable service to allow up-to-date reporting for criminal record information to CCRTIS. The project will also allow information to be retrieved from CPIC in near real time. The pilot phase for the CJIM Web User Interface began in March 2015. For criminal charges submitted electronically with an Electronic Fingerprint Capture Device, contributing agencies were able to report their dispositions electronically. The CJIM pilot will conclude in February 2016, and will include police services from various federal, provincial, and municipal jurisdictions.

Furthermore, CCRTIS initiated Phase 1 of the Civil Screening Modernization plan that will lead to full biometric-based criminal record information transactions for Federal Government employment applications.

Lastly, the Sub-sub-program has designed an activity-based costing approach to the various work processes undertaken in CCRTIS. Its implementation will ensure that service models for critical activity centres are efficient, effective, and economical. Likewise, CCRTIS will be able to accurately determine a cost for each transaction type.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.4: Science and Strategic Partnerships (Forensic)
Description

This Sub-sub-program maintains the National DNA Data Bank (NDDB) and assists law enforcement agencies by using DNA evidence to link crime scenes and to link crime scenes to convicted offenders. This Sub-sub-program provides science and technical review and strategic advice to senior management on all matters of science and technical issues involving the Forensic Science and Identification Services mandate and operations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The National DNA Data Bank supports criminal investigations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The National DNA Data Bank contributes value to criminal investigations" 80% 85%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The NDDB, managed by Science and Strategic Partnerships, is integral to the evolving nature of criminal investigations. During the reporting period, two new scientific DNA direct analysis processes were fully integrated with a new laboratory management system to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the NDDB. Footnote 48 The new processes and their integration has shortened processing times and achieved a successful first pass processing of 98.5% of all samples received by the Data Bank. New records were set in 2014–15, with the NDDB reaching 34,000 convicted offender total hits and a 75-day average minimal time to achieve 1,000 hits. These statistics represent an average processing time from receipt of sample to upload in the NDDB of less than nine days.

The Standards Council of Canada renewed the ISO 17025 accreditation of the NDDB, which validated the implementation of new processes introduced throughout the year. Footnote 49 To fulfill operational requirements for criminal investigation casework, as well as the future of the missing persons DNA program, the NDDB directed the development and validation of new Y-STR markers. Footnote 50 In 2014–15, the Sub-sub-program also spent a considerable amount of time planning, consulting, and drafting the new legislation to amend the DNA Identification Act, which will create Canada's first national missing persons DNA program.

The NDDB's processes rely on the proper collection and submission of samples. To this end, direct client training was provided throughout the year, both on-site and through remote videoconferencing. This training was provided to a total of 395 participants in three provinces and three territories, representing a wide variety of police investigators, Crown counsel, military police, and courthouse staff.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.5: Criminal Intelligence
Description

This Sub-sub-program, as an integral part of law enforcement operations, is focused on the provision of comprehensive, timely assessments of criminal organizations and their activities with the goal of providing actionable intelligence aimed at more effectively controlling, reducing and preventing organized and serious crime in all communities across Canada. An intelligence-led approach to operations also serves to assist in the development and implementation of effective public policy, crime reduction and prevention strategies.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Information sharing is essential to intelligence-led policing Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "To combat organized crime there is a need to improve and promote information sharing practices between agencies" 80% N/A Footnote 51
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to improve its ability to collect, analyze, and disseminate criminal intelligence in support of police operations. In 2014–15, analysts were deployed internationally to countries of operational significance to proactively identify criminal threats and emerging trends which could impact Canada, Canadians, and Canadian interests. These coordinated operational and intelligence efforts led to the detection of key strategic linkages between Canadian organized crime groups and organized crime groups operating abroad. What is more, the National Intelligence Coordination Centre (NICC) developed a framework to coordinate and disseminate intelligence using a collaborative platform, which has increased the timeliness and relevance of information and intelligence-sharing throughout the RCMP. A cyber team was also established within the NICC, which has improved the RCMP's ability to make stronger links between cybercrime and other criminal domains, including organized and financial crime. Whether tactical, operational, or strategic, criminal intelligence enabled the RCMP and other Canadian police forces to set priorities and allocate resources based on the most significant criminal threats to Canada.

Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) and its law enforcement partners have continued to strengthen the alignment between intelligence and operations. During the reporting period, CISC provided timely and accurate assessments on criminal organizations and trends to inform priority setting, consistent with the Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime. CISC's products became standing items during priority-setting exercises, in forums including the RCMP's National Integrated Operations Council, the Canadian Integrated Response on Organized Crime (CIROC), and the Organized Crime Committee of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP).

Recognizing the transnational nature of organized crime, CISC and CIROC championed the application of the Third Party Rule to ensure balance between the need to share and the need to protect the integrity of operations and methodologies. Under the Third Party Rule, law enforcement personnel share information for intelligence purposes with a mutual understanding that the information will be protected and not further released or acted upon without the consent of the originator. In support of this endeavour, CISC put forward a resolution to the CACP to have members review the rule's application and reaffirm the principle within their own organizations.

To facilitate and improve information sharing, CISC adopted new tools to enhance ACIIS, its national database on serious and organized crime. Significant strides were also achieved in the implementation of the Integrated Information Service database, a platform to facilitate access to ACIIS information and to other RCMP databases. Moreover, CISC began the process of determining the feasibility of granting ACIIS access to CBSA. This initiative will strengthen border security and enhance collective efforts to combat serious and organized crime.

Consistent with its national communications strategy, CISC continued to revitalize its profile and brand with stakeholders, promoting intelligence-led policing and educating these stakeholders about the benefits of information sharing to combat the multi-jurisdictional nature of serious and organized crime. In partnership with provincial bureaus, CISC provided training to member agencies on the National Intelligence Officer course and enhanced the common threat assessment methodology and business rules to strengthen the Integrated Threat Assessment process.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.6: Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
Description

This Sub-sub-program is a National Police Service supported by Treasury Board, which provides a secure online database of information on subjects, vehicles, boats and properties that may be linked to criminal justice and public safety activities. The database also stores other useful tactical information. Access to this information may be granted to specific users within the Canadian law enforcement community, other investigative bodies, and strategic partners worldwide. The first component consists of a central police database that provides information to public safety partners on crimes and criminals. The second component consists of the Police Information Portal (PIP), which is an integrated master indexing and records management gateway, allowing police agencies to access certain information published by police partner agencies. Agencies can quickly and efficiently access information on specific occurrences. The third component consists of the Public Safety Portal (PSP), a web based query tool that allows public safety partners to access limited police occurrences in accordance with their respective legislated mandate and legal authority. This Sub-sub-program is necessary because it is the only national fully-integrated and secure law enforcement and public safety communication tool.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
CPIC provides investigational data to law enforcement agencies and public safety partners Number of CPIC queries 24 million 26 million
Number of Police Information Portal (PIP) queries 12.5 million 15.8 million
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, the number of queries to CPIC and PIP exceeded set targets, demonstrating the continued usefulness of these systems in sharing critical law enforcement information. The CPI Centre Footnote 52 also continued to make great strides in stewarding information-sharing tools, working to ensure that these tools remained relevant in today's law enforcement environment. In the next few years, the CPIC system will be enhanced to allow contributors to upload pictures. In 2014–15, the CPI Centre prioritized this initiative and began the process of studying requirements and producing a technical analysis to determine the feasibility of implementation.

Furthermore, the CPI Centre developed a five-step continuous monitoring process for the review of all CPIC records. The new risk-based quality assurance review process replaces formal CPIC audits and focuses on data integrity. Preliminary testing through a three-phased proof of concept exercise was initiated in January 2014, which enabled the CPI Centre to fine tune its tools and processes. Anonymous data from various agencies was used in the first phase; three partner agencies participated actively in the second and third phases. A pilot project was subsequently launched in winter 2015 to validate all steps of the quality review process using data from six partner agencies. Once fully implemented, at a date yet to be determined, the automated process will review and validate all records from the 2,300 CPIC data entry and access points to ensure that information remains timely, accurate, and secure.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.7: Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC)
Description

This Sub-sub-program is comprised of three national programs: the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC), International Operations, and the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR). The Centre leverages relationships with government and policing partners to respond to threats of child sexual exploitation and, ultimately, reducing the vulnerability of children to the threat of Internet-facilitated sexual exploitation through identifying victims, investigating and assisting in the prosecution of sexual offenders, and strengthening the capacity of partners to respond to threats. The newly established NCMPUR will provide specialized support to law enforcement, medical examiners and chief coroners regarding missing persons and unidentified remains investigations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Assistance and investigational support is provided to local, municipal, regional, national and international policing partners Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the assistance or investigational support provided by CPCMEC 80% 67%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC) continued to experience a steady increase in requests for service, a trend which has had a serious resourcing impact on the Sub-sub-program. In 2014–15, the NCECC received approximately 8,500 requests, complaints and/or reports for assistance, representing a 40% increase since 2011. Of the requests received, 45% were from Canadians (either through Cybertip.ca or from other law enforcement agencies), with the remaining 55% from international sources. The number of investigational packages increased by 40% over the past two years, with 1,372 packages sent during the reporting year to police agencies of jurisdiction in cases of online child sexual exploitation. The Sub-sub-program has modified and improved its technological systems, and is transitioning to Hubstream to streamline and automate the triage process required for the dissemination of investigational packages. The CPCMEC and several international policing agencies from the UK, Australia, and the US are contributing to this project.

Advancements were also made in the testing of the Child Protection System (CPS), a web application used by law enforcement to investigate internet child exploitation. The CPS allows data de-confliction by trained users when searching usernames, hash values, phone numbers, and other data. The system provides a rich history of IP addresses that have been indexed as sharing files related to child abuse. In 2014–15, an assessment of the data and database features was underway, with additional testing to be conducted.

The Sub-sub-program contributed heavily to Project Snapshot III, which targeted child sex offenders who collect, possess, share, make available, distribute, and produce child sexual exploitation material. The investigation, which was coordinated by the NCECC, involved over 40 Canadian law enforcement agencies. More than 150 individuals were arrested, which resulted in 355 charges laid ranging from sexual assault, luring, arrangement for sexual offence against a child, possession/distribution, and voyeurism. More than 10 children were removed from harm, and over a million images and videos of child pornography were seized. Project Snapshot III followed two previous successful operations, the first of which targeted individuals in the Prairie and Northern regions of Canada, and the second of which focused on individuals in Atlantic Canada.

Lastly, the NCMPUR received 112 requests for assistance from domestic and international police agencies, as well as federal and provincial government agencies, on files ranging from abductions to reported missing persons. Of those 112 files, 61 were concluded within the fiscal year, and the remaining 51 are still being addressed. In support of operations, the NCMPUR launched three new level-1 investigator online courses; since course development began, over 1,400 participants have enrolled in the five courses and training initiatives offered through the Canadian Police Knowledge Network. The NCMPUR developed a national public website, Canada's Missing, to profile missing children, missing persons, and unidentified remains. Footnote 53 Since January 2015, 990 occurrences have been published to the public website, which includes 1,052 profiles of missing persons. Each profile on the website provides various avenues of contact for the public to submit tips to primary investigative agencies. During the reporting period, 82 tips were submitted to the NCMPUR, representing an increase of 40% compared to 2013–14.

Sub-program 1.2.2: Canadian Firearms Program
Description

This Sub-program enhances public safety by providing police and other law enforcement organizations with operational and technical support vital to the prevention and investigation of firearms crime both in Canada and internationally. Its goal is to reduce firearms-related death and injury in Canadian communities by regulating and promoting responsible ownership, use and storage of all firearms in Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Direct support is provided to law enforcement for firearms investigations Number of requests for service from law enforcement responded to by the Canadian Firearms Program 3,000 10,152
Firearms ownership information is available to front-line police Number of online queries to the Canadian Firearms Program database by frontline police 7,000,000 6,159,525
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) administered the Firearms Act and associated regulations, providing support and training to police and the criminal justice system with the enforcement of Part III of the Criminal Code. The CFP managed the licensing of firearm users by screening individuals and business applicants to confirm their eligibility to possess, use, transport, and safely store firearms. To this end, the Sub-program collaborated with firearm owners and users, safety instructors, firearms businesses, law enforcement organizations, provinces and territories, other federal agencies, and Aboriginal peoples.

The Sub-program is also responsible for National Weapons Enforcement Support Teams (NWEST), which are mandated to provide operational support and training to law enforcement for firearms investigations. NWEST personnel assisted law enforcement agencies by participating in firearms investigations and prosecutions, identifying potential public safety risks related to firearms issues, helping with the preparation or execution of search warrants, and providing firearms tracing and identification services. In 2014–15, the Sub-program responded to 10,152 requests for service, a marked increase over past years. This result was partly due to the more stringent reporting requirements that were introduced in 2013–14. NWEST will continue to gather more information about the type of assistance provided to better target its resources to the key services requested by clients.

In addition, law enforcement demonstrated continued use of the CFP database. Queries were well above six million throughout the year, or approximately 16,000 per day, a figure that has remained consistent for the past four fiscal years.

Finally, client service portals were enhanced with the introduction of an online firearms licence renewal for individuals. The Sub-program continued to review its operations in an effort to provide more efficient service delivery without comprising standards or the quality assurance of licensing and registration information.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.2.1: Firearms Licensing and Registration
Description

This Sub-sub-program has a legislative mandate to administer the Firearms Act, related Regulations, and provisions of the Criminal Code of Canada. It enhances public safety by periodically screening all firearm licence applicants and maintaining a database of 1.9 million licensed individuals and businesses. This reduces the risk that firearms are in the possession of persons that may pose a risk to public safety. This Sub-sub-program works collaboratively with law enforcement organizations, provincial Chief Firearms Officers (CFOs), and other public agencies. It governs the safe use and storage of firearms, and maintains records of restricted and prohibited firearms. This Sub-sub-program also designs and is responsible for the delivery of Canadian Firearms Safety courses, and advises the Commissioner of Firearms and the Minister with respect to the Firearms Act and Regulations. This Sub-sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Firearms Act.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Continuous eligibility screening of firearms clients promotes responsible firearms ownership Percentage of individuals with firearms whose licensing privileges have been revoked for public safety reasons reported to police by the Canadian Firearms Program for follow-up 100% 100%
Percentage of Firearms Interest Police matches between the Canadian Police Information Centre Incident Reports and individual firearms licence holders in the Canadian Firearms Information System that are being investigated or have been excluded by the Canadian Firearms Program as part of continuous eligibility screening of firearm owners 95% 96%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CFP staff working with Chief Firearms Officers, at the Central Processing Site (CPS) and client contact centre in Miramichi, NB, as well as the Canadian Firearms Registry in Ottawa, continued to interact with firearms clients and law enforcement to assist them with compliance with regulatory responsibilities as laid out in the Firearms Act. As a result of an organizational and operational review, several business activities that were previously performed by federally-appointed CFOs in their regions were centralized at the CPS. This has resulted in process efficiencies due to economies of scale, as well as enhancements to client service that the CFP will monitor against its service standards. Footnote 54

When a licence holder is reported via the Canadian Police Information Centre for an event involving violence (or other offences specified in Section 5 of the Firearms Act), a Firearms Interest Police (FIP) report is sent to CFOs for review. In federally-administered jurisdictions in 2014–15, the CFP completed investigations of 96% of FIP reports within 44 calendar days, meeting and exceeding the internal service standard. The Sub-sub-program notified the police of jurisdiction when a client with registered firearms had their licence revoked, either by the CFO as a result of an eligibility investigation or by a court-order. Follow-up on the disposition of the firearms was conducted, when required, by the police of jurisdiction.

Additionally, the CFP completed the last of the requirements of the Ending the Long-gun Registry Act. Pursuant to the SCC ruling dated March 27, 2015, all non-restricted firearm registration records for residents of Quebec were deleted.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.2.2: Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides specialized firearms services to frontline law enforcement agencies in the investigation and prosecution of persons or organizations involved in the illegal movement and criminal use of firearms. This is done by gathering evidence, tracing firearms, analyzing trends and maintaining the Firearms Reference Table. The RCMP provides training and advice to firearms prosecutors through its Crown Attorney program, works closely with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL). It is also directly involved in providing assistance to international groups, such as the United Nations (UN), Group of Eight (G8), and the Organization of American States (OAS), on operational issues related to illicit firearms.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Law enforcement partners will use Canadian Firearms Program services in fighting firearms-related crimes Number of firearm tracing requests received by the Canadian Firearms Program 2,000 1,936
Number of calls received by the Canadian Firearms Program via the police support line 3,000 2,358
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services continued to provide support to law enforcement agencies, government partners, international requestors, and businesses on a variety of requests. Footnote 55 In 2014–15, the Sub-sub-program responded to 1,936 requests for firearms tracing. While slightly below target, this was still within the three-year average for the CFP. Tracing requests were prioritized as received, with resources primarily dedicated to support investigations related to violent crimes and trafficking. The CFP answered 2,358 calls for police support through its 1-800 line, representing a decline following two years of stable call volume. However, this figure is in addition to the 10,152 calls for service answered by NWEST, which continued to experience significant growth over the past few reporting cycles.

In addition to specialized investigative support, the Sub-sub-program provided more than 50 training sessions on enforcement topics. Approximately 1,900 participants attended these sessions throughout the year, including representatives from policing, justice, and security organizations. The CFP also hosted an International Firearms Trafficking School in September 2014, which brought together 38 presenters and 185 participants representing 26 agencies from nine countries around the world.

Sub-program 1.2.3: Advanced Police Training
Description

This Sub-program provides training to the broader policing community including municipal, regional and provincial police services. This Sub-program is necessary as it increases the knowledge base and contributes to the increased efficiency of Canadian law enforcement agencies and government departments. Academic courses are provided on topics related to law enforcement as well as leadership and development curriculum for various levels of management.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Law enforcement capacity in Canada is supported by advanced training Percentage of clients who responded that they are satisfied with course performance, value for money, value to police learning, and post-course satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% N/A Footnote 56
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Sub-program has continued to use simulation training and updated technologies to support specialized training for the law enforcement community. At the RCMP's training academy, located in Regina, SK, initial basic and expanded training was provided to cadets and police personnel alike. Training modules were updated to include new material on missing persons and post-critical incident stress, in addition to enhanced material provided on the subject of mental health.

In keeping with the demand for advanced education and other leading edge programming, the Canadian Police College (CPC) is investing in a synthetic simulator system to reduce service delivery costs while providing practical exercises to students. A new Learning Management System is being implemented to advance programming for investigational support and specialized education. Taken together, these initiatives optimize training and offer the best learning possibilities in an efficient setting.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.3.1: Canadian Police College
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides training to the Canadian law enforcement community through various venues, including the two campuses of the Canadian Police College (Ottawa, ON and Chilliwack, BC) and onsite at other agencies, both national and international. This Sub-subprogram is necessary as some of this training is provided as a result of the 1966 Federal-Provincial Conference on Organized Crime, under the auspices of National Police Services (a suite of services to the broader policing community, including municipal and provincial police services, federal departments such as CBSA and Citizenship and Immigration Canada, as well as foreign police organizations including Interpol and the Federal Bureau of Investigation). Courses offered include advanced and specialized police sciences (e.g. forensic identification, technological crime, explosives) and leadership training.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Advanced and specialized training is available to the law enforcement community Percentage of Canadian Police College clients who responded that they are satisfied with the value for money, value to police learning, and post-course satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% 88%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the CPC delivered advanced and specialized education to approximately 3,000 law enforcement personnel, offering courses in the disciplines of explosives, forensics, technological crimes, investigative training, leadership, and professional development for Aboriginal members. During the reporting period, the Sub-sub-program focused its efforts on increasing client satisfaction while providing cost effective educational opportunities. This was pursued through course modernization, the establishment of new partnerships, and an update to the cost-recovery model.

Firstly, the CPC initiated the design and development of a new learning management system (LMS) to support a customized online learning environment. This new system supports integrated learning and enhanced collaboration across the Canadian law enforcement community, while maximizing access and flexibility to students and minimizing time away from work. The Executive Development in Policing program has been evaluating the existing blended course offerings with the new LMS to have it ready for use by learners in the fall of 2015.

Secondly, the CPC promoted partnerships and the sharing of best-practices, welcoming a student body that was 50 to 60% from external agencies (including municipal and provincial police services, other government departments, and international participants). The College continued its work with the law enforcement community to review projected educational needs and adjusted its curriculum accordingly. Lastly, the Sub-sub-program completed an activity-based costing of its fee structure, determining that costs to deliver courses exceeded existing tuition rates. Following consultation with NPS NAC and other law enforcement groups, the CPC began the first phase of a three-year initiative to base tuition fees on actual costs.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.3.2: National Law Enforcement Training
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides training to provincial and federal ministries and law enforcement agencies to assist in the fight against national and criminal activity. This Sub-sub-program also helps develop partnerships across agencies to further learning and the sharing of best practices. Subsub- program costs cover course preparation, delivery and associated travel costs, and are shared between the RCMP and the requesting domestic agency.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Operational training is provided to law enforcement Percent of NLET clients who responded that they are satisfied with course performance, value for money, value to police learning, and postcourse satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% N/A Footnote 57
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

National Law Enforcement Training (NLET) delivered recertification training to more than 1,200 RCMP members from Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, on topics ranging from police operational skills maintenance to firearms, emergency medical response, and health and wellness. During the reporting period, the Sub-sub-program provided scenario-based training to elicit and assess the ability of operational officers to employ newly-learned skills in a simulated environment. Instructional methodologies and course content for tactical training were modified, as the incorporation of a new tactical training facility created a more realistic practice environment.

NLET also continued to offer tailored training for federal, provincial, and municipal government clients. Under these agreements, the Sub-sub-program provided facilities, coordination, and liaison to facilitate training of new officers with the Correctional Service of Canada. Additionally, direct training was delivered to the Canadian Coast Guard, Parks Canada, and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). For the latter group, additional review and modification to course training standards were undertaken to meet the needs of DFO enforcement officers. During the reporting period, the Sub-sub-program undertook a review of course training standards to align with changing realities and the modernization of investigational methodology. With emphasis on the efficiency of resource deployment, more client demands for training were met, and the Sub-subprogram welcomed 406 external law enforcement/government clients.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides effective support of international operations"

Partners: 80%

Stakeholders: 80%

N/A Footnote 58
Number of partnerships and Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that promote the culture and heritage of the RCMP 5 3 Footnote 59

Program 2.1: International Policing Operations

Description

This Program furthers Canada's global peace and security agenda through cooperation with and support of the international law enforcement community, thereby ensuring that both Canadians and the global community are safer. This Program addresses the transnational scope of crime and terrorism by building relationships with international policing partners and by participating in the INTERPOL global information sharing network. Additionally, the RCMP actively participates in multiple missions abroad in a peacekeeping role and by providing support to nations at risk in building their law enforcement capacity. Through this international cooperation and collaboration, this Program contributes directly to a more secure world and Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
54,882,026 55,629,026 57,547,836 52,898,053 (2,730,973)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs]) Footnote 60
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
185 195 (10)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
International policing partners are engaged to achieve the RCMP's law enforcement and security objectives Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP engages international policing partners to achieve its law enforcement and security objectives" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 61
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Over the past few reporting cycles, the RCMP's International Policing Operations adopted a more strategic approach to align with Canada's domestic law enforcement and foreign policy priorities. Internal information sharing was improved and enhancements were made to focus on collaboration with other government departments, agencies, and international partners. As a result, the RCMP's internationally-deployed liaison officers, criminal intelligence analysts, capacity building personnel, and those managed under the International Police Peacekeeping program have been able to function in a more coherent manner, with a clearer understanding of and stronger alignment with the objectives of the Government of Canada.

To address transnational crime and counter-terrorism issues, the Program continued to deliver capacity building programming to enhance the skills and knowledge of foreign law enforcement organizations. Through DFATD's Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program (CTCBP) and the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP), the RCMP provided training, equipment, and technical expertise to a number of countries including Antigua, Guyana, Indonesia, Kenya, Malaysia, Morocco, Nigeria, Panama, Peru, Senegal, and Tanzania.

To further address the transnational scope of crime, the RCMP advanced its utilization of Europol for domestic and global advantage. International Policing deployed an RCMP employee to Europol Headquarters in The Hague to work on a cyber-crime related initiative and dedicated one of its liaison officer positions to build relationships and exchange information at Europol Headquarters. In addition, the RCMP's National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre has participated in a cooperation agreement with Europol, resulting in increased information sharing related to this important area of criminality.

Sub-program 2.1.1: International Stability and Development
Description

This Sub-program promotes global stability and peace by providing support for peace operations and capacity building work in high-risk communities in the developing world and elsewhere that are in need of international assistance. This includes delivering training sessions, sharing expertise and best practices, and providing resources for peace support operations. Additionally, by supporting these countries, the Sub-program contributes to global stability and peace thus benefitting Canadians.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Nations at risk are supported Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP effectively assesses and provides support/deployments to nations at risk" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 62
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In addition to enhancing the skills and knowledge of foreign law enforcement organizations, RCMP international capacity building assistance projects supported Canadian law enforcement operations as well as the Government of Canada's strategic priorities. In 2014–15, capacity building initiatives were implemented in developing states in Asia, Africa, and South and Central America. To maximize the value of programming, countries were selected following an assessment of the potential impact, effectiveness, and sustainability of programming.

Several deployments to international organizations also aided efforts to combat transnational organized crime. During the reporting period, one RCMP officer was deployed to the United Nations' (UN) Standing Police Capacity in Brindisi, Italy, and another member was deployed to the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations in New York City. To promote stability and police development in the West Bank, two advisors were assigned to the European Union Coordinating Office for Palestinian Police Support. Canadian police officers contributed to mission priorities and goals to establish sustainable and effective law and order, while also addressing issues of counter terrorism and overall security enhancements. In working with the Palestinian Civil Police, members assisted with the development of traffic programs, increased public order training, and improved incident command systems. Moreover, a senior police advisor was deployed to the Canadian Armed Forces' Operation Proteus in the West Bank in an effort to emphasize capacity-building in Jerusalem.

Lastly, in January 2015, three investigators from the RCMP and other Canadian law enforcement agencies were deployed to assist the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) to investigate crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide allegedly committed between 1975 and 1979 during the Khmer Rouge regime. The scope of investigations was expanded to incorporate sexual and gender-based crimes, including forced marriage. The police officers' investigative experience and training in major crime, as well as in sexual and gender-based violence, have made them a valuable asset to the ECCC.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.1.1: International Peace Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program manages the deployment of Canadian police personnel to international peace operations and international criminal courts and commissions to respond to or prevent international conflicts and crises, as well as to support the rule of law. The deployments are determined based on the Canadian Police Arrangement (CPA), a governance framework that exists between the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), DFATD, Public Safety Canada, and the RCMP.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian police officers are deployed abroad for peace support operations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides effective support to international peace operations" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 63
Percentage of Canadian police officers deployed in International Peace Operations missions based on the affordability model Minimum of 90% 54% Footnote 64
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through the Canadian Police Arrangement, approximately 85 Canadian police officers were deployed to the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH). These officers were sent to enhance the capacity and skills of the Haitian National Police (HNP) and to progressively increase HNP responsibility for security in their country. In the fall of 2014, the RCMP received approval from the UN to develop three Canadian-led specialized teams within MINUSTAH: a community policing team, a management advisory team, and a serious crime support unit. While still under development, these teams have begun work to address identified gaps in the capacity of the HNP. The community policing team has provided the HNP with community policing techniques to build relationships and trust with local residents; community involvement in the identification and resolution of security issues was identified as a priority in the HNP development plan as a means to reduce criminality and violence. Furthermore, Canadian representatives worked with Norwegian officers to set up specialized police cells on sexual and gender based violence, instructing the HNP to investigate such crimes through a train the trainer program.

To assist the UN with its goal of increasing female participation in UN missions, Canadian police and their UN counterparts travelled to Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon and Rwanda to oversee skills training covering topics related to communications, firearms, and driving. This project proved to be a success, contributing to a 95% increase in pass rates for women deploying to unarmed UN mission and a 51% increase in pass rates for women deploying to armed UN missions.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.1.2: International Policing Assistance and Capacity Building
Description

This Sub-sub-program contributes to global stability by developing and promoting tools, as well as providing training, advice, mentoring and subject matter expertise to developing countries and others, to help strengthen their law enforcement institutions over the long term.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
International law enforcement capacity is supported Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides effective support to law enforcement capacity abroad" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 65
Percentage of capacity building requests actioned which are fully funded and recognized as Government of Canada priorities Minimum of 90% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the Sub-sub-program developed an assessment and prioritization process to align its capacity building initiatives with RCMP and Government of Canada interests and priorities. This standardized process was based on consultations within Federal Policing and with other partners, providing an opportunity to assess and prioritize proposed countries and programming to ensure the international assistance provided would meet significant law enforcement needs. Under the revamped process, the RCMP funded a synthetic drug investigation techniques course for Chinese officials and provided the Jetway program to Trinidad and Tobago. Jetway was designed to assist foreign law enforcement agencies in the development of the knowledge, skills, and investigative techniques deemed essential to the successful investigation and prosecution of drug-related offences.

Through DFATD's two capacity building programs, the CTCBP and the ACCBP, the RCMP provided training, equipment, and technical expertise to partner countries, enabling them to prevent and respond to terrorist activities and transnational crime. In Kenya and Tanzania, intelligence analysis training was provided, while interviewing techniques were offered to Moroccan and Nigerian representatives. In Indonesia, the RCMP provided training on surveillance and counter-terrorism investigation management. Under the ACCBP's Human Smuggling program, the RCMP delivered shipboarding training in Indonesia and Malaysia, as well as interview techniques in Senegal. Furthermore, the ACCBP funded a needs assessment mission in the Dominican Republic to identify requirements to combat criminality. Lastly, DFATD's Global Partnership Program funded initiatives related to CBRNE event training in various countries in the Americas and Asia.

Sub-program 2.1.2: International Cooperation
Description

This Sub-program advances Canadian law enforcement interests and values abroad, and promotes partnerships within the international law enforcement community. This Sub-program sustains multilateral relationships to bolster the effectiveness of policing operations both domestically and globally. Examples include: the RCMP Liaison Officer program, which deploys members to strategic foreign locations in support of the RCMP's mandate; INTERPOL Ottawa; and International Peace Operations, which deploys Canadian police personnel to failed and fragile states in support of capacity building efforts. This Sub-program also supports the development of RCMP engagement strategies to identify best practices, challenges, and opportunities with the goal of improving cooperation with key partners.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian law enforcement interests and values abroad are advanced Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides effective international support to the Canadian law enforcement community" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 66
Partnerships within the international law enforcement community are promoted Number of new MOUs or Letters of Intent (LOIs) that are signed between the RCMP and international law enforcement organizations to assist Canadian law enforcement partners 1 1 Footnote 67
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the RCMP implemented its new "One" international strategy to create a singular program focused on enhancing the RCMP's global visibility, reach, and influence. As part of this engagement strategy, the RCMP sustained and advanced bilateral and multilateral relationships while pushing forward with its operational outlook.

Through its management of INTERPOL Ottawa, the Sub-program continued to support international policing partnerships and information sharing. The RCMP enhanced international cooperation by seconding a senior officer to INTERPOL to develop and implement a War Crimes and Genocide sub-directorate. This new coordination body was developed at the request of member countries, tasking the RCMP officer with developing and implementing a strategic plan to increase service delivery. Through such efforts, the RCMP worked closely with international tribunals to close the impunity gap for these serious international crimes.

Similarly, a senior officer was seconded to INTERPOL to lead its Capacity Building and Training Directorate, an initiative which greatly enhanced international cooperation and increased service delivery to INTERPOL's 190 member countries. With support from DFATD, $30 million of funding was secured for INTERPOL projects, which was distributed according to recommendations and needs analyses conducted by member countries. In leading important initiatives such as these, the RCMP enhanced its partnerships with the international policing community, while creating a level of trust that recognized the RCMP and the Canadian government as key players in international law enforcement.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.1: Operations Support Abroad
Description

Through the liaison officer network, this Sub-sub-program provides operational support and assistance to Canadian law enforcement agencies in the detection, prevention and investigation of offences to Canadian federal laws. Additionally, it liaises with foreign police agencies, and related institutions to exchange criminal information in order to identify trends and threats to the safety of Canadian homes and communities.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Operational support and assistance to Canadian law enforcement agencies is facilitated Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP provides timely response to international requests" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 68
Liaison Officers are deployed to assist law enforcement partners Number of new temporary deployment(s) or permanent redeployment(s) to respond to operational priorities 1 8
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the RCMP continued to post liaison officers to strategic locations around the world, both to support the Canadian law enforcement community and to serve as a vital link with international partners. The International Liaison and Coordination Centre assessed and adjusted the positioning of liaison officers within the Americas, which allowed for the establishment of permanent posts in Ankara, Turkey; Panama City, Panama; Nairobi, Kenya; and Canberra, Australia. Such assessments were designed to increase the visibility, reach, and influence of the RCMP in strategic and operational areas. Moreover, the establishment of temporary and permanent posts allowed the RCMP to successfully disrupt transnational human smuggling and organized crime groups, and enabled a more nimble response to regions with emerging and current threats to Canada's national security.

During the reporting period, eight temporary liaison officers were deployed under Project Seahorse, a collaborative effort with foreign authorities to stop illegal migration, transnational human smuggling and trafficking. In 2014–15, no known vessels of interest containing potential irregular immigrants destined for Canada were found to have departed from regions in Asia and Africa. By employing a more responsive and mission-centric approach, the RCMP was better positioned to provide effective support to Canadian and international law enforcement partners.

Sub-sub-program: 2.1.2.2 International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)
Description

This Sub-sub-program shares information and seeks assistance in criminal investigations between Canada a nd INTERPOL's member countries in their respective jurisdictions. INTERPOL Ottawa, located at RCMP National Headquarters, is necessary as it serves as the principal link between Canadian and international law enforcement communities by coordinating international requests for assistance with the appropriate Canada law enforcement agencies. It also provides a unique range of essential services, such as access to criminal databases (criminal records, passports, etc.) and advancing investigative INTERPOL tools to locate fugitives, missing persons as well as coordinating the possible deportation or extradition of international or Canadian fugitives while optimizing the effort to prevent and combat transnational crime.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian involvement in international law enforcement actions is coordinated Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is one of their first considerations when seeking international assistance" 80% N/A Footnote 69
Criminal information is shared amongst INTERPOL's member countries Number of queries and hits to the INTERPOL/CPIC interface

Queries: 200,000

Hits: 750

Queries: 1,378,001

Hits: 752

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During the reporting period, INTERPOL Ottawa continued to coordinate Canadian involvement in international law enforcement action. In 2014–15, the RCMP noticed a significant increase in queries to the INTERPOL/CPIC database, an interface that enables frontline Canadian police officers and other accredited Canadian law enforcement agencies to query INTERPOL databases. This leap is largely attributed to increased usage by CBSA.

Due to the strategic location of Central America and the Caribbean, criminal organizations in these countries are involved in several forms of illicit trafficking, particularly in drugs and firearms. Such activities destabilize security in the region, principally in the areas of governance and peace. Building on previous experience from INTERPOL's Operation Lionfish I, carried out in 2013, INTERPOL conducted Operational Lionfish II in the region, supporting member countries in fighting international organized crime. The RCMP deployed a representative to the INTERPOL Regional Bureau in El Salvador to support real-time information exchange and to facilitate the cross-checking of data against INTERPOL and Canadian databases. With extensive preparation, coordination, and resources provided by 39 countries and territories across the Americas, Caribbean, and Europe, the two-week operation resulted in the arrest of 422 suspects and the seizure of 27.5 tonnes of drugs (estimated street value of $1.3 billion USD), 7.6 tonnes of chemical precursors, 100 weapons, and $2.2 million USD in cash.

In March 2015, INTERPOL Ottawa also provided support to Operation Sunbird, which focussed on identifying wanted criminals across Southeast Asia. The Sub-sub-program deployed a subject matter expert to assist with the operation, which involved the coordination of passport screenings across nine Southeast Asian countries at land, air, and sea border entry points. More than 500,000 searches were conducted by participating countries, resulting in 16 'hits' on passports in INTERPOL's Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database and the identification of two individuals who were subjects of INTERPOL Red Notices for wanted persons. Based on information exchanged during the operation, two additional persons were located in the Philippines and a third was arrested in Europe.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.3: International Law Enforcement Training
Description

Working diligently with RCMP policy centers, Government of Canada agencies and international partners, this Sub-subprogram reduces international organized crime by providing strategic training, thus bridging international operational gaps and strengthening local law enforcement. By providing these necessary tools to suppress criminal activity, the RCMP is consequently strengthening global security and making communities safer. Funding for this Sub-subprogram goes towards training equipment, travel expenses and training aids necessary to complete the required services. Costs are shared between the RCMP and DFATD through various memoranda of understanding.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Training is provided to international law enforcement agencies and departments Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective support to international operations" 90% N/A Footnote 70
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the Sub-sub-program dedicated resources to provide expertise and training for several initiatives around the world. Training programs were provided to combat a variety of major crimes, including terrorism, financial crime, money laundering, human smuggling, as well as synthetic drug production and trafficking. Courses were also offered for key investigative techniques, such as interviewing, surveillance, and tactical intelligence analysis. These programs enhanced the knowledge and skills of recipient police authorities in countries including Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Guyana, Ecuador, Indonesia, Jamaica, Malaysia, Nigeria, and Tanzania. Following delivery of a surveillance techniques course, the Guyana National Police reported that they were able to conduct surveillance and successfully intercept a narcotics importer, providing further evidence of operational successes that can be garnered from international law enforcement training.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.4: International Visits and Protocol
Description

This Sub-sub-program is responsible for the approval, coordination, and post-travel evaluation of RCMP employee attendance at international conferences, seminars and workshops. It is also responsible for providing assistance in obtaining special passports and visas for official Government of Canada travel by RCMP employees. Additionally, it coordinates official visits by international law enforcement to the RCMP, and provides guidance to employees hosting international visitors and delegations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
International travel of RCMP employees is facilitated and managed Percentage of travelers complying with policy requirements regarding traveler safety Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 71
Percentage of international administrative travel requests that are assessed and approved according to International Travel and Visitors Branch policy 95% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

International Travel continued to play a critical role in supporting the liaison officer network, and more generally the RCMP's ability to build and maintain relationships with foreign law enforcement partners. In 2014–15, the majority of administrative travel was related to training and conferences within North America, namely in the United States. As for International Visits and Protocol, the Sub-sub-program planned, coordinated, and implemented 24 official visits involving 13 countries, which included China, Italy, Lithuania, and Turkey. In addition, the unit supported the organization of three conferences related to Canada-Israel Law Enforcement Cooperation, the Canada-China Law Enforcement Working Group, as well as a workshop pertaining to CBRNE for international participants. Outreach endeavours such as these allowed the RCMP to exchange best practices and review operational interests and threats with foreign partners and stakeholders.

Program 2.2: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

Description

In order to protect the RCMP's internationally recognized image, reputation and rich heritage, this Program works to promote the positive image of the RCMP while building relationships with domestic and international law enforcement, government and community partners. The Program provides advice and analysis to internal and external clients — including federal, provincial and municipal partners, academic institutions, Royal Household representatives, and nongovernment organizations — regarding appropriate ceremonial features of special events and occurrences (e.g., the Olympics, Expos, Summits and at funerals for police officers). Through the activities of this Program, the RCMP contributes to Canada's vibrant culture and heritage.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10,842,331 11,091,331 12,533,858 13,571,003 2,479,672
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
99 88 (11)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada" 80% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program is responsible for the promotion and protection of the RCMP and its rich heritage. As an important symbol of Canada, the Program coordinated the ceremonial presence of members in red serge at events throughout Canada and the world. In 2014–15, ceremonial resources were dedicated to the visits of the presidents of France, Germany, and South Korea. Members from the Haitian Police, USCG, and delegations from Taiwan, Algeria and Peru met and visited with members of the Program, thereby promoting positive relations with Canada.

The mandate of the RCMP is important to convey when engaging with stakeholders and developing partnerships.

A newly established outreach program aimed to enhance knowledge of the past and present work of the RCMP. During the reporting period, 13 events and 23 projects were developed with government partners such as Canadian Heritage, Canada Post and the Royal Canadian Mint, as well as organizations such as Heritage Toronto. The RCMP was proud to participate in the Government of Canada's National Day of Honour on May 9, 2014 for the Afghan mission, providing a ceremonial and operational presence. Moreover, in recognition of its longstanding support, the RCMP received the Canadian Blood Services Partner for Life Award. Taken together, these outreach endeavours have allowed the RCMP to further connect with the communities it serves.

Sub-program 2.2.1: Musical Ride
Description

This Sub-program promotes the heritage and traditions of both the RCMP and Canada to Canadians and the international community, and helps to raise money for local charities, by organizing and performing local shows of the Musical Ride. The Musical Ride's Canadian Tour travels to approximately 45 to 55 Canadian communities in two different provinces every year, over a period of 85 to 100 days. It will also perform at international venues upon request using a cost recovery model. Destinations for the Musical Ride's tour are chosen from among requests from communities, and the final schedule is drafted to align the tour with the priorities of divisional Commanding Officers, other government departments, or Members of Parliament. Typically, these priorities support public outreach programs or RCMP recruiting initiatives in contract policing communities. In addition to the tour, the Musical Ride also provides riders in red serge for ceremonial events and parades hosted by the RCMP or by other government partners. Typical events can include such things as memorial services or visits by foreign dignitaries. Costs for this Sub-program cover the equitation training of RCMP members, the breeding, training and supporting of horses required for the program, and all of the logistical tasks associated with the Musical Ride's tour and performances.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The Musical Ride supports Canadian communities Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "We were satisfied in hosting the Musical Ride" 100% N/A Footnote 73
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Musical Ride spent the 2014–15 fiscal year touring through Quebec and Alberta, offering 94 performances during a 122-day tour, including a special performance in Lac Megantic, Quebec. Throughout the tour, the Ride helped host organizations raise approximately $300,000 for local charitable endeavours.

To continue to build partnerships in Canada and abroad, the Musical Ride hosted law enforcement officers from the US, Lebanon and Israel for two Mounted Police Seminars. The cost-recovery program provided international law enforcement partners with basic equitation skills for ceremonial and police duties. The Ride also continued to support DND's "Soldier On Program," welcoming 12 individuals to partake in a therapeutic riding course for ill or injured Canadian Forces personnel.

Sub-program 2.2.2: Partnerships and Heritage
Description

This Sub-program promotes and protects the RCMP's image. It ensures the representation of the RCMP and Canada at major events by building and leveraging strategic partnerships with Other Government Departments (OGDs), and non-profit and private sector organizations; it regulates the use of the RCMP's image, trademarks and technology by the general public and industry by managing sponsorships and licensing agreements; it documents and preserves the RCMP's heritage and answers related enquires from the general public; and it coordinates the RCMP's participation in both public and departmental ceremonial or special events such as the Sunset Ceremonies, funerals, memorial services, or visits by members of the Royal Family. This Sub-program also manages the RCMP's representation in both domestic and international special events by reviewing and authorizing requests for members in Red Serge. Costs cover all administrative tasks and logistical support/resources to carry out these responsibilities, to cover the Sunset Ceremonies, and legal and administrative fees related to the management of intellectual property.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The image of the RCMP is promoted and protected as a symbol of Canada Number of licence agreements and MOUs for the authorized use of the RCMP image 104 18 Footnote 74
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, the Partnerships and Heritage Sub-program created a Ceremonial Request Section to govern and coordinate the participation of RCMP members at international and national ceremonial events. During the reporting period, the section fulfilled 61 requests, representing a 7% increase from the previous year. Requests were received from partners including DFATD, Environment Canada, the National Resource Council and several Consulates General. Support was also provided to Veterans Affairs Canada throughout Veterans Week, held in November, as well as events held to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Italian Campaign.

The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) continued to protect the RCMP's image and trademarks, working with internal and external stakeholders on questions regarding books, public events and youth initiatives. The IPO provided advice to the RCMP Foundation, a third-party registered charity that reinvests profits from the sale of licensed merchandise for initiatives that help at-risk youth.

The Sub-program is a key partner in supporting the Government of Canada's "Road to 2017" initiative, engaging partners on various projects to celebrate Canada's upcoming 150th anniversary. Some major milestones throughout the year include the 200th anniversary of the birth of Sir John A. Macdonald, the Prime Minister who created the North-West Mounted Police, as well as the Canada Day Challenge program in partnership with Canadian Heritage. Tied to these endeavours, the Historical Section completed several research projects on topics such as the RCMP's participation in the First World War, the No. 1 Provost Company in the Second World War, and the 50th anniversary of the Canadian flag. All 462 requests for historical information were answered within the reporting period, providing external and internal requestors with information on genealogical, policing, and heritage topics.

Strategic Outcome 3: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death

Performance Measurement
Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Percentage of payments processed according to contractual and policy authorities and the prescribed financial control framework 100% 100%

Program 3.1: Transfer Payments

Description

This Program ensures that RCMP employees and their families are provided income security in the event of disability or death. This Program ensures that an appropriate level of support is afforded to those who are affected by circumstances beyond their control and as a result of their employment with the RCMP. The activities within this Program are regulated by statutory payments, for example, the RCMP Pension Continuation Act payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
159,849,131 164,898,076 162,371,322 156,978,125 (7,919,951)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
N/A N/A N/A
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Claims and inquiries are answered within established service standards Percentage of claims and enquiries processed in accordance with established service standards 100% 71%
Sub-program 3.1.1: Members Injured on Duty - Compensation
Description

This Sub-program provides both financial and health care assistance to members of the RCMP who suffer a permanent work-related illness or injury that causes loss in quality of life. Because this support is available, members of the force are motivated to achieve excellent results in providing Canadians with a safe and secure Canada. This Subprogram uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grant to compensate members of the RCMP for injuries received in the performance of duty.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Compensation benefits are provided to RCMP members and their families Percentage of compensation benefits claims processed within established service standards 100% 71% Footnote 75
Sub-program 3.1.2: Survivor Income Plan
Description

This Sub-program was designed to meet the needs of the survivors of members who have sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. The Sub-program's goal is to compensate a family for the income lost with the death of the member such that their net income remains at the same level.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Income protection is provided for families of members who have suffered a duty-related death Percentage of benefits claims processed within established service standards 100% 100%
Sub-program 3.1.3: RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments
Description

This Sub-program administers pension payments for Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs) and Constables who enrolled in the RCMP Pension Continuation Act (PCA) program prior to March 1st, 1949 and did not opt into its successor pension program, the RCMP Superannuation Act. The PCA is a defined benefit program that provides a lifetime benefit for RCMP members and their survivors.

The program does not currently have any contributors and once payments conclude for current recipients, it is expected that the PCA will be abandoned. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Pensions under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act (PCA) (statutory).

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Pension benefits are provided for retired members of the RCMP and their survivors Percentage of pension benefits administered within established service standards 100% 100%

Program 4.1: Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, Acquisition Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided to a specific program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for Use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
627,857,641 647,196,641 744,654,107 720,649,549 73,452,908
Human Resources (FTEs) Footnote 76
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,850 5,184 334
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of the RCMP Communications Focus 2017, training continued to inform and educate management on their roles and responsibilities with respect to organizational communications. Communications content was embedded in the curriculum of national performance programs, and more than 20 targeted training sessions were held in the NCR and across RCMP divisions. A new mechanism, "One RCMP — One Voice", was implemented to disseminate a coherent flow of information across the organization. Key topics were provided on a monthly basis to management and discussed in-person with employees, a process that was designed to increase awareness and engagement.

The RCMP identified "Strong Ethics, Strong Organization" as its strategic objective under the Professional Ethics Strategic Plan, with initiatives established under the strategic priorities of ethical leadership, governance, and culture. Divisions reported on activities and initiatives that were targeted to address gaps identified by various surveys. A new Regular Member Code of Conduct and a Public Service Employee Code of Conduct were developed, and a commendation award was created for ethics and integrity.

With the coming into force of the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act in November 2014, the Professional Responsibility Sector amended or substantially transformed all core personnel administrative procedures under its purview, which were intended to strengthen a comprehensive, responsibility-based workplace regime. Extensive communication products and training initiatives were developed to inform all employees of changes made to the RCMP's governing legislation.

Recruiting modernization was identified as a key priority in the Human Resources Sector Integrated Business Strategy, with three objectives: streamlining the process to shorten applicant processing; modernizing recruiting approaches to meet current and future workforce needs; and introducing business intelligence tools to determine trends, gaps and impacts for the recruiting program. Fundamental drivers to this modernization initiative included a national roll-out of electronic testing, a realignment of the candidate assessment process, and the development of a "suitability matrix" to improve the consistency of applicant ratings. The RCMP also established a multi-disciplinary team to coordinate applicants through the recruitment process, made changes to the RCMP Careers website for clarity and simplification, and prepared for the electronic intake of applications. These endeavours, along with a ramp up of recruitment, resulted in sending 960 cadets to the RCMP Training Academy, an increase from the 336 cadets sent in 2012–13.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2015
(dollars)
Financial Information 2014-15
Planned Results
2014-15
Actual
2013-14
Actual (restated)
Difference
(2014-15 Actual minus 2014-15 Planned)
Difference
(2014-15 Actual minus 2013-14 Actual)
Total Expenses 4,793,239,000 4,951,694,000 4,997,673,000 158,455,000 (45,979,000)
Total Revenues 1,821,597,000 1,850,260,000 1,834,752,000 28,663,000 15,508,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,971,642,000 3,101,434,000 3,162,921,000 129,792,000 (61,487,000)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2015
(dollars)
Financial Information 2014-15 2014-15 Difference
(2014-15 minus 2013-14)
Total net liabilities 14,149,945,000
14,192,695,000 (42,750,000)
Total net financial assets 13,984,416,000 14,125,151,000 (140,735,000)
Departmental net debt 165,529,000 67,544,000 97,985,000
Total non-financial assets 1,462,061,000 1,440,381,000 21,680,000
Departmental net financial position 1,296,532,000 1,372,837,000 (76,305,000)

Financial Highlights

The charts below illustrate the distribution of each of the items in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position.

Expenses

The majority of the expenses (76.3%) are related to the costs of Police Operations, which contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Approximately 14% of the expenses are related to Internal Services, which supports the needs of programs and corporate obligations of the RCMP. Another 5.1% is related to activities that contribute to Canadian Law Enforcement Services while 3.2% is related to Transfer Payments. The other activities combined represent 1.4% of total expenses.

Distribution of Expenses
Police Operations Internal Services Canadian Law Enforcement Services International Policing Operations Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Transfer Payments
Percentage 76.3% 14.0% 5.1% 1.1% 0.3% 3.2%

Revenues

RCMP's Policing Services generates 100.0% of the respendable amount of revenues. Policing Services contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Distribution of Revenues
Policing Services Other Revenues
Percentage 100% 0.0%

Liabilities

The RCMP's liabilities consist mainly of RCMP Pension Accounts (93.7%), accounts payable and accrued liabilities (2.9%), and vacation pay and compensatory leave (1.8%).

Assets by Type
RCMP Pension accounts Accounts payable and accrued laibilities Vacation pay & compensatory leave Employee future benefits Net Deferred revenue Lease obligations for tangible capital assets Other liabilities
Percentage 93.7% 2.9% 1.8% 1.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1%

Assets

Approximately 86.4% of the RCMP's total assets are comprised of amounts due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, the vast majority of which represents funds available to discharge pension and severance-related liabilities.

The balance of assets is comprised of tangible capital assets (9.1%), net accounts receivable and advances (4.1%) and inventory (0.4%).

Assets by Type
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund Net accounts receivable and advances Tangible capital assets Inventory
Percentage 86.4% 4.1% 9.1% 0.4%

Financial Statements

Detailed financial statements, including the Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility and Internal Control over Financial Reporting, can be found on the RCMP's website. Footnote 77

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014-15 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the RCMP's website. Footnote 78

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More;
  • Horizontal Initiatives;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations;
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits;
  • Status Report on Projects Operating With Specific Treasury Board Approval; and
  • User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Footnote 79publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For inquiries about the RCMP Departmental Performance Report, please contact:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Strategic Policy and Planning Directorate
73 Leikin Drive
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0R2

RPP_DPR-RPP_RMR@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit):
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires):
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement):
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein):
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full personyear charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada):
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats):
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires):
Includes net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement):
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement):
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement):
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues):
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plan (plan):
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities (priorité):
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme):
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes):
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités):
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
result (résultat):
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives):
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique):
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé):
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible):
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées):
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental):
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.
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