Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

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ISSN 2368-0873

Table of Contents


The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Minister's Message

As Canada's Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am pleased to present to Parliament the RCMP Departmental Performance Report for the period ending March 31, 2014.

From providing law enforcement in many parts of Canada, to combating terrorism and organized crime, to performing the Musical Ride clad in the iconic red serge, the RCMP is always working to keep Canadians safe.

Over the last year there have been numerous successes, ranging from taking criminals off the street, disrupting threats to national security, and cracking down on the drug trade. Like any organization of this size, there may be difficulties from time to time. But members of the RCMP consistently meet these challenges head on, ready to take action to keep Canadians safe.

In closing, while it is not within the period covered by this report, I would be remiss if I did not take a moment to reflect on the loss of Constable Dave Ross, Constable Doug Larche and Constable Fabrice Gevaudan on a tragic June day in New Brunswick. We will not forget the selfless actions of these Canadian heroes.

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, Strategic Outcome, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year; and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013-14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments.

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.

Deputy head: Commissioner Bob Paulson

Ministerial portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling instruments:

Year of Commencement: 1873

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

As Canada's national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is a critical element of the Government of Canada's commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Responsibilities

The RCMP's mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

  • 1 Strategic Outcome: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
    • 1.1 Program: Police Operations
      • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Contract Policing
        • 1.1.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Provincial/Territorial Policing
        • 1.1.1.2 Sub-sub-program: Municipal Policing
        • 1.1.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Aboriginal Policing
        • 1.1.1.4 Sub-sub-program: Airport Protective Policing
      • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Federal Policing
        • 1.1.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Drugs and Organized Crime
        • 1.1.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Border Integrity
        • 1.1.2.3 Sub-sub-program: Financial Crime
        • 1.1.2.4 Sub-sub-program: Federal Crime Enforcement
        • 1.1.2.5 Sub-sub-program: National Security
        • 1.1.2.6 Sub-sub-program: Protective Policing
        • 1.1.2.7 Sub-sub-program: Protection Coordination Unit
      • 1.1.3 Sub-program: Technical Services and Operational Support
        • 1.1.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Technical Investigations
        • 1.1.3.2 Sub-sub-program: Protective Technologies
        • 1.1.3.3 Sub-sub-program: Flight Operations
        • 1.1.3.4 Sub-sub-program: Disclosure and Major Case Management
        • 1.1.3.5 Sub-sub-program: Scientific Services/Technologies
        • 1.1.3.6 Sub-sub-program: Operational Readiness and Response
        • 1.1.3.7 Sub-sub-program: Covert Operations
    • 1.2 Program: Canadian Law Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support
        • 1.2.1.1 Sub-sub-program: Integrated Forensic Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.2 Sub-sub-program: Forensic Laboratory Services
        • 1.2.1.3 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
        • 1.2.1.4 Sub-sub-program: National Services and Research Support (Forensic)
        • 1.2.1.5 Sub-sub-program: Criminal Intelligence
        • 1.2.1.6 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
        • 1.2.1.7 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC)
      • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Canadian Firearms Program
        • 1.2.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Licensing and Regulations
        • 1.2.2.2 Sub-sub-program: Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services
      • 1.2.3 Sub-program: Advanced Police Training
        • 1.2.3.1 Sub-sub-program: Canadian Police College
        • 1.2.3.2 Sub-sub-program: National Law Enforcement Training
  • 2 Strategic Outcome: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
    • 2.1 Program: International Policing Operations
      • 2.1.1 Sub-program: International Stability and Development
        • 2.1.1.1 Sub-sub-program: International Peace Operations
        • 2.1.1.2 Sub-sub-program: International Policing Assistance and Capacity Building
      • 2.1.2 Sub-program: International Cooperation
        • 2.1.2.1 Sub-sub-program: Operations Support Abroad
        • 2.1.2.2 Sub-sub-program: International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)
        • 2.1.2.3 Sub-sub-program: International Law Enforcement Training
        • 2.1.2.4 Sub-sub-program: International Visits and Protocol
    • 2.2 Program: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage
      • 2.2.1 Sub-program: Musical Ride
      • 2.2.2 Sub-program: Partnerships and Heritage
  • 3 Strategic Outcome: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death
    • 3.1 Program: Statutory Payments
      • 3.1.1 Sub-program: Members Injured on Duty - Compensation
      • 3.1.2 Sub-program: Survivor Income Plan
      • 3.1.3 Sub-program: RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments
  • 4 Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Serious and Organized Crime Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Summary of Progress
Through increased awareness, education and enforcement, the RCMP made significant contributions to the reduction of serious and organized crime throughout Canada. In this reporting period, the RCMP successfully disrupted organized crime groups that represented criminal threats at the national and provincial levels. Disruptions included the arrests of targets, the seizure or restraint of proceeds of crime and, in some cases, the total dismantlement of the organized crime group. For example, the RCMP worked with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of British Columbia to uncover four sophisticated marihuana grow operations. Ten thousand marihuana plants and expensive equipment were seized with approximate values of $5 million to $10 million.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
National Security Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Summary of Progress
Through the RCMP's law enforcement mandate, individuals and/or groups were disrupted from carrying out criminal activity that posed a threat to national security. Cooperation with a number of domestic and foreign law enforcement organizations, as well as security and intelligence agencies, allowed the RCMP to prevent, detect, deny and respond to threats to national security. On December 1, 2013, the RCMP made public the arrest of Qing Quentin Huang of Toronto for charges under the Security of Information Act. Mr. Huang was charged with two attempts to communicate to a foreign entity (China) sensitive Canadian government information relating to a national shipbuilding procurement strategy. Likewise, the RCMP's extensive outreach efforts contributed to the prevention of national security threats by working with a number of communities to counter violent extremism and radicalization to violence.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Economic Integrity Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Summary of Progress
The RCMP continued to make strides in the fight against economic crime, through the aggressive enforcement of laws related to money laundering, proceeds of crime, corruption, counterfeit currency, bankruptcy and capital market offences. Proactive educational initiatives and collaboration with law enforcement agencies and financial institutions further contributed to the stability of Canada's economic and political system. For instance, in cooperation with the Coalition of Retired Persons and the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC), the RCMP expanded awareness programs to help prevent more Canadians from being victimized. The RCMP launched a Fraud Prevention website and made available a fraud-busting handbook titled The Little Black Book of Scams. This initiative was paired with the ongoing posting of vital information relevant to seniors to enhance their awareness of scams related to identity theft, phishing or trolling online for personal information and phony websites. Economic integrity will continue to be a priority for the RCMP, as it is estimated that 90% of fraudsters are involved in organized crime. The CAFC receives 120,000 complaints about fraud every year.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Aboriginal Communities Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Summary of Progress
The RCMP continued to build and enhance relationships with Aboriginal communities to bolster their safety and overall health. For example, the RCMP launched a recruitment drive to provide communities with uniformed peace officers who have specialized knowledge of the communities they serve including their language, culture and geography. To identify risk factors and guide crime prevention strategies, the RCMP completed a review of outstanding cases of missing Aboriginal females and all Aboriginal female homicides occurring between 1980 and 2012. This review will be an asset as policing resources target crime prevention initiatives within Aboriginal communities most at risk of victimization.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome
Youth Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Summary of Progress
Throughout the year, the RCMP focused its efforts at building and enhancing successful partnerships with communities and youth themselves. In February 2014, the RCMP hosted its fourth National Youth Leadership Workshop, which brought together RCMP officers and youth from across Canada to identify crime and victimization issues and to develop community action plans that were youth-led and supported by police. To maximize internal knowledge and training, the RCMP also launched an online training course in partnership with the Department of Justice that addressed changes to the Youth Criminal Justice Act. Externally, the RCMP launched the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention website, an interactive site intended for youth, educators and parents. New to this site are features that allow users to ask experts questions on youth crime and victimization, as well as a dedicated space to discuss ongoing issues in their communities via social media. Lastly, the RCMP worked with "Taking it Global" and the Centre for Global Education to develop RCMPTalks, a series of interactive videoconferences focused on priority youth issues including bullying, cyberbullying and impaired and distracted driving. An estimated 600 students and 300 members of the public attended the learning events through live streaming, and a team of expert mentors provided feedback to student and public postings during the learning events.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Changing Threat Environment

Given the shift in operational realties such as changing demographics, crime typology and access to new technology coupled with ageing and compartmentalized data warehouses, the RCMP may be unable to make critical operational decisions that are based on timely and accurate information in an environment where situational awareness is essential.

(Linked to Management of Information Technology Risk)

The RCMP continued to focus its efforts on the re-engineering of Federal Policing, which included the prioritization of major federal-level projects and division-level crime reduction strategies, engagement of the federal policing community and the leveraging of key relationships with public partners.

RCMP Strategic Outcome:

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Sub-programs:

1.1.1 Contract Policing

1.1.2 Federal Policing

1.2.1 Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support

Management Practices

Given the size, complexity and diversity of roles employees fill within the organization, those placed in supervisory and management positions may be unable to access timely and consistent learning opportunities and policy support to adequately position them to meet organizational expectations and provide appropriate and timely guidance.

RCMP initiatives and activities were based on four guiding principles: stronger governance; efficient use of resources; increased accountability; and an emphasis on operations.

A key focus was legislative reform through the Enhancing RCMP Accountability Act. This legislation helped strengthen policies and processes that the RCMP had in place to ensure a safe, healthy and respectful workplace. The act has also allowed the organization to be more responsive to the needs and expectations of Canadians, stakeholders and RCMP employees.

RCMP Strategic Outcome:

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Sub-program:

4.1.2 Resource Management Services

Management of Information Technology

Revolutionary advancements in Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) are continuing to drive the way organizations function. Sustainability of aging IM/IT systems and overloaded and siloed data holdings pose significant risks to meeting administrative and operational requirements.

(Linked to Changing Threat Environment Risk)

The organization concentrated its efforts on a restructured IM/IT program, to be run as a national enterprise model. The RCMP also focused on the provision of modern tools and technologies, as well as access to immediate, reliable information.

RCMP Strategic Outcome:

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Programs:

1.1 Police Operations

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services

4.1 Internal Services

Sub-program:

4.1.2 Resource Management Services

Risk Narrative

The RCMP has experienced a significant amount of internal and external change over the past decade. Increased concerns about terrorism and extremism, changing demographics and rapid technological advancements have created a complex operating environment and represent key drivers for risks.

A significant corporate risk review was undertaken across the organization in 2013-14. As part of this exercise, the RCMP examined risk treatment strategies and environmental changes, which led to the re-examination of the most significant risks. Results of the risk assessment exercise landed on four overarching themes: Strategy and Governance; Technology and Infrastructure; External Environment; and Human Resources. Risk statements were also reframed during the exercise.

Over the past year, the Federal Policing Sub-program made significant changes to its administrative and operational functions. The new Federal Policing structure has allowed the organization to better align resources to enforcement priorities, thereby modernizing operations for the efficient and effective fulfilment of the federal enforcement mandate.

The Legislative Reform Initiative team has worked steadily to advance reforms mandated under the Enhancing RCMP Accountability Act. The RCMP continued to advance its ongoing transformation, significantly strengthening policies and processes already in place that support a safe, healthy and respectful workplace for employees. The legislation also strengthened the RCMP's relationship with contract parties by building on accountability mechanisms included in the 2012-2032 Police Services Agreements.

The IM/IT program continued to restructure under a national enterprise model. Emphasis was placed on providing a consistent approach tRo IM/IT across the organization, with shared infrastructure, systems, expertise and costs. The RCMP also enhanced its use of business intelligence processes and technologies to transform raw data into meaningful and useful information in support of business decisions. The use of business intelligence in the RCMP represents a multi-year approach to deliver valuable, accurate and timely information at the strategic, operational and tactical levels.

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
2,758,076,493 2,853,116,277 3,057,718,197 2,892,380,696 39,264,419
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs]) Footnote 1
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
29,032 28,910 (122)

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2012-13
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2011-12
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Police Operations 1,636,666,754 1,697,370,944 1,588,258,670 1,583,572,559 1,845,256,093 1,761,000,036 1,913,573,311 1,667,296,027
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 243,875,567 247,552,262 246,951,544 241,010,583 256,166,042 241,130,536 260,304,114 256,203,400
Strategic Outcome 1 Sub-Total 1,880,542,321 1,944,923,206 1,835,210,214 1,824,583,142 2,101,422,135 2,002,130,572 2,173,877,425 1,923,499,428
Strategic Outcome 2: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2012-13
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2011-12
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
International Policing Operations 56,012,070 56,641,845 55,629,026 55,611,026 58,841,573 53,068,140 61,606,341 60,941,460
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 11,052,423 11,367,863 11,091,331 11,085,331 12,779,035 13,359,752 13,058,519 12,330,272
Strategic Outcome 2 Sub-Total 67,064,493 68,009,708 66,720,357 66,696,357 71,620,608 66,427,892 74,664,860 73,271,732
Strategic Outcome 3: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2012-13
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
2011-12
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Statutory Payments 142,186,657 148,486,740 164,898,076 183,613,215 148,601,130 147,142,744 134,622,883 122,818,236
Strategic Outcome 3 Sub-Total 142,186,657 148,486,740 164,898,076 183,613,215 148,601,130 147,142,744 134,622,883 122,818,236
Internal Services Sub-Total 668,283,022 691,696,623 647,196,641 656,392,315 736,074,324 676,679,488 741,234,191 854,986,416
Total 2,758,076,493 2,853,116,277 2,714,025,288 2,731,285,029 3,057,718,197 2,892,380,696 3,124,399,359 2,974,575,811

Analysis

At this time, the RCMP is only able to report financial and human resource information to the Program level. An implementation plan has been launched to report on authorities and expenditures to the Sub-program and Sub-sub-program level for inclusion in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report.

The RCMP's actual spending is higher than planned spending as a result of an increase to the 2013-14 Main Estimates with in-year temporary funding through Supplementary Estimates and allotment transfers from Treasury Board by $231 million. The majority of the increase ($221 million) related to the operating and capital carry forwards, together with funding received in support of First Nations Community Policing Services ($42 million). This funding was not included in the planned spending in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities. These increases were partially offset by the requirement to reduce spending authorities in 2013-14 as a result of a transfer to Shared Services Canada ($40 million).

Actual spending was $165 million less than total authorities available for use in 2013-14, which included $15 million in frozen allotments (funding not available for use in year) and $7 million in crown asset disposal proceeds available for use in 2014-15. This resulted in an overall real lapse of 4.7%. The majority of the lapse, $115 million, is within the capital vote, $70 million of which is related specifically to the Contract Policing Sub-program. Delays in Provincial and Territorial project approvals to proceed with capital plans, as well as reduced requirements caused by fiscal constraints at all levels of government, contributed to the lapse. The balance of the lapse, primarily in operating expenditures, can be attributed to the RCMP aligning its cost structure to implement savings initiatives announced in the 2012 Economic Action Plan. In 2013-14, savings were realized as a result of a number of key initiatives outlined in the 2013-14 Q3 Quarterly Financial Report including health care modernization and modifications to plain clothing and kit upkeep allowances. Lastly, lapses were offset by the RCMP not seeking reimbursement of eligible paylist expenditures in 2013-14.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2013-14 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework Footnote 2
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14
Actual Spending
($dollars)
Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced 1.1 Police Operations Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 1,761,000,036
1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 241,130,536
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally 2.1 International Policing Operations International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 53,068,140
2.2 Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 13,359,752
Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death 3.1 Statutory Payments Economic Affairs Income security and employment for Canadians 147,142,744
Total Spending by Spending Area
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
($dollars)
Total Actual Spending
($dollars)
Economic Affairs 148,486,740 147,142,744
Social Affairs 1,956,291,069 2,015,490,324
International Affairs 56,641,845 53,068,140
Government Affairs N/A N/A

Departmental Spending Trend

This table demonstrates data of the Actual and Planned Spending in millions of dollar for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Text description follows.

[ text version ]

Overall spending in 2013-14 is down approximately seven percent, or $232 million, as compared to 2012-13. The majority of the decrease is directly attributable to one-time disbursements made in 2012-13 related to the liquidation of severance pay. Footnote 3 These payments represented a $283 million decrease from 2012-13 to 2013-14. When the impact of the liquidation of severance pay is removed from year-over-year expenditures, there was a modest increase in salary of approximately two percent. This is related to the higher costs of Member and Public Service pay, as a result of negotiated pay increases and higher employer contributions to Superannuation and Employment Insurance. Increases were also experienced in overtime pay, due to operational responses to emergencies including the flooding in Alberta, police involvement in the Alberta jail strike and shale gas protests in New Brunswick. Additionally, there was a year-over-year increase of $17 million as a result of an actuarial deficiency in the RCMP Pension Fund Account as of March 31, 2014.

Other spending increases include payments made under the Grant to Compensate Members Injured in the Performance of their Duties, which saw a $14 million increase year-over-year. Payments under the grant are expected to continue to increase as a result of the number of members receiving disability pension awards, as well as annual increases related to the indexation of disability pension benefits. These anticipated increases are reflected in future years planned spending, along with projected funding from central agency vote transfers for paylist shortfalls. Other modest increases to planned spending are attributed to funding renewal initiatives, which include the National Counterfeit Enforcement Strategy and Refugee Reform.

Areas of spending increases are offset by an overall downward trend, as depicted in the Departmental Spending Trend Graph. This downward trend is expected to continue as 2014-15 marks the third and final year in which reference levels are reduced to meet the full savings target of $195.2 million announced in the 2012 Economic Action Plan. Footnote 4

Estimates by Vote

For information on the RCMP's organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website. Footnote 5

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Program 1.1: Police Operations

Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program provides Canadians with policing services at the federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels and within Aboriginal communities. As described in the RCMP Act, these services include all duties that are assigned to peace officers in relation to the preservation of the peace, the prevention of crime and of offences against the laws of Canada and the laws in force in any province in which they may be employed, and the apprehension of criminals and offenders and others who may be lawfully taken into custody; the execution of all warrants, and performing all duties and services in relation thereto, that may, under the RCMP Act or the laws of Canada or the laws in force in any province, be lawfully executed and performed by peace officers; performing all duties that may be lawfully performed by peace officers in relation to the escort and conveyance of convicts and other persons in custody to or from any courts, places of punishment or confinement, asylums or other places; and performing other duties and functions as are prescribed by the Governor in Council or the Commissioner. This Program contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities in addition to education and awareness activities delivered by employees of the RCMP to the public, businesses and other agencies/organizations within Canada. The RCMP's education and awareness activities - for example information sessions on crime prevention, national security, financial crime, drugs and organized crime - are aimed at reducing victimization of Canadians. Additionally, this Program ensures the protection of designated persons and security at major events which, in turn, mitigates any potential threats to Canada's population. The Program also delivers a high level of technical and operational support to ensure that the RCMP reaches its overarching goal of reducing criminal activity which affects Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
1,636,666,754 1,697,370,944 1,845,256,093 1,761,000,036 63,629,092
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
21,791 21,550 (241)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's contribution to a safe and secure Canada" 80% N/A Footnote 6
Severity level of crime in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions Footnote 7 96 Footnote 8 91.48
Per capita rate of crime Footnote 9 in Canada in RCMP jurisdictions 8,854 Footnote 10 8,392.49
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The success of a police organization and the ability to reduce criminal activity relies on several important factors. To measure the reduction of criminal activity affecting Canadians, indicators were selected to represent overall client satisfaction, police-reported crime and its severity index, as well as the perception of criminality.

The police-reported crime rate is the sum total of crime reported by police through the Uniform Crime Reporting survey, divided by the population (reported as a ratio per 100,000 population). In 2013-14, the crime rate across RCMP jurisdictions was 8,392.49, representing a decrease from 8,950.12 in 2012-13. This measure is further contextualized by the Crime Severity Index, which measures the seriousness of crime by taking into account the volume and the gravity of crime, and is calculated by assigning a weight to each offence type. The severity level of crime in Canada, in RCMP jurisdictions, was 91.48, representing a decrease from 97.56 in 2012-13.

The overall trend of decreased crime can be attributed to several initiatives undertaken throughout the year, which are discussed further throughout this report.

Sub-program 1.1.1: Contract Policing
Description

This Sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of provinces/territories, municipalities and Aboriginal communities across Canada by providing policing services to all provinces (except Ontario and Québec), three territories, over 180 municipalities and Aboriginal communities under the terms of the Police Service Agreements (PSAs) between Public Safety Canada (PS) and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. The PSAs consist of the Provincial Police Services Agreement (PPSA), the Municipal Police Services Agreement (MPSA) and the Community Tripartite Agreement where costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial/territorial and municipal governments. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws including, most notably, the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws. The RCMP contract policing model is an effective means to address the cross-jurisdictional evolving nature of crime and provide consistent policing services to Canadian communities. This Sub-program provides communities with an effective, highly trained police service which can seamlessly investigate local priorities that may have linkages to provincial, national and international investigations. Having this pool of highly trained police officers, from one end of the country to the other, enables the RCMP to quickly and successfully supply a large contingent of resources, which can respond rapidly to frontline emergencies and critical incidents, and also conduct investigations, enforcement and prevention, community policing and crime reduction activities.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadians have access to quality provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal policing services under contract Percentage of contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 11
RCMP weighted clearance rate Footnote 12 42.12 39.63
RCMP traditional clearance rate (not weighted) Footnote 13 Over 48 44.45
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Under the Police Services Agreements signed in 2012, the RCMP has focused its efforts on modernizing its relationship with federal government representatives and contract jurisdictions. The Contract Management Committee (CMC), developed through the PSAs, advanced several initiatives in 2013-14 including the consolidation of services, procurement and costs. Moreover, the management committee addressed issues related to firearms training, service delivery options, as well as research and feasibility studies on the implementation of specialized police equipment including body worn video and in-car video systems. Along with representatives from PS, the CMC has strengthened accountability between the RCMP and contract jurisdictions and has provided meaningful consultation for decision making.

Throughout the fiscal year, the RCMP committed to researching, developing and implementing best practices to support policing operations. The organization sought to raise public awareness of road safety issues and to address the leading causal factors in fatal and serious injury crashes including impaired driving. In a review of traffic-related objectives and initiatives across RCMP contract divisions, the most prominent cause for collisions, injuries and/or fatalities were identified as: driving while impaired under the influence of alcohol or drugs (both prescription and illicit); distracted driving; aggressive driving; and improper use of restraints. These results have helped inform a strategy that focused on education and awareness campaigns.

With equal attention on awareness and enforcement, all contract divisions participated in a day of action against impaired driving on December 7, 2013. Over 80,000 vehicles were screened for drivers exhibiting signs of impairment at 800 check-stops. By the end of the day, 131 criminal charges were laid for impaired driving by alcohol or drugs and 338 roadside licence suspensions or prohibitions were issued. A second day of action held on March 22, 2014 verified 54,000 vehicles and resulted in 157 criminal charges for impairment by alcohol or drugs and 341 suspensions issued over alcohol and/or drugs. After evaluating the success of the impaired driving strategy, the RCMP will continue to work across its divisions and with other police agencies and external partners on scheduling other enforcement initiatives.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.1: Provincial/Territorial Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of provinces/territories by providing policing services to all provinces (except Ontario and Québec) and three territories, under the terms of the PPSAs between PS and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. Costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial/territorial governments. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws including, most notably, the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadians have access to quality Provincial/Territorial policing services under contract Percentage of Provincial/Territorial contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 14
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To serve a country as large and diverse as Canada, the RCMP has adopted dynamic policies to ensure it can deliver leading edge policing to the provinces and territories. Following the RCMP's collaborative research with Defence Research and Development Canada, limitations were identified to the RCMP's firearms capabilities and options were proposed to address the existing gap. Based on independent research and extensive consultation with numerous internal and external partners completed between 2010 and 2011, the RCMP selected the Colt C8 patrol carbine for deployment for general duty policing. The carbines were shipped across RCMP divisions for operational use and distributed to qualified members who completed necessary training. In the spring of 2013, Operator Trainer and Instructor Trainer courses were made available to train RCMP members across Canada in the use and instruction on the patrol carbine.

During the reporting year, the RCMP continued to adopt the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), which are model aircraft equipped with cameras and remotely operated by pilots and observers on the ground. The RCMP corresponded with the Federal Privacy Commissioner to confirm parameters for the RCMP use of UAS, which are limited to crash scene investigations, traffic accident reconstructions, search and rescue, major crime investigations and Emergency Response Team calls for service. A national policy governing the use of UAS was approved in 2013 and the amount in service has grown from one unit in 2010 to over 55 units now in use across Canada.

Advancements have also been made in the organization's approach to regular, day-to-day policing. As a pilot project, the RCMP worked with the Saskatchewan government in its "Building Partnerships to Reduce Crime" strategy. Within the province, the RCMP has also continued its participation in Community Mobilization: Prince Albert, where resources from several agencies - including education, health, mental health services and local law enforcement - have formed a hub to consult on high priority cases. Essentially, the hub "connects people at risk to the services that can help them, when they need them most… [to]…stop crime before it happens". Footnote 15 Since 2010, violent crime in Prince Albert has been reduced by 37%. Footnote 16 Understanding that certain community factors impact these results, the RCMP will continue to work with local law enforcement to adopt the model in other jurisdictions including 10 new active hubs in Saskatchewan.

In the RCMP's "G" Division, Northwest Territories, an Arctic Intelligence Officer was appointed to establish relationships with government departments and agencies, as well as the business and academic community. This new position has allowed for the sharing of information on matters related to organized crime, maritime domain awareness and national security issues. The RCMP also continued to partner with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Canadian Coast Guard and the Department of National Defence (DND) to patrol the Mackenzie River and Mackenzie Delta under Operation Gateway. Taken together, the special projects, relationship building and information sharing taking place in "G" Division have added exponential value to the Canadian government's approach to issues related to Arctic sovereignty and security.

In "D" Division, Manitoba, the RCMP dedicated resources throughout the year to reduce the threat of serious and organized crime affecting Aboriginal communities. The Integrated Gang Intelligence Unit (IGIU), a provincially funded unit targeting street gang activity in Manitoba, conducted intelligence probes, executed and assisted with search warrants, and provided expertise and guidance on human source handling, intelligence gathering and street gangs. The IGIU also assisted with several RCMP investigation units including Project Devote, which addressed unsolved historical homicides and missing person cases involving exploited and at-risk persons.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.2: Municipal Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of municipalities across Canada by providing policing services to over 180 municipalities under the terms of the Municipal Police Service Agreements (MPSAs) between PS and the client governments for the provision of RCMP services. Costs of policing services are shared by federal and provincial/territorial and municipal governments; cost-share percentages are based on population. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws including, most notably, the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadians have access to quality Provincial/Territorial policing services under contract Percentage of Municipal contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides a high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 17
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP has established strong relationships with municipal contract partners, which have been enshrined in the MPSAs. The 2012 MPSAs included articles that addressed meaningful consultation and priority setting between the municipality and the RCMP, and emphasis was placed on local control and the respective responsibilities between the two parties. For example, community participation is now sought in the selection of detachment commanders. The community and RCMP also participate in priority setting prior to the creation of Annual Performance Plans, which set forth objectives, initiatives and risks for every RCMP detachment.

The MPSAs have regionalized some specialized functions (e.g., forensic identification) to provide better service, and have integrated others such as the creation of Integrated Homicide Investigation Teams. Police resourcing methodologies have been utilized to determine appropriate service levels, and service standards have been harmonized throughout the municipalities. These initiatives, along with the inclusion of a municipal representative on the Contract Management Committee, are intended to increase the satisfaction level of municipal contract clients with RCMP services.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.3: Aboriginal Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program addresses the law enforcement needs of Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal peoples under the terms of the Community Tripartite Agreements and the First Nations Policing Program. Costs are shared by federal, provincial/territorial and municipal governments as well as First Nation communities; cost-share depends on the selected agreement. RCMP services include enforcement of the laws of Canada under various Federal Acts and Provincial laws including, most notably, the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, Provincial statutes and Municipal bylaws.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Safer and healthier Aboriginal communities Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities"

Aboriginal Canadians: 80%

Aboriginal Leaders: 80%

Contract Policing Clients: 80%

N/A Footnote 18
Proportion of Aboriginal people who reported being victims of crime in a 12-month period TBD 37% Footnote 19
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To address the fact that Aboriginal women face considerably higher risks of violence and homicide, the RCMP conducted a review of missing and murdered Aboriginal women. This file review included all occurrences from RCMP files and every police agency across Canada, and was informed by the Sisters in Spirit Database, which was provided by the Native Women's Association of Canada. The review documented outstanding cases of missing Aboriginal females and all Aboriginal female homicides occurring between 1980 and 2012; of those, 164 were missing and 1,017 were murdered. The review was completed to identify risk factors and guide prevention strategies, and it will be an asset as policing resources are further invested in Aboriginal communities.

The RCMP continued to build and enhance successful partnerships, working proactively to prevent or resolve issues that affect communities. In 2013-14, the RCMP launched a recruitment drive for the Community Constable pilot program. The program was designed to provide communities with armed, uniformed peace officers who have specialized knowledge of the communities they serve including its language, culture and geography. The emphasis for these constables is to prevent and reduce crime, with a strong focus on community engagement.

For the past few years, the RCMP worked with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) under the auspices of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. In July 2013, over 300,000 pages of documentation on Indian residential schools were turned over to be incorporated into the TRC's research holdings. Eventually, these documents and other research will be housed at a national research centre where the history of Indian residential schools and their impact and legacy on Aboriginal communities will be documented. The RCMP also participated in several national events with the TRC to engage the Canadian public about the Indian residential school system, the experience of former students and their families, and the ongoing legacies of these institutions. RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson spoke at the final event of the TRC in Edmonton, Alberta in March 2014, where he offered a Star Blanket as a gesture of reconciliation.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.1.4: Airport Protective Policing
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides police presence at Vancouver, Edmonton, Halifax and Victoria airports under the terms of the Aeronautics Act and the Department of Transport Act. Police officers respond to emergency calls for service at Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) screening points and throughout the airport to protect travelers and transportation infrastructure. This Sub-sub-program is funded by relevant airport authorities.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The needs of airport policing clients are met Percentage of Provincial/Territorial contract clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides a high quality service" 75% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP and airport authorities have worked together to enhance police services provided to Vancouver, Victoria and Kelowna Airports. During the reporting cycle, detachment staff worked with security operations officers to develop a threat assessment, which included an analysis of police services. The report was presented to the Airport Authority Board for review and decision on funding for officers at airport hubs. Employees also worked on various plans and initiatives throughout the year and responded to emergency events including bomb and hijacking threats. At the conclusion of 2013-14, a survey was conducted to obtain feedback on RCMP services. One hundred percent of clients surveyed indicated that they were satisfied with the RCMP's responses to airport needs, which reflected positively on the work and initiatives completed by the Sub-sub-program.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Federal Policing
Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act and the RCMP Regulations, 1988, this Sub-program enforces federal laws and protects Canada's institutions, national security and Canadian and foreign dignitaries. Federal Policing preserves public safety and the integrity of Canada's political and economic systems.

The RCMP investigates serious and organized crime, economic crime (including corruption) and terrorist criminal activity. It also enforces federal statutes, collects criminal intelligence, conducts criminal investigations, secures Canada's borders and ensures the safety of major events, state officials, dignitaries and foreign missions.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Delivery of Federal Policing programs across Canada Federal Statute Crime rate per 100,000 403.77 389.97 Footnote 20
Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "I am satisfied with the RCMP's delivery of Federal Programs" 85% N/A Footnote 21
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, the RCMP launched a re-engineering of Federal Policing to redesign how the Sub-program delivered on its responsibilities. During the fiscal year, the Sub-program developed a new program structure and related processes capable of efficiently and effectively addressing operational priorities, with a focus on the nature of the criminal threat rather than the nature of the commodity. The redesign has allowed for greater information sharing through horizontal integration and provided a single point of contact for each of the divisions. The redesign included the development of a prioritization tool to facilitate the ability to prioritize files at both the divisional and national levels, creating greater consistency in operational decision making including the level of governance required. The prioritization tool allows for consideration of partner/client/stakeholder priorities and contributes to enhanced performance reporting.

As part of a broader plan to decentralize federal operations away from National Headquarters, the RCMP modified the mandate of "A" Division, Ottawa, with the objective of focusing on the highest priority and highest risk threats to Canada. In recognition of its new mandate (conducting specialized investigations and protective operations including high risk investigations into significant threats to Canada's political, economic and social integrity), "A" Division was recast as "National" Division in May 2013. In 2013-14, investigations focused on corruption of Canadian and foreign officials, procurement, Canada's electoral processes and leaks of government information.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.1: Drugs and Organized Crime
Description

This Sub-sub-program combats organized crime and drug-related activities through implementing intelligence-led police operations in partnership with a variety of domestic and international partners. It also works in partnership with domestic and international agencies to reduce the impact of organized crime activities and substance abuse issues through prevention, education and awareness. It also comprises a research and operational support component to enhance the effectiveness of these investigations and operations.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced impact of organized crime Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is reducing the threat and impact of organized crime" 80% N/A Footnote 22
Disruption of the number of significant organized crime activities identified in National Threat Assessments, Provincial Tactical Assessments or as National Tactical Enforcement Priorities 70 33 Footnote 23
Drug crimes are investigated Percentage of drug crime file clearance rate TBD 26.51% Footnote 24
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP made significant progress on its priority to combat drugs and organized crime. For example, a training initiative was developed with the chemical industry to provide information on diversion tactics, addressing criminals who, under false pretenses, attempt to legitimately acquire certain types of chemical products. Under the RCMP Chemical Diversion Program, members used a system of alerts to issue warnings about unregulated essential chemicals sought by organized crime in the production of synthetic drugs. Numerous tips were received from the industry, allowing investigators to identify new targets involved in the illicit synthetic drug trade.

The RCMP partnered with DND on a multi-jurisdictional marihuana eradication program named Operation SABOT. The Canada-wide operation located and destroyed outdoor illicit marihuana grow operations, resulting in the seizure of 42,051 marihuana plants in 2013-14.

Progress was also made on efforts to counter contraband tobacco. According to statistics compiled by Revenu Québec, the percentage of contraband tobacco in the cigarette market in the province dropped to 15% in 2013-14, a marked decrease compared to 40% in 2008 and 65% in 1994. Footnote 25 Revenu Québec attributed these results to recent integrated enforcement efforts from federal and provincial governments. The RCMP has been a key partner in the Contraband Tobacco Enforcement Strategy and has created a 50-member taskforce to address the issue. By the end of 2013-14, 75% of those positions had been filled, with additional staffing actions being completed in the spring of 2014.

Despite these successes, there are still some areas for improvement in the fight against contraband tobacco. In 2013-14, an evaluation was completed of the "Measures to Address Contraband Tobacco" horizontal initiative led by PS. The evaluation found that while outreach activity was widespread, insufficient information existed to determine if these activities increased awareness of the dangers of organized crime and its involvement in contraband tobacco. The RCMP has accepted the recommendations and will incorporate evaluation findings in future contraband tobacco strategies.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.2: Border Integrity
Description

This Sub-sub-program supports Canada's ability to manage its borders through leveraging partnerships to implement intelligence-led police operations in the detection and investigation of border breaches between the ports of entry and along Canada's coastlines. While contributing to the secure and effective international movement of people and goods, it also identifies and investigates criminal organizations which threaten the security of Canada's borders within, at or away from its borders.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's borders are protected from criminality Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is a valuable partner in protecting Canada's border"

Partners: 85%

Stakeholders: Baseline to be established

N/A Footnote 26
Number of organized crime groups involved in cross-border crime disrupted by or with support from Border Integrity units 15 1 Footnote 27
Reduction in the number of organized crime groups involved in cross-border crime Number of arrests and seizures as a result of the Shiprider Agreement TBD 1
Number of systems successfully connected to increase "between the ports" communication 2 2
In consultation with US law enforcement, the number of priority sensor gaps identified and the number of priority sensor gaps for which remedial measures have been developed TBD 0 Footnote 28
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As outlined in Beyond the Border Action Plan: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness, the RCMP has committed to integrating enforcement efforts along the Canada-United States border. Key to this action plan, the United States Coast Guard and the RCMP jointly announced the implementation of the Shiprider Agreement, which enabled enforcement vessels manned by Canadian and American officials to cross maritime borders in pursuit of suspects. In 2013-14, 66 officers were cross-designated for Shiprider Operations, conducting joint patrols and boarding and inspecting Canadian and American vessels.

Opportunities were also explored for enhanced cooperation between the two countries on land. Legal and governance frameworks were drafted to create dedicated teams of American and Canadian law enforcement officers specializing in border enforcement. Two "Next Generation" pilot projects were scheduled to be launched; however, due to unresolved issues involving protections and accountabilities, the pilot projects are in abeyance.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.3: Financial Crime
Description

This Sub-sub-program helps maintain the integrity of the Canadian economy by protecting Canadians, their governments and financial systems from financial crimes committed by criminal organizations and others.

It works in close partnership with domestic and international partners to take enforcement action and deliver awareness and prevention services against national and transnational financial crime activities.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced impact of economic crime Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is reducing the impact of economic crime" 80% N/A Footnote 29
Position of Canada in the Corruption Perceptions Index Top 10 9
Canadians are made aware of how organized crime impacts them financially Percentage of Canadians who received information from the RCMP, and who responded "yes clearly" or "yes vaguely" to the statement "The information made them more aware of ways in which they can avoid being the victim of financial crime (e.g., fraud, identify theft, etc.)" 60% N/A Footnote 30
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP made several operational gains in the fight against economic and financial crime. With the assistance of the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre, charges were laid against a Calgary investment company in connection with a $35 million Ponzi scheme. The RCMP was also involved in the first anti-corruption voluntary self-disclosure case. Griffiths Energy International Inc. self-reported potential violations of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (CFPOA), ultimately pleading guilty to a charge for bribing a foreign public official to secure oil production sharing contracts. This case illustrated the impact of awareness and outreach efforts conducted by the RCMP International Anti-Corruption group regarding the rights and responsibilities of individuals and businesses under the CFPOA.

Canadian efforts in combating bribery and corruption were also underscored in the latest report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Footnote 31 Bribery charges brought against executives at a technology company and SNC-Lavalin were used as evidence to improve Canada's position on the Corruption Perception Index. The Government of Canada was commended for proposed changes to the CFPOA that addressed a number of concerns previously raised by the OECD.

Following the Toronto Integrated Market Enforcement Team's (IMET) fraud investigation of Nortel Networks executives, the RCMP undertook a comprehensive debrief on the efficiency of the investigation, as the individuals charged were acquitted by the courts.

Key to these findings was the need to rely on traditional investigative techniques and tools; the importance of retaining investigative and support personnel during the life of the investigation and prosecution; and prioritizing the identification of criminal conduct and the collection of evidence. IMETs across Canada have incorporated these findings to continue to deter and detect capital market fraud.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.4: Federal Crime Enforcement
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides comprehensive criminal investigative services to federal government departments and agencies. The Sub-sub-program is responsible for conducting intelligence-led and reactive investigations into violations of federal statutes including those relating to: financial loss of the Government of Canada; public safety and consumer protection; transportation safety and security; environmental protection; and Canada's international obligations such as crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide. This Sub-sub-program contributes to increasing public confidence in the integrity of federal programs and services.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Reduced impact of federal statute crime on Canadians Other Federal Statute Crime Rate per 100,000 population TBD 66.79 Footnote 32
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP's Federal Crime Enforcement Sub-sub-program implemented several statutes and regulations through a combination of proactive and reactive strategies. Under the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking, the RCMP established a dedicated investigative and enforcement team in Montreal. This team worked with federal partners and provincial and local police to share information and intelligence, leading to the disruption of a Romanian network active in Montreal and Toronto. The arrests in 2013 were the culmination of Project Combative which had begun a year earlier.

The Sub-sub-program was also instrumental in the enforcement of the Copyright Act and trademark offences under the Criminal Code to protect Canadians from infringed products posing health and safety risks. The RCMP participated in INTERPOL's Operation Pangea VI, which targeted online counterfeit and unlicensed medicines. The operation spanned 100 countries and resulted in the seizure of 10.1 million counterfeit and illicit drugs, with an estimated street value of $36 million USD. In Canada, 2,282 packages originating from 20 countries were inspected. Of these, 1,869 packages were seized or refused entry as they contained 138,905 illicit and fake pharmaceutical products, with a street value of $627,384. Furthermore, the RCMP drafted a new Intellectual Property Crime Enforcement Strategy to target large scale shipments of counterfeit goods. This strategy will be implemented with the passing of Bill C-8, The Combating Counterfeit Products Act.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.5: National Security
Description

This Sub-sub-program conducts criminal investigations into offences related to domestic and international terrorism. The RCMP counters the criminal threat to the security of Canada, its citizens and institutions, under the authority of sections 7 and 83 of the Criminal Code of Canada, the Security Offences Act, and section 2(c) of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act. The RCMP conducts national security criminal investigations to detect, prevent, deny and investigate: terrorism and terrorist financing; threats to the security of Canada; threats against protected persons; threats to critical infrastructure; proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear incidents; the unlawful release of sensitive or classified information; piracy; offences against diplomats; protection of nuclear material; and torture.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Terrorist criminal activity is prevented, detected, responded to and denied Number of disruptions, through law enforcement actions, to the ability of a group(s) and/or an individual(s) to carry out terrorist criminal activity, or other criminal activity, that may pose a threat to national security in Canada and abroad 6 14 Footnote 33
Critical infrastructure information and intelligence products are created and delivered to stakeholders and partners Number of reports forwarded to private sector stakeholders and other partners to increase their situational awareness on threats 200 561 Footnote 34
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of the Government of Canada's Counterterrorism Strategy, the RCMP enhanced existing preventative strategies and products to counter violent extremism and radicalization to violence. The Sub-sub-program provided expertise and guidance to the Kanishka Initiative, a multi-year commitment to terrorism-focused research funded by the Government of Canada. RCMP representatives also contributed to the Global Terrorism Forum, providing operational guidance on subjects related to terrorist groups, foreign fighters and related policy advice.

The RCMP developed a framework to guide efforts on foreign fighters, in cooperation with other government departments and agencies. The framework set a continuum of actions to prevent individuals from leaving Canada to participate in terrorist training or terrorist activities, with guidance on disrupting their actions and addressing those returning to Canada who may have participated in terrorist activities abroad.

A "High Risk Travel Case Management" group was established under this framework, made up of agencies and departments responsible for examining and developing tailored responses to individual cases.

To address training objectives under the National Security program, the RCMP provided counterterrorism information officer training to 325 first responders including police, firefighters and emergency medical technicians. Training was also extended to partner agencies including CBSA, DND and CATSA. This training has provided first responders across the country with the ability to identify national security threats at the earliest possible stage.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.6: Protective Policing
Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act and RCMP Regulations, 1988, this Sub-sub-program provides security services for: Canadian government executives (the Governor General, his family and residences, the Prime Minister, his family and residences); visiting heads of state and foreign diplomats in Canada and their residences; internationally protected persons; and persons designated by the Minister of PS as requiring security. Through the Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program (CACPP), it places covert, tactical operatives, known as In-Flight Security Officers (IFSOs), on board select domestic and international flights. This Sub-sub-program is necessary in order to protect identified "at-risk" flights and, on behalf of the Government of Canada, it routinely assesses and validates foreign IFSO programs prior to the placement of their IFSOs on flights destined to Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Protectees are protected Percentage of protectees who responded that they were satisfied with the level of service provided by Protective Policing 80% N/A Footnote 35
Number of incidents that threatened the safety of RCMP protectees 0 0
Sites are protected Number of incidents that threatened the security of Canadian interests 0 0
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Under the Federal Policing re-engineering initiative, Protective Policing established an oversight and compliance unit to review and analyze all activities undertaken by the Sub-sub-program throughout the year. This process amounted to a quality assurance review and identified best practices and efficiencies by looking at divisional VIP units, the Prime Minister's Protection Detail and the Governor General's Protection Detail. One identified best practice involved the Protective Policing Decision Matrix, a structured, evidence-based and intelligence-informed process that facilitates and supports decision making while providing for a consistent approach. Such efforts have ultimately increased the level of transparency and accountability for the Sub-sub-program.

To enhance the capacity and capability of the Sub-sub-program, the CACPP signed a number of international IFSO agreements with government partners. IFSOs were also included in The Convention on Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed On Board Aircraft, commonly known as the Tokyo Convention. The international treaty was amended to include a separate category for IFSOs, providing them with the authority to carry out their duties. These legislative efforts have translated into greater operational readiness including the deployment of IFSOs on appropriate designated flights to mitigate the risk of foreign fighters travelling abroad.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.2.7: Protection Coordination Unit
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides major event security planning, guidance and oversight to divisional planners responsible for delivering security and protection services for events hosted by the Government of Canada. Security planning subject matter experts aid divisional planners by developing specific event software platforms and reference material as well as delivering "hands on" operational assistance. The RCMP mandate to secure these types of events comes from the Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act, the Security Offences Act, the RCMP Act and RCMP Regulations, 1988, the Criminal Code of Canada as well as common law. This Sub-sub-program also provides coordination and file management for centralized security and protection during royal visits, Federal Cabinet meetings and official party leaders during federal elections.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government-led high profile events are secured Percentage of events successfully secured 100% 100%
Percentage of incidents that compromised Canadian interests at a major event 0% 0%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to lead efforts within the international protective policing community to standardize tactics and identify operational efficiencies. As a member of the Association of Personal Protective Services, the RCMP took part in working groups tasked with exploring the future of protective policing and improving international collaboration during VIP visits. Support and guidance was also provided to the Ontario Provincial Police in the development of a security concept operation for the 2015 PanAm Games.

The Sub-sub-program presided over several operational successes in 2013-14, including the visits of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, His Royal Highness the Duke of York, Her Royal Highness the Princess Royal and Their Royal Highnesses the Earl and Countess of Wessex. Furthermore, in its role as a security liaison, the RCMP provided assistance to Canadian athletes during the 2014 Sochi Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Technical Services and Operational Support
Description

This Sub-program encompasses a variety of special investigative services in addition to researching, developing, deploying and integrating a broad assortment of investigative tools, techniques, methodologies and equipment required by the RCMP and its law enforcement partners to prevent and investigate criminal activity. It also offers operational support, advice, management, policy and training to ensure the availability of technical tools and specialized expertise.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technical services are provided to policing operations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the technical services/operational support received was of a high quality" 80% N/A Footnote 36
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Technical Services and Operational Support provided frontline police officers with specialized investigative and operational services including state-of-the-art technological tools, procedures and research and development. To meet demands for service and improve client satisfaction, the Sub-program underwent an internal restructuring. Technical Investigation Services underwent reorganization to consolidate its operational mandate under one area so as to prioritize research and development and integrate common services. A similar strategy was implemented with its engineering resources.

From March to June 2013, Project Snapshot II, a regional proactive child exploitation operation, took place in the Atlantic Region and resulted in the preparation and distribution of 30 investigational packages, the execution of 23 search warrants and 22 arrests. As of October 2013, 20 individuals were charged, for a total of 64 charges. The Technology Unit provided investigative and technical assistance to both the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary and "B" Division in the execution of nine search warrants.

Investigators with Project Snapshot are exploring the collected data to determine if any links can be established through empirical evidence between the downloading of various forms of child pornography and hands-on contact offences. Data collected from two national investigations (Project Snapshot I and Snapshot II) is being compiled and analyzed as part of an ongoing research project.

A preliminary analysis of the data was completed in fall 2013, with more advanced analyses to follow as additional data is collected. Project Snapshot will continue into 2014 with the launch of Snapshot III, which will have a national scope. Additional information obtained will be used to inform national and international law enforcement agencies.

Throughout the year, the Sub-program also coordinated responses and documentation for internal audits on the Technological Crime Program (TCP) and Personnel Security Unit. Footnote 37 The implementation of the recommendations from the TCP audit is ongoing. The Personnel Security review noted continued discrepancies in business processes and practices first identified in 2010. To address these inconsistencies, the National Administrative Records Management System was selected to implement and monitor performance measures, assist in conducting quality assurance activities, and ensure compliance with established processes and standards. The audit also served as the catalyst to the Departmental Security Branch national program review, which includes IT Security, Physical Security and Personnel Security.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.1: Technical Investigations
Description

This Sub-sub-program ensures the availability of state of the art technological tools and procedures for the RCMP and other law enforcement agencies to assist in the investigation of criminal and terrorist activities. This includes the lawfully authorized interception of communications, covert entry, pure computer crime, Internet intercepts, seizure and forensic analysis. In addition, it also ensures the expertise regarding the criminal use of Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear substances and Explosives (CBRNE). Program funds are expended on personnel, technology, systems, operations and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Tools, techniques and specialized expertise are provided to policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the tools, techniques and specialized expertise provided to law enforcement agencies 80% N/A Footnote 38
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Technical Investigation Services collaborated with internal and external partners to improve the overall effectiveness and efficiency of technical solutions available for investigations. A new approach was developed for investigators which explored project circumstances, identified technical challenges and assembled groups to devise scenarios and address potential challenges. From there, existing techniques were combined for investigations, which replaced the cumbersome process of generating new and intricate solutions for each specific investigation. In 2013-14, Technical Investigation Services supported 289 national security and serious crime investigations using lawful access capability. Additionally, the Sub-sub-program developed 10 network interception tools/solutions and deployed 13 new features to decode data.

The Sub-sub-program continued to develop expertise related to CBRNE Operations. CBRNE and scientific colleagues cooperated in exercises and no-notice operations to develop skills and techniques that could prove useful for future CBRNE response operations. Scientists and technicians collaborated in the planning and execution of several National CBRNE response team exercises including domestic and international events, and the CBRNE training program provided training to some 200 responders and investigators. RCMP CBRNE Operations, which is integrated with the Ottawa Police Service, responded to 80 calls for service regarding suspicious packages, powders and devices in the National Capital Region (NCR) during the reporting period. Moreover, the CBRNE Police Service Dog unit received 70 calls to conduct Very Important Person related searches. In addition to the CBRNE calls for service, the Canadian Bomb Data Centre received approximately 600 calls for service and/or inquires.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.2: Protective Technologies
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides technologies and systems to protect individuals and assets for which the RCMP is responsible. This entails the deployment and implementation of electronic/mechanical/physical security systems for the protection of Internationally Protected Persons and Very Important Persons at over 175 sites, major events (G8, North American Leaders' Summit), undercover members, witnesses, safe houses, crime scenes, exhibits and sensitive operational sections of the RCMP. Program funds are expended on personnel, technology, systems, corporate security, assets, operations and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
RCMP technologies and systems protect individuals and assets Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the electronic/mechanical/physical security systems provided by Technical Operations 70% N/A Footnote 39
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In light of evolving technologies and systems, the Protective Technologies Sub-sub-program introduced several projects to continue to protect individuals and assets. A new contract was established for the procurement of in-car digital video systems which incorporate video and audio recording capabilities for police cars. Up to three cameras and two audio streams permit officers to record at the touch of a button, with an audit log track and warning system should any problems with the system arise. The wireless microphone, which is body-worn, is easily operable by the officer.

The RCMP also implemented the Next Generation Corporate Security Amalgamated System (CSAS), an enterprise-wide approach for protective technologies for RCMP facilities and assets including panic alarms, intrusion detection and access control through secure smart cards. The five-year strategy will see RCMP divisions continue to upgrade readers and common access cards for physical and logistical access to RCMP assets. During the reporting year, buildings in the NCR and headquarters in "E" Division British Columbia and "H" Division Nova Scotia were migrated to the new system. The Sub-sub-program received 38,137 transaction requests regarding the CSAS within the NCR, which included the installation/maintenance of 814 card readers, 785 intrusion zones and the management of 18,027 secure access smart cards.

Further security projects were also undertaken in the NCR. The Perimeter Security Project introduced new, technologically advanced types of physical security for Parliament Hill. For example, a series of bollards were installed to restrict and control vehicular access. Authorized vehicles allowed on the Hill must now go through a two-factor authentication process to be granted access to the site. These endeavours have helped protect Members of the House of Commons, the Senate and the general public who are visiting the Hill.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.3: Flight Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides direct operational and administrative air service to RCMP frontline police officers, other government departments and law enforcement agencies. This Sub-sub-program is necessary as it helps prevent and investigate crime and ensure the security of individuals.

The RCMP has a fleet of 40 aircraft (including 31 fixed wings and nine helicopters). Program funds are expended on personnel, security, assets, operations and maintenance of aircrafts.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Airborne capacity supports policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the flight services provided by Air Services 85% N/A Footnote 40
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, RCMP Air Services flew a total of 19,728 hours, which included approximately 6,580 flight legs. These hours were devoted to the transportation of prisoners, exhibits, passengers, surveillance, border patrol and operational support.

In 2013, Transport Canada (TC) was invited to assess and conduct an advisory assessment of the Flight Operations Sub-sub-program. The TC team consisted of inspectors with experience in operational fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft and maintenance. The summary report identified eight recommendations, many of which were implemented by the end of the fiscal year.

The report recommended key amendments to the Safety Management System (SMS) manual. The manual, which documents policies and procedures for Flight Operations, was updated to clarify the responsibility of members for their own safety, the safety of their colleagues and the conduct of safe operations within the workplace. Likewise, an internal filing system was created to track all reported hazards and incidents in accordance with SMS requirements. Additional recommendations will be implemented in 2014-15 including the implementation of new SMS software to identify hazards, mitigate risks, assign corrective actions, generate reports and track reoccurring trends.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.4: Disclosure and Major Case Management
Description

This Sub-sub-program develops, implements and promotes a standardized method in using an electronic major case management system that is in line with existing record management policies. This Sub-sub-program is necessary as it ensures proper disclosure of all information gathered by police during the course of an investigation.

Disclosure and Major Case Management provides operational support internally to the RCMP as well as to integrated partners across the country.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Electronic major case management (eMCM) and disclosure support policing operations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with support received in relation to eMCM and disclosure TBD N/A Footnote 41
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Disclosure and Major Case Management has spent the past few years working with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) to implement a web-based disclosure pilot project. This project was undertaken to examine the efficiency and financial value of web-based disclosure, as compared to conventional disclosure methods by hard drive or paper. A proposed Memorandum of Understanding between PPSC and le Directeur des poursuites criminelles et pénales du Québec was drafted and is awaiting signature. Efforts were also undertaken to identify suitable cases for the pilot project. This project was one of multiple initiatives considered by the RCMP as it renews its information management processes over the next three to five fiscal years.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.5: Scientific Services/Technologies
Description

This Sub-sub-program offers analytical tools, systems and scientific methodologies to enhance criminal investigations through the study of criminal activity. It encompasses specialized operational and analytical investigative capabilities for Canadian and international policing communities and its services include criminal investigative analysis, geographic profiling, and polygraph and statement analysis. Program funds are expended on personnel, operations, technology, assets and research and development.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Analytical capabilities study criminal activity to support criminal investigations Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the specialized investigative analytical capabilities provided by Technical Operations 85% N/A Footnote 42
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the RCMP's Criminal Profiling Unit, as part of the Behavioural Sciences and International Operations section, received 83 requests for assistance with investigative techniques. These requests ranged from interviews and interrogations to threat assessments, linguistic analysis, linkage analysis and statement analysis. These techniques were used in a range of investigations including homicides, abductions, bombings, threat cases, child exploitation, sexual assaults, hostage takings, arson, extortion and several unsolved serial crimes.

In January 2013, major crime investigators in Yellowknife sought the assistance of the Sub-sub-program for an unsolved murder. Upon review of the case, profilers determined that the murder occurred elsewhere from where the body had been discovered. The profilers also provided some likely traits and characteristics of the offender, which were linked to a person of interest who eventually confessed to the crime. The Criminal Profiling Unit also provided interview and interrogation strategies to investigators in Halifax looking into a murder committed in May 2013. Using these techniques, investigators obtained a confession from the suspect as well as information that would only have been known to the offender.

Moreover, the Sub-sub-program conducted 746 forensic polygraph examinations and analyzed 601 veracity questionnaires and 69 written statements for operational files. In support of national recruiting efforts, 1,557 pre-employment polygraph examinations were completed and RCMP polygraph examiners spent approximately 212 days providing interview training to RCMP members.

The Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System (ViCLAS) is a Canada-wide computer system that assists specially trained investigators in identifying serial crimes and criminals by focusing on the behavioural linkages that exist among crimes that may have been committed by the same offender. In 2013-14, some 25,000 new cases were entered into the system, bringing the total to 471,297 cases since its inception. During the course of this same time period, 4,755 cases were analyzed by ViCLAS specialists, resulting in 267 confirmed links between offenders and occurrences.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.6: Operational Readiness and Response
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides a central point of contact for emergency management and incident response across the RCMP, ensuring a coordinated and timely response to any emergencies, critical incidents or disasters. This includes: the National Operations Centre, a fully secure and integrated command and control centre for centralized monitoring and coordination during critical incidents and major events; business continuity planning and emergency management with a focus on preparedness and workforce resilience as mandated by the Emergency Management Act; and maintaining specialized teams and resources such as emergency response teams, emergency response medical teams, Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear responders, crisis negotiators and incident commanders.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The RCMP is prepared to respond to all-hazards emergencies and critical incidents Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is prepared to respond to emergencies and critical incidents" 80% 91%
Percentage of critical incidents where the RCMP was not adequately prepared 0% 0%
Business Continuity Plans cover all RCMP employees Percentage of RCMP employees covered by a Business Continuity Plan 100% 75% Footnote 43
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP completed an audit of Business Continuity Plans in 2010, providing four recommendations to improve oversight, monitoring and quality assurance. Work on these recommendations is ongoing and 2013-14 saw the launch of a national project to identify and prioritize critical services and assets. RCMP divisions, at the local level, were tasked with ensuring that they had up-to-date plans that covered all employees within their jurisdiction. With an average of 75% of employees covered in 2013-14, the RCMP will continue its efforts to have all employees covered by a plan to ensure the organization is prepared to respond to emergencies and critical incidents.

The RCMP is mandated by the Canada Labour Code to ensure its employees are provided with appropriate safety equipment for their operational environment. Moreover, to achieve operational cohesiveness, the RCMP is required to standardize its equipment and training to ensure all employees are familiar with the features, characteristics and limitations of equipment. In 2013-14, the Sub-sub-program was responsible for standardizing equipment and training for Emergency Response Team (ERT) marine operations, incorporating resources from various agencies including CBSA, the Canadian Coast Guard and DND. Understanding equipment items, along with the ability to operate with outside agencies, is crucial to the safety of RCMP personnel in the event of a critical incident. As such, training and exercises took place throughout the year to test the equipment newly introduced for ERT marine operations.

Sub-sub-program 1.1.3.7: Covert Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides support and direction to operational field units for high risk programs such as undercover operations, source development, witness protection and human source programs. This Sub-sub-program is necessary to ensure proper oversight, accountability, training and backstopping requirements leading to successful investigations and the safety of police officers. It is also crucial in the application and management of source witness protection measures as they are applied to witnesses, informants and police agents pursuant to the Witness Protection Program Act and the use, handling and recruiting of police informants and agents in the context of operations and major investigations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Covert operation policy direction, program oversight and training are provided to divisions Percentage of internal clients who strongly agree or agree with the statement "we are satisfied with covert operations services provided" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 44
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Legislative frameworks governing Covert Operations were revised under the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act, which received Royal Assent in June 2013. The amendments, which were incorporated by the Sub-sub-program during the fiscal year, provide the necessary mechanisms to protect covert activities and ensure the integrity of operations. Moreover, two sections under the Victims Bill of Rights (Bill C-32) were modified to protect the identity of undercover operators in court. Under subsection 486.2(2) and (3) of the Criminal Code, testimony is now allowed outside court or behind a screen or other device, while section 486.31 allows for the non-disclosure of witness identity.

Along with these legislative changes, Covert Operations has implemented new investigational procedures. These changes stemmed from a Quebec Appeal Court decision which criticized RCMP handling of a drug trafficker who had gathered evidence of criminal activity. Footnote 45 Although the individual was acting under the direction of police in his activities, the court was concerned that the RCMP had not mentioned these activities to federal corrections partners as the individual was on parole. Prosecutions against several alleged drug traffickers were abandoned and immediate, remedial action was taken by the Sub-sub-program to ensure that key federal partners will be engaged in future investigational efforts.

Program 1.2: Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Description

This Program provides the Canadian law enforcement community with the necessary scientific, technical, investigative and educational support to deliver proactive, intelligence based policing and law enforcement services to their respective communities and partners. Additionally, this Program provides educational opportunities to members of the Canadian law enforcement community to enable them to develop their skills thus increasing their effectiveness in contributing to a safer Canada. This Program is necessary to ensure that Canadian law enforcement communities have access to the required tools, systems, technologies (i.e., forensic support and expertise, criminal intelligence and firearms registry and databases, etc.) and education which, in turn, will contribute to the reduction of criminal activity affecting Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
243,875,567 247,552,262 256,166,042 241,130,536 (6,421,726)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,325 1,885 (440)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technical, forensic, investigative and educational activities support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "overall the RCMP provides high quality service" 80% N/A Footnote 46
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

While the RCMP continues to take steps to appropriately manage finite resources, demands for services from both law enforcement and the public sector on the Canadian Law Enforcement Services Program have grown. In 2010, the National Police Services (NPS) Renewal and Sustainability Initiative was launched to address issues of mandate, governance and funding, and to set the long-term strategic direction of NPS.

As part of this initiative, the Government of Canada renegotiated the Biology Casework Analysis Agreements with the provinces and territories that receive forensic DNA analysis services from the RCMP. This critical service has experienced significant increases in cost and demand over the past decade, without a corresponding increase in provincial and territorial payments. Under these new agreements, provinces and territories will return to paying 54% of the costs associated with this service as was agreed to in 2004. The RCMP has obtained respendable revenue authority from Treasury Board for provincial and territorial payments, which will provide long-term sustainability for DNA analysis.

To ensure the continued provision of quality support services, the RCMP devoted significant effort to improving its IM/IT program. First, an enterprise approach was adopted to clarify authorities and accountability across RCMP divisions and business lines. Second, several business solutions were implemented including the migration to Windows 7 and the adoption of new office productivity software, which resulted in increased efficiencies and interoperability with Canadian law enforcement partners. A national governance model was also established to ensure proper alignment and prioritization in the delivery of IM/IT services.

In support of operations, the RCMP is leading the Bi-National Interoperability Project under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This project, once completed, will result in the common use of Internet for radio and voice communication between Canadian and American law enforcement. In 2013-14, the second phase of delivering "Radio over Internet Protocol" was implemented in Quebec and New Brunswick, following a successful launch in Ontario and British Columbia. These endeavours were important milestones in continuing the cooperative approach launched under the action plan to combat cross-border crime.

Sub-program 1.2.1: Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support
Description

This Sub-program includes highly specialized programs of a scientific and technical nature supporting the entire law enforcement community at both a national and international level. This operational support to investigators enables the identification of criminals through the forensic analysis of physical or biological evidence, the reduction of crime through the collection of actionable intelligence, and the enhancement of public safety through the maintenance of accurate data and information pertaining to crimes and criminals. This area of scientific expertise supports international programs through disaster victim identification, collaborates with investigators worldwide with respect to missing and exploited children, links criminals to crimes through DNA analysis, and supports other government programs such as immigration and other border management initiatives through its criminal information data bank.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Scientific, Technical and Investigative services support Canada's law enforcement community Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "overall the RCMP provides high quality Scientific, Technical and Investigative services" 80% N/A Footnote 47
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to provide scientific, technical and investigative services to its own police operations as well as to the wider Canadian law enforcement community. In the past year, the RCMP focused its efforts on maintaining the financial sustainability of its research and support programs to ensure there would be no impact to the support offered to frontline services. Selected areas within the Sub-program were asked to develop accountability frameworks, which allowed the RCMP to identify resources and their impact on mandated activities.

Additional activities were undertaken by the Sub-program to ensure overall sustainability. This included the reduction of laboratory service sites from six to three, a plan which will be completed in 2014-15. The RCMP is also pursuing a strategy that will require electronic fingerprinting for civil purposes across Canada. This is a multi-year project that will increase the efficiency of the civil screening process.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.1: Integrated Forensic Identification Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program is necessary to ensure that the RCMP, in all jurisdictions, provides consistent high quality crime scene examinations, such that the analysis and comparison of all physical and impression evidence located and evaluated meets or exceeds the standards that the courts expect from forensic opinion evidence. Specifically, the Sub-sub-program establishes, implements, monitors and improves all necessary policies, standards, processes, tools, technology, training, best practices and health and safety directives for forensic identification. These include crime scene forensic examinations, identification and collection of exhibits for scientific analysis, fingerprint analysis, footwear impression comparisons, tire track comparisons, forensic facial imaging analysis, forensic video analysis and disaster victim identification. In addition, this Sub-sub-program commands frontline operational units across Canada for: bloodstain pattern analysis investigation; CBRNE crime scene investigation; and forensic, scientific and aerial reconnaissance imaging.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Integrated Forensic Identification Services provide support services to frontline operational officers Percentage of latent fingerprints found during case examination identified to individuals with a criminal record 40% 36%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For more than 100 years, the justice system regarded fingerprint identification as reliable and very rarely contested evidence. This confidence was shaken internationally with recent high profile inquiries into misidentifications Footnote 48 by experienced latent fingerprint examiners. As such, the RCMP's Integrated Forensic Identification Services (IFIS) led the establishment of and provided secretariat support to the Canadian Friction Ridge Working Group (CanFRWG). This group has worked to ensure that the forensic identification community has access to current information on challenges to expert testimony for fingerprint identification within Canadian courts. In 2013, CanFRWG delivered a comprehensive communications tool for forensic identification specialists for this purpose. The tool will be used when working with counsel to prepare expert testimony, as well as for the actual presentation of evidence and testimony in court.

In 2013-14, the Real Time Identification (RTID) system was enhanced to search latent palm marks collected from crime scenes, process into high quality digital images and submit through the IFIS Regional Automated Fingerprint Identification Access System. This new functionality has provided crime scene examiners with an additional opportunity to identify suspects, and the first identification to a crime scene palm print occurred on August 20, 2013. To address this recent technological advancement, CanFRWG has prepared supporting material to address the topic of complex palm print identification to Canadian courts.

The Sub-sub-program also implemented a national strategy to process polymer banknotes issued in Canada since 2011. New techniques to develop latent fingerprints were required, as the traditional wet chemistry methods used on paper banknotes did not work on polymer banknotes. In partnership with Canadian universities, forensic crime scene investigators and IFIS scientists, a protocol was found that would yield clear prints. Footnote 49 The technology, which is now in use in Ottawa, has also proven to be effective at detecting latent fingerprints on cold case exhibits that have been in storage for several years. Due to these successes, additional technology has been proposed for purchase in Montreal, Newmarket (Ontario) and Vancouver.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.2: Forensic Laboratory Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program supports police investigations through the provision of forensic identification and analysis of exhibit materials used as evidence. This involves the examination, interpretation and reporting of evidence related to physical and/or biological material exhibits from, or pertaining to, a crime scene or criminal investigation. Support is provided to evidence related to biology services (i.e., DNA analysis), document and counterfeit examinations, trace evidence, explosives, toxicology and firearms.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Timely forensic laboratory services support the policing and criminal justice system Percentage of forensic laboratory service requests completed by target time, by program 85%

Biology: 41%

Firearms: 57%

National Anti-Counterfeiting Bureau: 86%

Toxicology: 78%

Trace Evidence: 73%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To improve efficiency and timely service delivery, the RCMP consolidated its Forensic Laboratory Services from six to three delivery sites. Laboratories in Regina and Winnipeg were officially closed at the end of the fiscal year. The third laboratory, located in Halifax, will be closed by March 31, 2015. This consolidation also reduced duplication and infrastructure costs so that by year-end financial targets for site consolidation had been met. Throughout the process, emphasis was placed on minimizing impact to overall service capacity so that requests were completed by target time. To achieve this goal, employees were cross-trained to create a flexible workforce and vacant positions were strategically staffed so that new colleagues were efficiently trained to meet casework demands. What is more, since the development and implementation of a Biology Action Plan, biology backlogs decreased from 273 service requests in March 2013 to 113 requests in March 2014.

In addition to the consolidation exercise, Forensic Science Operations advanced several initiatives to leverage innovation and technology. The National Anti-Counterfeiting Bureau introduced an instrument to evaluate polymer banknotes, and the RCMP's Trace Evidence unit purchased an SEM-Raman instrument to increase detection capabilities for nano-scale explosives residue. Biology Services also evaluated new kits to increase the quality and discrimination of DNA profiles, which will be fully implemented in 2014-15.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.3: Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides direct operational support on a 24/7/365 basis to the Canadian law enforcement, criminal justice and public security communities as well as international partners such as the FBI and INTERPOL for criminal, civil and immigration purposes. The Sub-sub-program maintains Canada's national repository of criminal records and biometric (fingerprint) information. It is responsible for maintaining and making accurate and up-to-date criminal record information available to authorized agencies in accordance with federal laws. Criminal record information is used by the Canadian law enforcement community in support of combating crime and by authorized agencies for civil purposes such as conducting civil screening for employment, volunteer work, adoption requests and vulnerable sector checks, among other non-criminal purposes. In addition, the program conducts fingerprint-based criminal record checks for civil screening purposes including vulnerable sector checks. Program services include, but are not limited to: criminal record and fingerprint identification; maintaining criminal records in accordance with federal laws; identifying latent fingerprints; supporting Government of Canada immigration and border management programs; analyzing biometric IT solutions; and measuring performance for client service delivery.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Technology used by the national repository of fingerprint and criminal record information supports Canadian law enforcement Number of devices sending electronic fingerprint submissions to RTID 950 654 Footnote 50
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RTID Project was designed over the past few years to facilitate the timely and efficient exchange of criminal records and fingerprint information. The project transformed the paper-based model to an electronic workflow, enabling the "real time" identification of fingerprints submitted electronically. At the start of the project, a civil fingerprint verification not linked to a criminal record could take up to five months; under RTID, the time was decreased to three business days. Fingerprint verification of refugee and criminal searches were decreased from weeks of processing to a matter of hours, and less than three days in the case of latent (criminal scene) fingerprints.

To meet evolving technological needs of the Canadian law enforcement community, Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services deploys devices to electronically submit criminal and civil fingerprints through RTID. By the end of the fiscal year, 492 devices had been deployed to law enforcement agencies.

An additional 162 devices were sent to federal and provincial departments and private agencies with the capability to submit civil and criminal prints. A further 254 devices were acquired in 2013-14 and will be operational in September 2014. With these tools, 41% of criminal prints and 82% of civil prints are now submitted electronically, greatly improving response and delivery times in fingerprint searches.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.4: National Services and Research Support (Forensic)
Description

This Sub-sub-program ensures that the processes used for forensic analysis are scientifically valid and reliable and are based on the application of the scientific method. It ensures that research projects are developed according to scientific methods and are appropriately funded and resourced. This Sub-sub-program also maintains the National DNA Data Bank and assists law enforcement agencies by using DNA evidence to link crime scenes and to link crime scenes to convicted offenders.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The National DNA Data Bank supports criminal investigations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the National DNA Data Bank contributes value to criminal investigations" 80% 83%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The National DNA Data Bank (NDDB), managed by National Services and Research Support, is integral to the evolving nature of criminal investigations. To integrate the latest scientific methods and advances, the NDDB completed final validation and development of new workflows and methodology for direct amplification technologies associated with DNA kits. Standard operating procedures were developed, staff training was completed and the Standards Council of Canada approved the associated changes to the laboratory's ISO accreditation scope. In addition, a new customized laboratory information management system was implemented for all new NDDB processes.

These technical, workflow and information management system changes will decrease processing time and allow faster reporting of crime scene and convicted offender DNA match results for criminal investigations. Further, these efficiencies will enable the NDDB to process many more samples, which will be important as designated offences are updated yearly under the DNA Identification Act.

The NDDB's processes also rely on the proper collection and submission of samples. To this end, convicted offender DNA sample collection training was provided to investigators and court personnel in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.5: Criminal Intelligence
Description

This Sub-sub-program, as an integral part of law enforcement operations, is focused on the provision of comprehensive, timely assessments of criminal organizations and their activities with the goal of providing actionable intelligence aimed at more effectively controlling, reducing and preventing organized and serious crime in all communities across Canada. An intelligence-led approach to operations also serves to assist in the development and implementation of effective public policy, crime reduction and prevention strategies.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Intelligence-led policing is supported Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP Criminal Intelligence Program is making an important contribution to intelligence-led policing in Canada" 80% N/A Footnote 51
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to improve its ability to collect, analyze and disseminate criminal intelligence in support of police operations. The National Intelligence Coordination Centre identified and developed intelligence on emerging crime threats and networks, while the priority section developed operational intelligence on criminal threats identified by the National Integrated Operations Council. In 2013-14, analysts were deployed internationally to countries of operational significance to proactively identify criminal threats and emerging trends which could impact Canada, Canadians and Canadian interests. These coordinated operational and intelligence efforts have led to the detection of key strategic linkages between Canadian organized crime groups and organized crime groups operating abroad.

Through Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC), the RCMP provided comprehensive and timely assessments of criminal organizations in support of the Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime. CISC also made progress on the National Strategy to Combat Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs, with an assessment conducted in 2013-14 to assist in setting operational priorities. Moreover, educational workshops on the topic of outlaw motorcycle gangs were conducted throughout the year to support expert witnesses and investigators.

In 2013-14, the CISC National Executive Committee, in partnership with the Canadian law enforcement community, endorsed a new common threat criteria and business rules for the integration of the threat assessment process. The resulting threat assessments, which were provided at the national and provincial level, have delivered actionable intelligence through the year to identify operation priorities related to serious and organized crime.

CISC has also worked to facilitate and improve the sharing of information on criminal organizations and activities. New technological tools have enhanced the performance of the national database on serious and organization crime. In addition, a national communication strategy was developed to raise awareness about the benefits of information sharing to address the multi-jurisdictional nature of crime. These efforts have continued to strengthen the alignment between intelligence and operations, all in support of intelligence-led policing.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.6: Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
Description

This Sub-sub-program is a National Police Service supported by Treasury Board, which provides a secure online database of information on subjects, vehicles, boats and properties that may be linked to criminal justice and public safety activities. The database also stores other useful tactical information. Access to this information may be granted to specific users within the Canadian law enforcement community, other investigative bodies and strategic partners worldwide. The first component consists of a central police database that provides information to public safety partners on crimes and criminals. The second component consists of the Police Information Portal (PIP), which is an integrated master indexing and records management gateway allowing police agencies to access certain information published by police partner agencies. Agencies can quickly and efficiently access information on specific occurrences. The third component consists of the Public Safety Portal, a web-based query tool that allows public safety partners to access limited police occurrences in accordance with their respective legislated mandate and legal authority. This Sub-sub-program is necessary because it is the only national fully-integrated and secure law enforcement and public safety communication tool.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
CPIC provides investigational data to law enforcement agencies and public safety partners Number of CPIC queries 224 million 248 million
Number of PIP queries 12.5 million 13.8 million
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CPIC and the RCMP's Chief Information Officer (CIO)Sector continue to evaluate the technical infrastructure of its systems to safeguard its capacity to deliver critical law enforcement information. In 2013-14, the number of queries to CPIC and PIP exceeded set targets, demonstrating the continued usefulness of these systems in sharing critical law enforcement information.

During the reporting cycle, CPIC developed and implemented a new risk-based quality assurance review process to replace formal audits. This automated process reviews and validates all records from the 2,300 CPIC data entry and access points to ensure the data uploaded to CPIC is timely, accurate and secure. With assistance and support from CPIC, the process will help partner agencies identify invalid data and determine the appropriate course of action to rectify inaccuracies.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.7: Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC)
Description

This Sub-sub-program is comprised of three national programs: the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC); International Operations; and the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR). The Centre leverages relationships with government and policing partners to respond to threats of child sexual exploitation and ultimately reduce the vulnerability of children to the threat of Internet-facilitated sexual exploitation, through identifying victims, investigating and assisting in the prosecution of sexual offenders, and strengthening the capacity of partners to respond to threats. The NCMPUR provides specialized support to law enforcement, medical examiners and chief coroners regarding missing persons and unidentified remains investigations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Assistance and investigational support is provided to local, municipal, regional, national and international policing partners Percentage of respondents who answer that they are satisfied with the assistance or investigational support provided by CPCMEC 80% N/A Footnote 52
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the NCECC received over 9,000 requests, complaints and/or reports for assistance, which represented a 50% increase since 2011. Due to the impact on existing resources, the NCECC initiated several procedural changes to improve workflow and efficiency: the process for international investigational packages was streamlined; an electronic filing system was implemented; and investigations were prioritized. The NCECC sent out 996 investigational packages, which were provided in cases of online child sexual exploitation to the police agency of jurisdiction. Important feedback was received on these packages, which has helped to tailor investigational practices and improve effectiveness.

In addition to these endeavours, CPCMEC modified and improved several technological systems. The Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS) transitioned to a paid-service application after the Microsoft service was discontinued in 2012. An agreement was signed with the United States National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children to automate data entry into CETS. Upon deployment of CETS version 2.5, investigators will have the ability to query the US Child Protection System for data de-confliction and to identify linkages.

The Sub-sub-program continued to work with the RCMP's Chief Information Officer (CIO) Sector to develop the National Missing Children/Persons and Unidentified Remains database. Once completed, trained specialists will provide Canadian police, medical examiners and chief coroners with more comprehensive and multi-jurisdictional information.

Lastly, CPCMEC partnered with Facebook Security and the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit to deploy a new image recognition technology known as PhotoDNA. With this new technology, Facebook can quickly scan hundreds of millions of images for cases of suspected child abuse. The images are blocked, and the offending users are identified and reported to local law enforcement. Such open source data has proven successful in a number of cases. For example, the NCECC received a report of online child exploitation, and used Facebook and geographic searches to identify the victim and offender. In collaboration with the British Columbia Integrated Child Exploitation unit, the suspect was located and arrested, and seven different charges have since been laid.

Sub-program 1.2.2: Canadian Firearms Program
Description

This Sub-program enhances public safety by providing police and other law enforcement organizations with operational and technical support vital to the prevention and investigation of firearms crime, both in Canada and internationally. Its goal is to reduce firearms-related death and injury in Canadian communities by regulating and promoting responsible ownership, use and storage of all firearms in Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Direct support is provided to law enforcement for firearms investigations Number of requests for service from law enforcement responded to by the Canadian Firearms Program 3,000 7,452 Footnote 53
Firearms ownership information is available to frontline police Number of online queries to the Canadian Firearms Program database by frontline police 7 million 6,017,131
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) continued to reduce the risk of harm from firearms, administering the Firearms Act and its regulations, which govern the possession, transport, use and storage of firearms in Canada. In 2013-14, the CFP provided eligibility screening to over 1.9 million firearms clients, thereby promoting responsible firearm ownership. The Sub-program also delivered specialized operational and technical services to domestic and international law enforcement organizations, responding to all 7,452 requests for firearms services received by National Weapons Enforcement Support Teams.

Through CPIC, the CFP maintains an online platform for police to access firearms licence and registration information of restricted and prohibited firearms. This database assists frontline police in tracing ownership of firearms and can also help determine the presence of firearms at an address when police respond to a call for service. In 2013-14, the CFP had set a target of 7 million queries to the database; at the end of the fiscal year, it had been queried 6,017,131 times, an average of 16,000 a day. This result shows continued heavy demand, but somewhat lower due to legislative changes. In addition to this service provided to the law enforcement community, the CFP produced and delivered statistical reports on firearms in Canadian jurisdictions to assist in strategic and investigative decision making.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.2.1: Firearms Licensing and Registration
Description

This Sub-sub-program has a legislative mandate to administer the Firearms Act, related Regulations and provisions of the Criminal Code of Canada. It enhances public safety by screening all firearms possession licence applicants and continuously monitoring 1.8 million individuals and businesses. This reduces the risk that firearms are in the possession of persons who may pose a risk to public security.

The Sub-sub-program works collaboratively with law enforcement organizations, provincial Chief Firearms Officers (CFOs) and other public agencies. It governs the safe use and storage of firearms and maintains records of restricted and prohibited firearms. This Sub-sub-program also designs, and is responsible for, the delivery of Canadian Firearms Safety courses, and it advises the Commissioner and the Minister with respect to the Firearms Act and Regulations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Continuous eligibility screening of firearms clients promotes responsible firearms ownership Percentage of individuals with firearms whose licensing privileges have been revoked for public safety reasons reported to police by the Canadian Firearms Program for follow-up 100% 100%
Percentage of Firearms Interest Police matches between the Canadian Police Information Centre Incident Reports and individual firearms licence holders in the Canadian Firearms Information System that are being investigated or have been excluded by the Canadian Firearms Program as part of continuous eligibility screening of firearm owners 95% 95.2%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Firearms Licensing and Registration continued to screen new and existing licence holders to reduce the risk to public safety. The Sub-sub-program continued to generate Firearms Interest Police (FIP) reports for its CFOs whenever an individual licence holder was involved in a violent event or other offences specified in section 5 of the Firearms Act. Based on an assessment of an individual's risk to public safety, CFOs were authorized to refuse an application for or revoke an existing firearms licence. Of all FIPs received in 2013-14, 95.2% were investigated. Footnote 54

The number of firearms prohibition orders issued by courts also increased in 2013-14, possibly as a result of greater judicial and prosecutorial awareness of offences that require firearm prohibitions and licence revocations. Once these orders are issued, the Sub-sub program's CFOs revoke licences and associated registration certificates, refuse pending applications and provide instructions on firearms disposal. Throughout the reporting year, the CFP advised police of every individual deemed in possession of a firearm whose licensing privileges had been revoked for public safety reasons, so that law enforcement could take appropriate action.

In addition to these activities, the Sub-sub-program was also responsible for the provision of firearms safety training to over 100,000 clients. Several educational and outreach initiatives were carried out during the year, including the Northern Firearms Safety Strategy, which were intended to improve community safety and firearms licence compliance rates in Nunavut and other areas of northern Canada. The CFP worked with Territorial governments, policing partners and northern communities on key outreach activities and provided training to reduce the risk of harm from firearms through suicide, accidental discharge and misuse.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.2.2: Firearms Investigative and Enforcement Services
Description

This Sub-sub-program supports frontline law enforcement agencies with the investigation and prosecution of persons or organizations involved in the illegal movement and criminal use of firearms. This is done by assisting with gathering evidence; tracing illegal firearms; identifying trends, patterns and related factors of firearm movement; and maintaining the Firearms Reference Table. The RCMP provides training and advice to firearms prosecutors through its Crown Attorney program; works closely with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and INTERPOL; and is directly involved in providing assistance to international groups such as the United Nations (UN), Group of Eight (G8) and the Organization of American States (OAS) on operational issues related to illicit firearms.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Law enforcement partners will use Canadian Firearms Program services in fighting firearms-related crimes Number of firearm tracing requests received by the Canadian Firearms Program 2,000 2,211
Number of calls received by the Canadian Firearms Program via the police support line 3,000 3,092
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Sub-sub-program focused its activities throughout the year on supporting Canadian and international law enforcement efforts to fight firearms crime. Domestically, the CFP completed 2,211 firearms tracing requests and 7,452 requests for service for firearms investigations, exceeding set performance targets. The CFP maintained a police support line to directly assist law enforcement, responding to 3,092 requests for service. Additionally, geographical firearms profiles were produced and distributed to 32 police services to assist investigative efforts. The Firearms Reference Table (FRT), with information on firearm makes and models, was maintained throughout the year. This assisted law enforcement with tracing, record keeping and accurate firearms identification.

Internationally, the FRT was used as the basis for INTERPOL's iFRT, an interactive online tool for authorized users to obtain or verify the details of a firearm. Representatives from the Sub-sub-program also participated in INTERPOL's Advisory Group for the Illicit Arms Records and Tracing Management System, an information technology system launched in 2013-14 to provide a centralized global system to report and query lost, stolen, trafficked and smuggled firearms. More information on the Canadian Firearm Program's efforts to combat illicit trafficking can be found in the Supplementary Table for the Horizontal Initiative "Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms". Footnote 55

Sub-program 1.2.3: Advanced Police Training
Description

This Sub-program provides training to the broader policing community including municipal, regional and provincial police services. This Sub-program is necessary as it increases the knowledge base and contributes to the increased efficiency of Canadian law enforcement agencies and government departments. Academic courses are provided on topics related to law enforcement as well as leadership and development curriculum for various levels of management.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Law enforcement capacity in Canada is supported by advanced training Percentage of clients who responded that they are satisfied with course performance, value for money, value to police learning, and post-course satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% N/A Footnote 56
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP is committed to modernizing and streamlining the recruiting process by implementing new testing and evaluation tools. The new recruiting model will focus on attracting the most qualified while decreasing an application's processing time. Such efforts will enhance the organization's ability to meet contractual obligations and could provide a positive impact on the costs associated with processing applicants. More specific initiatives include the development and implementation of information systems, electronic processing, intelligence-led recruiting and the improved use of social media and business intelligence.

In 2013-14, the Sub-program continued to expand the Leadership Continuum to include developmental opportunities for employees at all levels. The continuum is comprised of competency-based programs in the areas of field coaching for new constables and leadership development for employees, supervisors, managers and executives/officers. To complement formal RCMP programs, a contract for online courses offered by Cornell University is in place for supported employees to enhance their leadership development.

Moreover, the pilot phase of the new Executive Officer Development Program concluded in December 2013 and additional sessions of this program are anticipated in future reporting years.

The Sub-program was also responsible for the implementation of the new Performance Management Program for all public servants. The Treasury Board program was designed to monitor and assess core competencies, mutually agreeable work objectives, and learning and development plans for public servants. The directive also set in place talent management plans for employees who exceed expectations, as well as action plans for those requiring assistance in improving performance. In preparation for this directive, the RCMP delivered multiple information sessions to managers, supervisors and employees and created a general web and telephone portal for employees seeking further information. Over 98% of RCMP employees supervising public servants completed the mandatory course on the new performance management regime. Performance plans will cover the 2014-15 fiscal year and TBS will report on overall compliance with the directive in the fall of 2014.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.3.1: Canadian Police College
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides training to the Canadian law enforcement community through various venues including the two campuses of the Canadian Police College (Ottawa, ON and Chilliwack, BC) and onsite at other agencies, both national and international. This Sub-sub-program is necessary as some of this training is provided as a result of the 1966 Federal-Provincial Conference on Organized Crime, under the auspices of National Police Services (a suite of services to the broader policing community including municipal and provincial police services, federal departments such as CBSA and Citizenship and Immigration Canada, as well as foreign police organizations including INTERPOL and the Federal Bureau of Investigation). Courses offered include advanced and specialized police sciences (e.g., forensic identification, technological crime, explosives) and leadership training.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Advanced and specialized training is available to the law enforcement community Percentage of Canadian Police College clients who responded that they are satisfied with the value for money, value to police learning, and post-course satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% 93%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Police College (CPC) developed, designed and delivered executive and management courses, as well as advanced and specialized education to more than 3,600 law enforcement personnel throughout the year. The CPC also maintained a dedicated program to support advanced and specialized leadership training for Aboriginal Policing.

In 2013-14, the most frequently requested courses were those offered by the CPC's Technological Crime Learning Institute and the Forensic Identification Training program. The College increased the scope of its client base and provided training to other government departments and agencies including the Canada Revenue Agency, DFO and DND.

In addition to classroom sessions, CPC instructors provided training to international partners from Italy, Singapore and Hong Kong. Training for Latin American police officials on digital technology was conducted in partnership with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) in support of the Government of Canada's objective to combat transnational organized crime.

The CPC undertook a review of its fiscal structure, which resulted in the implementation of changes in course delivery and adjunct services. This included a reduction in certain library services. The CPC has also worked with other learning institutions to find program efficiencies and broaden access to the College and its curriculum. These changes were made to ensure that Canada's policing community continue to have access to affordable and cost-effective learning opportunities.

The CPC also made important strides in its pursuit of academic research. A discussion paper series was launched, bringing together internal and external subject matter experts, senior police officers and academics on collaborative research projects to promote dialogue on topics of law enforcement interest. Footnote 57 The CPC has also sought to increase its value by establishing relationships with academic institutions such as Laurentian University.

Sub-sub-program 1.2.3.2: National Law Enforcement Training
Description

This Sub-sub-program provides training to provincial and federal ministries and law enforcement agencies to assist in the fight against national and criminal activity. It also helps to develop partnerships across agencies to further learning and the sharing of best practices. Sub-sub-program costs cover course preparation, delivery and associated travel costs which are shared between the RCMP and the requesting domestic agency.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Operational training is provided to law enforcement Percentage of National Law Enforcement Training clients who responded that they are satisfied with course performance, value for money, value to police learning, and post-course satisfaction, calculated through the Client Satisfaction Index 80% N/A Footnote 58
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

National Law Enforcement Training (NLET) delivered recertification training to more than 1,100 RCMP members from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and covered topics ranging from police tactical skills to firearms, emergency medical response and health and wellness. In 2013-14, NLET's instructional methodology and course content for tactical training was reviewed to explore the possible integration of computerized simulator training and assessment strategies. The inclusion of simulator training has the potential to reduce the number of instructional resources required at Depot Division (the RCMP training academy) and may also improve scheduling pressures for existing facilities.

NLET also established partnerships with other federal government clients to provide training tailored to meet their respective legislative mandates and job-related functions. Under these agreements, training was provided to 132 new officers with Correctional Services Canada, Parks Canada and DFO. Additionally, members from the Canadian Coast Guard attended the Law Enforcement Familiarization Course, and Alberta Occupational Health and Safety attended the Law Enforcement Investigators Course to enhance their overall service delivery.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective support of international operations"

Partners: 80%

Stakeholders: 80%

N/A Footnote 59
Number of partnerships and Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that promote the culture and heritage of the RCMP 5 N/A Footnote 60

Program 2.1: International Policing Operations

Description

This Program furthers Canada's global peace and security agenda through cooperation and support of the international law enforcement community, thereby ensuring that both Canadians and the global community are safer. It addresses the transnational scope of crime and terrorism by building relationships with international policing partners, participating in the INTERPOL global information sharing network and conducting extra-territorial criminal investigations.

Additionally, the RCMP actively participates in multiple missions abroad in a peacekeeping role by providing support to nations at risk in building their law enforcement capacity. Through this international cooperation and collaboration, this Program contributes directly to a more secure world and Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
56,012,070 56,641,845 58,841,573 53,068,140 (3,573,705)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs]) Footnote 61
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
350 232 (118)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
International policing partners are engaged to achieve the RCMP's law enforcement and security objectives Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP engages international policing partners to achieve its law enforcement and security objectives" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 62
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to devote considerable energy to the implementation of Canadian foreign policy on security. The International Policing Operations Program met its commitments and responsibilities by participating in international operations, contributing to the development of national and foreign policies, and facilitating cross-border police operations.

Under the Canadian Police Arrangement, the RCMP managed the deployment of more than 100 police officers to peace operations in Haiti and the West Bank, as well as senior police advisors to Brindisi, Italy and New York City. Deployments to South Sudan, Côte d'Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Afghanistan ended during the reporting year. The year 2014 represented the 25th anniversary of Canadian police contribution to international peace operations- a legacy that has helped to create a safer and more stable global environment.

The RCMP also continued to enhance its policy and operational efforts through the establishment of International Geographic Tables. These tables were designed to facilitate and improve the coordination of RCMP resources and services in five areas: Canada-United States; Latin America and the Caribbean; Europe; the Middle East and Africa; and Asia. These tables serve as a focal point for regional expertise, where information is shared and leveraged to set priorities and inform decisions. Furthermore, they have allowed the Program to identify and discuss regional and international events and trends to determine their impact on RCMP operations, interests and strategies. Lastly, this initiative has facilitated the alignment of international activities with domestic operations, intelligence and priorities.

Sub-program 2.1.1: International Stability and Development
Description

This Sub-program promotes global stability and peace by providing support for peace operations and capacity building work in high risk communities in the developing world and elsewhere which are in need of international assistance. This includes delivering training sessions, sharing expertise and best practices, and providing resources for peace support operations. Additionally, by supporting these countries, the program contributes to global stability and peace thus benefitting Canadians.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Nations at risk are supported Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP effectively assesses and provides support/deployments to nations at risk" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 63
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the RCMP was presented with an opportunity to make a contribution to building lasting peace and stability in the Philippines. A senior RCMP officer was selected to chair the Independent Commission on Policing for the Bangasmoro region, a deployment that was funded by DFATD. The government of the Philippines was working to establish a multi-level policing model within a community policing approach and sought the RCMP's experience in multi-jurisdictional policing. The officer played an integral role in the development of a new police service framework and presented a report with 108 recommendations on building a unified police force for Bangasmoro. On March 27, 2014, the government of the Philippines and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front signed a peace agreement, which concluded the Mindanao peace process.

Deployments to promote stability and police development in the West Bank continued during the fiscal year. Three Canadian police officers were deployed to the European Union Police Coordinating Office for Palestinian Police Support to help establish sustainable and effective law and order within the West Bank to counter terrorism and enhance security. Canadian police officers also contributed to mission priorities and goals by providing support, guidance and training programs to the Palestinian Civil Police.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.1.1: International Peace Operations
Description

This Sub-sub-program manages the deployment of Canadian police personnel to international peace operations and international criminal courts and commissions to respond to or prevent international conflicts and crises, as well as to support the rule of law. The deployments are determined based on the Canadian Police Arrangement, a governance framework that exists between DFATD, PS and the RCMP.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian police officers are deployed abroad for peace support operations Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective support to international peace operations" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 64
Percentage of Canadian police officers deployed in International Peace Operations missions based on the affordability model Minimum of 90% 77% Footnote 65
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian mission in Afghanistan, one of the most significant RCMP international peace operations, came to an end in March 2014. Since 2003, 314 Canadian police officers from 22 police services helped Afghans build a more professional and responsive police force. Canadian police had a strong hand in the development of the Afghan National Police (ANP), helping them to develop fundamental infrastructure as well as key policing and administrative skills. Senior Canadian police officers held key strategic positions that helped shape and drive the progress of the ANP. Despite working in an unpredictable and restrictive environment, Canadian police officers successfully fulfilled their training commitments, positively influencing the progress of police training in Afghanistan.

Through the Canadian Police Arrangement, Canadian civilian police officers were also deployed to the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).

These officers helped enhance the capacity and skills of the Haitian National Police (HNP) to progressively increase their responsibility for the security of the country. The average number of Canadian police officers deployed to MINUSTAH in 2013-14 was 86, with several Canadians holding influential positions in the Mission including the Deputy Police Commissioner for HNP Development, the Chief Community Policing Unit, and the Chief of Administrative Police. Most Canadian police officers were involved in training or mentoring HNP officers in a variety of police functions. Under a Canadian-led initiative, the HNP began applying community policing approaches, such as a bicycle patrol program, to build relationships and trust with residents while patrolling areas in and around Port-au-Prince. HNP officers, trained by Canadian/UN officers, have improved street safety by conducting structured patrols under the community policing initiative.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.1.2: International Policing Assistance and Capacity Building
Description

This Sub-sub-program contributes to global stability by developing and promoting tools, and by providing training, advice, mentoring and subject matter expertise to developing countries and others, to help strengthen their law enforcement institutions over the long term.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
International law enforcement capacity is supported Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective support to law enforcement capacity abroad" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 66
Percentage of capacity building requests actioned which are fully funded and recognized as Government of Canada priorities Minimum of 90% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP dedicated resources throughout the fiscal year to provide expertise and training for several international initiatives. In Morocco, Mali, Niger and Mauritania, capacity building projects were provided based on a "train-the-trainer" concept. Following the interviewing techniques training sessions delivered in Morocco, the regional liaison officer reported that the Moroccan government decided to amend its legislation to meet Canadian standards acquired from the RCMP policing model.

In collaboration with DFATD, PS and DND, the RCMP participated in a Needs Assessment Mission to East Africa, under the Counterterrorism Capacity Building Program to identify the most pertinent initiatives for the region. Following RCMP recommendations, two project proposals were forwarded in the areas of tactical intelligence (Kenya and Tanzania) and drug investigation (Tanzania). These initiatives focused on areas of international law enforcement that have a direct impact on the safety and security of Canadians and Canadian interests.

Sub-program 2.1.2: International Cooperation
Description

This Sub-program advances Canadian law enforcement interests and values abroad, and promotes partnerships within the international law enforcement community. It also sustains multilateral relationships to bolster the effectiveness of policing operations, both domestically and globally. Examples include: the RCMP Liaison Officer program, which deploys members to strategic foreign locations in support of the RCMP's mandate; INTERPOL Ottawa; and International Peace Operations, which deploys Canadian police personnel to failed and fragile states in support of capacity building efforts.

This Sub-program also supports the development of RCMP engagement strategies to identify best practices, challenges and opportunities with the goal of improving cooperation with key partners.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian law enforcement interests and values abroad are advanced Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective international support to the Canadian law enforcement community" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 67
Partnerships within the international law enforcement community are promoted Number of new MOUs or Letters of Intent that are signed between the RCMP and international law enforcement organizations to assist Canadian law enforcement partners 1 0 Footnote 68
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP continued to enhance cooperation between Canadian and foreign law enforcement agencies to assist in the fight against global criminal activity and to ensure the safety and security of Canadians at home. In 2013-14, the Sub-program played a significant role in INTERPOL's Operation Lionfish, a maritime anti-smuggling operation, bringing together national, regional and international law enforcement to stem the flow of drugs and weapons from Central America and the Caribbean to other countries, including Canada.

The operation led to the arrest of 142 individuals and the seizure of more than $170,000 USD in cash; nearly 30 tons of cocaine, heroin and marihuana (with an estimated street value of $822 million USD); eight tons of precursor drugs; 42 illegal guns; and 15 vessels.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.1: Operations Support Abroad
Description

Through the Liaison Officer (LO) network, this Sub-sub-program provides operational support and assistance to Canadian law enforcement agencies in the detection, prevention and investigation of offences to Canadian federal laws.

Additionally, it liaises with foreign police agencies and related institutions to exchange criminal information in order to identify trends and threats to the safety of Canadian homes and communities.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Operational support and assistance to Canadian law enforcement agencies is facilitated Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides timely response to international requests" Baseline to be established N/A Footnote 69
Liaison Officers are deployed to assist law enforcement partners Number of new temporary deployment(s) or permanent redeployment(s) to respond to operational priorities 1 8 Footnote 70
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the International Liaison and Coordination Centre added five new LO posts, for a total of 42 individuals deployed to strategic locations around the world. In addition to these positions, 10 criminal intelligence analysts were deployed to address emerging operational and intelligence pressures. This project was initiated to increase the visibility of the RCMP and expand its influence overseas to help identify potential threats that could affect Canada in the future.

Through the management of temporary liaison officers, the RCMP successfully disrupted a particular group's efforts to organize a transnational human smuggling and/or trafficking venture. As such, no known vessels of interest containing potential irregular immigrants destined for Canada were found to have departed from regions with temporary LOs.

Sub-sub-program: 2.1.2.2 International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)
Description

This Sub-sub-program shares information and seeks assistance in criminal investigations between Canada and INTERPOL's member countries in their respective jurisdictions. INTERPOL Ottawa, located at RCMP National Headquarters, is necessary as it serves as the principal link between Canadian and international law enforcement communities by coordinating international requests for assistance with the appropriate Canadian law enforcement agencies.

It also provides a unique range of essential services such as: providing access to criminal databases (criminal records, passports, etc.); advancing investigative INTERPOL tools to locate fugitives and missing persons; coordinating the possible deportation or extradition of International or Canadian fugitives - while optimizing the effort to prevent and combat transnational crime.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian involvement in international law enforcement actions is coordinated Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is one of their first considerations when seeking international assistance" 80% N/A Footnote 71
Criminal information is shared amongst INTERPOL's member countries Number of queries and hits to the INTERPOL/CPIC interface

Queries: 200,000

Hits: 750

Queries: 230,190

Hits: 372 Footnote 72

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Sub-sub-program met its performance goals by participating in various capacity building and training activities. In 2013-14, members attended the INTERPOL Capacity Building Programs on Organized Crime for the Americas and Counterterrorism for Asia and Africa, as well as other capacity building initiatives in Belize, the Philippines, Kenya, China and Cuba. The RCMP also hosted a criminal intelligence workshop on drug trafficking and organized crime in the Americas (Central America, the Caribbean and neighbouring countries) and Southeast Asian countries.

RCMP members attending these sessions did so as instructors or to lend subject-matter expertise. INTERPOL's General Secretariat indicated that training provided by Canada's National Central Bureau provided excellent value and benefit, and underscored the clear need to continue to provide capacity building training to countries in the developing world and/or countries actively seeking to improve their policing functions. Through these training initiatives, a strong link was forged between Canadian law enforcement and recipient countries, which has benefitted operations and investigations.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.3: International Law Enforcement Training
Description

Working diligently with RCMP policy centres, Government of Canada agencies and international partners, this Sub-sub-program reduces international organized crime by providing strategic training, thus bridging international operational gaps and strengthening local law enforcement.

By providing these necessary tools to suppress criminal activity, the RCMP is consequently strengthening global security and making communities safer. Funding for this Sub-sub-program goes towards training equipment, travel expenses and training aids necessary to complete the required services. Costs are shared between the RCMP and DFATD through various memoranda of understanding.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Training is provided to international law enforcement agencies and departments Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP provides effective support to international operations" 90% N/A Footnote 73
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The RCMP dedicated resources throughout the fiscal year to provide expertise and training for several international initiatives. Training programs were provided on a variety of subjects such as tactical intelligence analysis and community policing, as well as investigational techniques related to financial crimes, major crimes, behavioural observation, surveillance and ship boarding. These programs enhanced the skills and knowledge of recipient police authorities in countries including Costa Rica, Colombia, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Guyana, Jamaica, Guinea, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia and India.

The RCMP also presented an interdiction program, named JETWAY, which focused on ports of entry such as airports and bus and train stations. This training was delivered in Costa Rica, where authorities later reported an increase in successful investigations related to illegal immigration and international narcotics traffic. In December 2013, JETWAY was offered to Indian law enforcement and intelligence agencies to address the security of major critical infrastructure facilities. Indian officials informed the RCMP that, due to the knowledge acquired through the JETWAY program, customs officers were able to detect a criminal in transit with narcotics destined for international distribution. Such feedback confirmed the value of capacity building approaches to assist international law enforcement in preventing criminal activity.

Sub-sub-program 2.1.2.4: International Visits and Protocol
Description

This Sub-sub-program is responsible for the approval, coordination and post-travel evaluation of RCMP employee attendance at international conferences, seminars and workshops. It is also responsible for providing assistance in obtaining special passports and visas for official Government of Canada travel by RCMP employees.

Additionally, it coordinates official visits by international law enforcement to the RCMP and provides guidance to employees hosting international visitors and delegations.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
International travel of RCMP employees is facilitated and managed Percentage of travelers complying with policy requirements regarding traveler safety Baseline to be established 98%
Percentage of international administrative travel requests that are assessed and approved according to International Travel and Visitors Branch policy 95% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

International Travel and Protocol played a critical role in supporting the RCMP's LO network and, more generally, the RCMP's ability to build and maintain relationships with foreign law enforcement partners. In 2013-14, the Sub-sub-program planned, coordinated and implemented 48 official visits involving 356 foreign law enforcement and security officials. In addition, three conferences were organized for international visitors. These outreach endeavours allowed the RCMP to exchange best practices and discuss operational interests and threats with foreign partners and stakeholders.

Program 2.2: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

Description

In order to protect the RCMP's internationally recognized image, reputation and rich heritage, this Program works to promote the positive image of the RCMP while building relationships with domestic and international law enforcement, government and community partners.

The Program provides advice and analysis to internal and external clients - including federal, provincial and municipal partners, academic institutions, Royal Household representatives, and non-government organizations - regarding appropriate ceremonial features of special events and occurrences (e.g., the Olympics, Expos, Summits and at funerals for police officers). Through the activities of this Program, the RCMP contributes to Canada's vibrant culture and heritage.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
11,052,423 11,367,863 12,779,035 13,359,752 1,991,889
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
100 97 (3)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "the RCMP is a recognized symbol of Canada" 80% N/A Footnote 74
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program is a vital component of law enforcement and community policing. Given that the RCMP continues to be a nationally and internationally recognized symbol of Canada, the Program offers excellent opportunities to reach out to strategic partners and stakeholders.

In 2013-14, resources for the Musical Ride were used to support FTEs, tour operations and the RCMP's breeding farm. RCMP Regular Members who join the Musical Ride do so for a three-year period, which includes a six-month training program. As members must then be transferred back to divisions, the Program worked with Human Resources throughout the year to streamline and expedite the process. It is anticipated that the application of updated policies and procedures in the staffing of the Musical Ride will provide significant savings in the next two fiscal years.

Partnerships and Heritage experienced a significant transition during the reporting year as it responded to competing requests with finite resources. In consultation with stakeholders, the Program has begun developing service standards for its policy centres including Sponsorship, Charities and the Historical Section. These standards will ensure the Program is able to protect and promote the RCMP image, build relationships, encourage innovation and share the RCMP legacy.

Sub-program 2.2.1: Musical Ride
Description

This Sub-program promotes the heritage and traditions of both the RCMP and Canada to Canadians and the international community. It also helps to raise money for local charities by organizing and performing local shows of the Musical Ride. The Musical Ride's Canadian Tour travels to approximately 45 to 55 Canadian communities in two different provinces every year over a period of 85 to 100 days. It will also perform at international venues upon request using a cost-recovery model. Destinations for the Musical Ride's tour are chosen from among requests from communities, and the final schedule is drafted to align the tour with the priorities of divisional Commanding Officers, other government departments or Members of Parliament.

Typically, these priorities support public outreach programs or RCMP recruiting initiatives in contract policing communities. In addition to the tour, the Musical Ride also provides riders in Red Serge for ceremonial events and parades hosted by the RCMP or by other government partners. Typical events can include such things as memorial services or visits by foreign dignitaries. Costs for this Sub-program cover the equitation training of RCMP members, the rearing, training and supporting of horses required for the program, and all of the logistical tasks associated with the Musical Ride's tour and performances.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The Musical Ride supports Canadian communities Percentage of respondents who strongly agree or agree with the statement "We were satisfied in hosting the Musical Ride" 100% 91.8%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In support of the RCMP, communities and partners, the Musical Ride tours Canada four to six months of the year, assisting charities and non-profit groups with key fundraising efforts. In 2013-14, the Musical Ride visited Northern Ontario and British Columbia, offering 61 performances at 35 separate venues. Throughout the tour, the Musical Ride helped local organizers raise over $735,000 for local charitable endeavours.

Outside of its annual tour, the Musical Ride participated in a benefit performance in High River, Alberta. The High River Agricultural Society took on all responsibilities associated with the event and members of the Musical Ride volunteered their time. Admission to the show was free and cash and food donations were accepted and provided to the High River community.

The Musical Ride Sub-program also offered two Mounted Police Seminars to participants from international and Canadian law enforcement agencies. Members from American, Israeli and Trinidad and Tobago police agencies participated in the seminars, with topics ranging from grooming to equitation including an introduction to horse jumping. The seminars have proven to be an excellent opportunity for liaison work amongst international law enforcement agencies and have increased the visibility and network of the Musical Ride.

In addition to these activities, the Sub-program worked with DND and the Toronto Metro Police Department with the "Soldier On Program". Twelve participants were welcomed to the Musical Ride for a week, where they learned about basic equitation skills and participated in several therapeutic riding outings. The program proved to be a tremendous success in introducing injured and ill soldiers and police officers to basic equitation. The RCMP, which contributed facilities and instructors to the program, will continue to support the work of the "Soldier On Program".

Sub-program 2.2.2: Partnerships and Heritage
Description

This Sub-program promotes and protects the RCMP's image. It ensures the representation of the RCMP and Canada at major events by building and leveraging strategic partnerships with Other Government Departments and non-profit and private sector organizations. It regulates the use of the RCMP's image, trademarks and technology by the general public and industry by managing sponsorships and licensing agreements. It documents and preserves the RCMP's heritage and it answers related enquires from the general public.

Lastly, it coordinates the RCMP's participation in both public and departmental ceremonial or special events such as the Sunset Ceremonies, funerals, memorial services or visits by members of the Monarchy. This Sub-program also manages the RCMP's representation in both domestic and international special events by reviewing and authorizing requests for members in Red Serge. The costs for this Sub-program cover all administrative tasks and logistical support/resources to carry out these responsibilities, and also cover the Sunset Ceremonies and legal and administrative fees related to the management of intellectual property.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The image of the RCMP is promoted and protected as a symbol of Canada Number of licence agreements and MOUs for the authorized use of the RCMP image 104 10 Footnote 75
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Partnerships and Heritage Sub-program engaged domestic and international partners on a variety of public projects throughout the year, including Veterans Affairs Canada, DFATD and the Canadian Tourism Commission. Through the International and Domestic Ceremonial and Protocol unit, the Sub-program responded to over 120 requests to participate in events including the 50th Anniversary of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award, the Canada Day Challenge and commemorative occasions marking the Year of the Korean War Veteran.

The Sub-program's Intellectual Property Office continued to assist clients with the use and application of RCMP images and innovations in accordance with RCMP policy, the Public Servants Inventions Act, the Trademark Act, the Financial Administration Act and Treasury Board policy. In 2013-14, 10 new licence agreements were signed and seven projects were initiated related to the use of protected images and marks of the RCMP.

The RCMP also worked with the Government of Canada on preparations for the "Road to 2017", celebrating Canada's 150th anniversary. Three main themes were selected for the anniversary: Nation Building and the March West; commemoration and remembrance of those lost in the First and Second World War; and an emphasis on national symbols and Canadian institutions. In support of these themes, the RCMP partnered with museums in the NCR to share artifacts and research about the Force's history.

Moreover, in partnership with Public Works and Government Services Canada, the Library of Parliament and the RCMP Foundation, the RCMP created interpretative displays about its role and history in Canada, which were featured at the visitor centre on Parliament Hill. In addition to these projects, the RCMP's historical section continued to offer research assistance to external and internal clients. Almost 600 requests were answered throughout the year in subjects ranging from genealogical research to more in-depth studies on the role of the RCMP and specialized units, such as marine and air services.

Strategic Outcome 3: Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death Percentage of payments processed according to contractual and policy authorities and the prescribed financial control framework 100% 100%

Program 3.1: Statutory Payments

Description

This Program ensures that RCMP employees and their families are provided income security in the event of disability or death. It ensures that an appropriate level of support is afforded to those who are affected by circumstances beyond their control and as a result of their employment with the RCMP.

The activities within this Program are regulated by statutory payments, for example the RCMP Pension Continuation Act payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
142,186,657 148,486,740 148,601,130 147,142,744 (1,343,996)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
N/A N/A N/A
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Claims and inquiries are answered within established service standards Percentage of claims and enquiries processed in accordance with established service standards 100% 100%
Sub-program 3.1.1: Members Injured on Duty - Compensation
Description

This Sub-program provides both financial and health care assistance to members of the RCMP who suffer a permanent work-related illness or injury that causes loss in quality of life. Because this support is available, members of the Force are motivated to achieve excellent results in providing Canadians with a safe and secure Canada.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Compensation benefits are provided to RCMP members and their families Percentage of compensation benefits claims processed within established service standards 100% 100%
Sub-program 3.1.2: Survivor Income Plan
Description

This Sub-program was designed to meet the needs of the survivors of members who have sacrificed their lives in the line of duty.

The Sub-program's goal is to compensate a family for the income lost with the death of the member such that their net income remains at the same level.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Income protection is provided for families of members who have suffered a duty-related death Percentage of benefits claims processed within established service standards 100% 100%
Sub-program 3.1.3: RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments
Description

This Sub-program administers pension payments for Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Constables who enrolled in the RCMP Pension Continuation Act (PCA) program prior to March 1, 1949 and did not opt into its successor pension program, the RCMP Superannuation Act.

The PCA is a defined benefit program that provides a lifetime benefit for RCMP members and their survivors. The program does not currently have any contributors and once payments conclude for current recipients, it is expected that the PCA will be abandoned.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Pension benefits are provided for retired members of the RCMP and their survivors Percentage of pension benefits administered within established service standards 100% 100%

Program 4.1: Internal Services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources
2013-14
Main Estimates
($dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
($dollars)
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual Spending (Authorities used)
($dollars)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
($dollars)
668,283,022 691,696,623 736,074,324 676,679,488 (15,017,135)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs]) Footnote 76
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,467 5,146 679
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities, the RCMP committed to strengthening accountability through the effective management of communications, corporate and financial services, and human resources. Communications Focus 2017 was adopted to improve the alignment of communication efforts in support of strategic, operational and corporate services priorities. These priorities included the national impaired driving enforcement strategy, major national security operations, Aboriginal policing, youth-oriented initiatives, fraud prevention, missing persons awareness campaigns and child exploitation investigations. Efforts have also focused on empowering managers, supervisors and employees to communicate effectively in their roles, with training being provided on effective internal and change communication using the RCMP Internal Communication Toolkit.

The RCMP continued to implement its Investment Plan (Assets and Acquired Services), which was approved by Treasury Board in March 2012 for a three-year period along with its Class 3 - Evolutionary, Organization Project Management Capacity Assessment. Fiscal year 2013-14 represented year two of the initial five-year administration of the Provincial Police Services Agreement. The RCMP delivered the High Level, AB detachment at a cost of $8.6 million (of which $2.5 million was expended in 2013-14) and eight new living quarters in locations as diverse as Faro, YK, Masset, BC and North West River, NL, as well as numerous housing betterment projects totalling $10.8 million. During this same period, the RCMP had four new detachments under construction in Gypsumville, MB, Manning, AB, Grand Cache, AB, 100 Mile House, BC, expending $8.3 million. An additional $4.5 million was expended on transportable cells and land acquisitions for major detachment projects. Seven detachments projects were in the planning phase in NS, NB, MB, SK, MB, NT and BC at a cost of $1.2 million. These expenses were in addition to the $27.9 million the RCMP spent on minor capital upgrading to its detachment inventory. Looking forward, the RCMP will be completing the construction of the aforementioned detachments under construction and in the planning phase, and establishing, replacing or renovating 65 living quarters ensuring its frontline personnel have appropriate accommodations.

In managing human resources, the RCMP established three distinct priorities. First, to strengthen professional integrity, the RCMP's Office of Professional Integrity (OPI) implemented several initiatives throughout the fiscal year. The Professional Ethics Strategic Plan was launched in July 2013 to meet the objective of "Strong Ethics, Strong Organization", supported by three pillars: ethical leadership; governance; and culture. Initiatives have been developed at all levels of the organization including a new Commander or Commissioner Commendation for exemplary or exceptional professionalism and ethics/integrity.

The OPI advanced several reforms under the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act. New procedures, policies and processes have been developed to address public complaints, employee conduct, harassment investigation and resolution, employment requirements, and grievances and appeals. This new legislation has meant the creation of a new code of conduct for Regular and Civilian Members of the RCMP.

The establishment and maintenance of employee fitness, health and well-being are paramount to the effectiveness and efficiency of the RCMP, and were identified as the second management priority. To support members who are ill or injured, the RCMP has implemented a national case management project designed to track and address cases of members who are off-duty sick (ODS) for more than two years. Since the project's inception, the concerted efforts to manage ODS cases and actively follow up with members has led to many positive outcomes. Out of 182 members on long-term ODS identified in April 2013, 53% of the cases were resolved one year later. Almost 38% of the cases that were resolved were as a result of members returning to work from leave. Building on the success of this project, the RCMP has made significant progress in the development of an enhanced Disability Management Program, which is scheduled to launch in 2015.

To achieve and maintain organizational wellness, the RCMP launched a Mental Health Strategy which had as its goals: the elimination of stigma associated with psychological health problems; the advancement of proactive steps which help employees maintain and improve their mental health; and the continuous improvement of psychological health and safety programs and services. A number of initiatives were planned and carried out in support of this strategy including: contracting with Health Canada to provide Employee Assistance Services in addition to a peer-to-peer system; the establishment of a national Informal Conflict Management Program; the creation of a policy on and awareness of violence in the workplace; the implementation of a mandatory online Respectful Workplace course; the development of a re-invigorated fitness and lifestyle program; and the provision of member access to Veterans Affairs Canada Occupational Stress Injury clinics.

The organization also made important progress under its third priority: to provide strong talent management. In November 2013, an automated talent management tool was launched for all Regular Member officers and executives and Civilian Member executives. During the reporting year, 94.6% of members used the talent management tool, which enabled more comprehensive discussion about employee potential and performance and its impact on succession planning in the RCMP. The use of this tool reflected the RCMP's commitment to leverage technology and become more efficient and effective in data capturing, retention and reporting.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2014
Financial Information 2013-14
Planned Results
($dollars)
2013-14
Actual
($dollars)
2012-13
Actual (restated)
($dollars)
Difference
(2013-14 Actual minus 2013-14 Planned)
($dollars)
Difference
(2013-14 Actual minus 2012-13 Actual)
($dollars)
Total Expenses 4,941,015,000 4,997,673,000 4,933,253,000 56,658,000 64,420,000
Total Revenues 1,856,795,000 1,834,752,000 1,762,787,000 (22,043,000) 71,965,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 3,084,220,000 3,162,921,000 3,170,466,000 78,701,000 (7,545,000)
Departmental net financial position 1,364,155,000 1,372,837,000 1,307,815,000 8,682,000 65,022,000
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2014
Financial Information 2013-14
($dollars)
2013-14
($dollars)
Difference
(2013-14 minus 2012-13)
($dollars)
Total net liabilities 14,192,505,000
14,165,025,000 27,480,000
Total net financial assets 14,124,961,000 14,032,096,000 92,865,000
Departmental net debt 67,544,000 132,929,000 (65,385,000)
Total non-financial assets 1,440,381,000 1,440,744,000 (363,000)
Departmental net financial position 1,372,837,000 1,307,815,000 65,022,000

Financial Statements

The charts below illustrate the distribution of each of the items in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position.

Expenses

The majority of the expenses (75.2%) are related to the costs of Police Operations, which contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Approximately 15.0% of the expenses are related to Internal Services, which supports the needs of programs and corporate obligations of the RCMP. Another 5.4% are related to activities that contribute to Canadian Law Enforcement Services while 3.0% is related to Statutory Payments. The other activities combined represent 1.4% of total expenses.

This table demonstrates data of the Distribution of Expenses as a percentage for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Text description follows.

[ text version ]

Revenues

RCMP's Policing Services generates 99.9% of the respendable amount of revenues. Policing Services contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

This table demonstrates data of the Distribution of Revenues as a percentage for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Text description follows.

[ text version ]

Liabilities

The RCMP's liabilities consist mainly of RCMP Pension Accounts (93.3%), accounts payable and accrued liabilities (3.0%), and vacation pay and compensatory leave (1.8%).

This table demonstrates data of the Liabilities by Type as a percentage for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Text description follows.

[ text version ]

Assets

Approximately 87.0% of the RCMP's total assets are comprised of amounts Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, the vast majority of which represents funds available to discharge Pension and severance-related liabilities.

The balance of assets is comprised of tangible capital assets (8.9%), net accounts receivable and advances (3.7%) and inventory (0.4%).

This table demonstrates data of the Assets by Type as a percentage for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Text description follows.

[ text version ]

Financial Statements

Detailed financial statements, including the Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility and Internal Control over Financial Reporting, can be found on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police website. Footnote 77

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the RCMP's website. Footnote 78

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs
  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Horizontal Initiatives
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
  • Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval
  • User Fees Reporting

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. Footnote 79

The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For inquiries about the RCMP Departmental Performance Report, please contact:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Strategic Policy and Planning Directorate
73 Leikin Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0R2
RPP_DPR-RPP_RMR@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
Full-time equivalent
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
Planned spending
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
Plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecturen
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
Sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
Target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Whole-of-Government Frameworkn
AMaps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.
Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
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