Preparatory Guide for the RCMP Entrance Exam (RPAB)

Table of Contents

Preparing for the RCMP Entrance Exam

A career in policing with the RCMP is challenging, exciting, and rewarding. It also comes with great responsibility and demands that applicants possess certain aptitudes and abilities to provide a strong foundation upon which to build a successful career.

The RCMP Entrance Exam is a general, mental ability test designed to determine an applicant's potential aptitude for police work. It is the first step of several that assist in selecting applicants who will be successful both in training and in a future as a police officer.

The exam has two parts – the Electronic RCMP Police Aptitude Test (e-RPAT) and the Six Factor Personality Questionnaire (SFPQ). Both parts are done on a computer over the internet using the Public Service Commission's On-Line Testing Facility. The tests are automatically scored and you will see your results at the end of the test. This preparatory guide is designed to familiarize you with what to expect when writing the exam.

This guide provides:

  • recommendations and suggestions for how you can best prepare for the e-RPAT;

  • several practice questions similar to those on the exam;

  • answers to the practice questions and a detailed explanation; and

  • a description of the SFPQ and recommendations on how best to approach it.

Please note: In some situations such as remote locations or if technical issues occur, the exam may be administered in written, non-computerized format. Preparing for the paper-and-pencil version of the exam is essentially the same.

The paper version of the RPAT (part 1) has some differences which are explained throughout this guide (see Note:). The computerized and paper versions of the SFPQ (part 2) are the same.

Exam Overview

Part 1: Electronic RCMP Police Aptitude Test (e-RPAT)

  • The e-RPAT measures six skills: composition (spelling, grammar, and vocabulary), comprehension, judgment, observation, logic, and computation.

    Note: The paper-and-pencil version also measures memory.

  • The e-RPAT is a semi-adaptive test, meaning the difficulty level of the questions in subsequent stages is based on answers in the previous. Candidates will be randomly given one of several versions of Stage 1 (each version has the same level of difficulty). The difficulty level of the next stage is based on the answers in Stage 1, and so on for each stage. Points for a correct answer are based on the level of difficulty of the question, with the highest points given for the most difficult questions. This approach significantly reduces the number of questions and the length of the exam compared with the paper-and-pencil version and research has proven it also provides a better assessment of the candidate's abilities.

  • The e-RPAT consists of 50 multiple-choice questions. The questions are divided into five stages, each with 10 questions from any one of the 6 skill areas.

    Note: The paper-and-pencil version consists of 114 multiple-choice questions and includes an additional stage on memory. It is not semi-adaptive.

  • Each stage of the e-RPAT is individually timed. A timer in the upper right corner of the computer screen will show the time allowed and the time remaining. You will have 15 minutes to complete each stage and 75 minutes in total to complete the entire exam. After 75 minutes the computer will automatically close your test.

    Note: The paper-and-pencil version has a time limit of four hours. The test administrator will explain the start and finish times and the time limits for each stage.

  • You can only choose one answer for each question.

  • Try to answer all of the questions. If you are unsure of an answer, it is to your advantage to guess. There is no penalty for an incorrect answer.

  • You may review your answers within each stage and make changes as long as the 15-minute time limit has not expired. Once a stage is completed and the time limit has expired, you may not go back to questions from the completed stage(s).

Part 2: Six Factor Personality Questionnaire (SFPQ)

  • The SFPQ measures conscientiousness. It indicates traits such as honesty, integrity and commitment.

  • The SFPQ has 108 statements and a time limit of 45 minutes. You indicate your level of agreement with each statement.

The Electronic RCMP Police Aptitude Test (e-RPAT)

Composition

The Composition questions will examine your ability to articulate, in a written format, complex thoughts in a clear and concise manner understandable to others. Specifically, it will examine your knowledge of grammar, spelling, and vocabulary. Some of the sources used to create this section include ITP Nelson Canadian Dictionary of the English Language: An Encyclopedic Reference (1997); Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1984); Shaw's (1993) Errors in English and Ways to Correct them; and Strunk Jr.& White's (1979) The Elements of Style. Using these references may be helpful in preparing.

Some activities that can help improve your English composition performance include:

  • Read, read, and then read some more;

  • Familiarize yourself with the use of dictionaries and thesauruses. When reading, identify any words that you don't know and look them up in a dictionary;

  • Use memory aids to help you remember correct spelling. For example, mnemonics such as "i before e except after c" can be very useful;

  • Learn at least one new word every day;

  • Practice writing a short passage and have a friend read it out loud to you. Afterwards, check your spelling;

  • Try to spot spelling or grammar errors online, in newspapers or books; and

  • Do crossword puzzles – you can find them online, in newspapers, magazines or puzzle books. Continue to challenge yourself by progressively completing more difficult puzzles.

Practice questions

  1. Both women have made previous complaints, none of which were followed through because of insufficient evidence or strong fear of retaliation by the suspect. The suspect is attempting to intimidate the women and is known for irrationale behaviour.
    Which word in the sentences above is misspelled?

    1. insufficient

    2. retaliation

    3. intimidate

    4. irrationale

  2. On the night of the accident, coeficient of friction testing was conducted using police transport on a cycloidal skid mark.
    Which word in the sentence above is misspelled?

    1. accident

    2. coeficient

    3. friction

    4. cycloidal

  3. Once she became a public figure, she had to give _____ her anonymity.
    Which word completes the sentence?

    1. about

    2. back

    3. in

    4. up

  4. My partner and _____ went to the home and _____ knocking on the door.
    Which words complete the sentence?

    1. I, began

    2. me, began

    3. me, begun

    4. I, begun

  5. Which of the following is the best definition of the word amendment?

    1. cancellation by making invalid or outdated

    2. identification by comparison and elimination

    3. improvement by revision or correction

    4. protection by establishing rules and laws

  6. Which of the following words can be defined as: "The process of deriving general principles from particular instances"?

    1. concoction

    2. deduction

    3. induction

    4. reduction

Comprehension

The Comprehension questions are designed to evaluate your ability to read and accurately interpret written material. You will be presented with some short passages and asked one question about each to determine if you correctly interpreted the content of the particular passage.

Some activities that can help improve your English comprehension performance include:

  • As with the composition exercises, read, read, and then read some more.

  • Make sure you are reading at a level expected to perform the job of police officer. Canadian Geographic, Saturday Night, and some of the longer articles in Maclean's have a similar reading level to that of the RCMP Entrance Exam. You can find these and similar ones online or at your local library; and

  • Ask a friend to read a challenging article or passage that you have also read. Discuss the content of the text to confirm your comprehension.

Practice questions

Questions 7 to 9 refer to the following passage:

Throughout its long history, China has seen the rise and fall of a large number of secret organizations. Originally, most of them had no criminal intent. They were simply brotherhoods based on shared political purposes and mutual assistance. However, some of them fell under the control of dishonest people. They then drifted into crime and ended up posing a threat to the social order. This was the case for two of the largest secret organizations of Chinese modern history, the Tsing and Hong organizations.

Many criminal organizations such as the Tsing and Hong and many others controlled brothels, opium dens, casinos and drug trafficking operations. They forced business owners to give them a percentage of their profit. They also committed more serious crimes such as abduction, the trade of women and children, and even assassinations. To achieve impunity from the law, they corrupted government and colonial officials. It was not uncommon for leaders of these organizations to occupy legitimate positions in companies or even in government agencies. They used these jobs as a front for their illegal activities. Each organization had its own system of laws and punishments. The internal law of the Hong organization had five possible punishments: capital punishment, corporal punishment, caning, degradation and banishment. A strict hierarchy existed and obedience to superiors was mandatory. New members, called apprentices, were placed under a master and were at his service. In the golden age of the Tsing and Hong organizations, a powerful leader could recruit thousands of apprentices.

Analyse de la criminalité en Chine, Zhang, X., Revue Internationale de Criminologie et de Police Technique, (1996), Vol. 3, pp. 321-329
  1. According to the previous passage, which one of the following statements is true?

    1. Chinese secret organizations have always threatened the social order.

    2. Financial assistance is encouraged in Chinese criminal organizations.

    3. Few criminal organizations are known in China; only two are known today.

    4. Some secret Chinese organizations have not turned to crime.

  2. According to the previous passage, which one of the following statements is true?

    1. Criminal organizations bribed government employees and senior officials to avoid facing consequences of their misdeeds.

    2. All leaders of these organizations had legitimate positions in businesses or in the government.

    3. The trade of women and children was the main activity of Chinese criminal organizations.

    4. Prostitution is one of the rare illegal businesses in which Chinese criminal organizations did not participate.

  3. Which one of the following statements is supported by the previous passage?

    1. In the Hong organization, only apprentices had to obey their superiors.

    2. In the Hong organization, a person's rank could not be lowered as a form of punishment.

    3. In the Hong organization, the penalty for disobedience was corporal punishment.

    4. In the Hong organization, the leader recruited many new members.

Judgment

Judgment questions will test your ability to use appropriate resources and strategies to achieve objectives. It provides an indication that you can demonstrate good judgment in reaching sound decisions and taking the appropriate course of action. The word judgment and the concept of common sense are essentially the same.

In responding to the questions, think about the possible consequences of taking/not taking each of the actions listed. Choose the option that you believe has the most positive set of consequences, or perhaps the least negative set of consequences.

Activities that can help improve your judgment performance include:

  • Take note of any policing situations that you may read about in the newspaper. Notice the actions taken, the rationale for these actions, and the public's response to the actions.

  • It is difficult to improve judgment or common sense. The key is to expand your horizon so that you may understand the consequences of a set of plausible actions. Once you have improved your ability to predict possible consequences, improvement in common sense will follow.

Practice questions

  1. You are a police officer in a small town. You are on patrol at 2:00 a.m. when you see a car leaving town and moving very fast. You turn on the lights and sirens of your police car and attempt to pull the car over. The car does not pull over and a brief high speed chase results. After a short distance, the driver loses control of the car and it skids into the ditch. Four men jump out of the car and run into the forest. Of the following which is the best initial course of action to take?

    1. Call for backup and immediately chase the suspects into the forest.

    2. Call for backup and request police dog(s). Upon their arrival, begin the chase of the suspects into the forest.

    3. Determine the registered owner of the car. The following day, go to the registered car owner's home and question him about the incident.

    4. Draw your gun and order the men to stop. If they do not comply, fire a warning shot into the air.

  2. You are a police officer in a large municipality. Your coworker and friend, Constable Grey, is in constant financial trouble as the result of loans that she obtained before joining the RCMP. Constable Grey is married and has recently taken on a second job to pay her bills. You have noticed that since she has had this second job, the quality of her work has gone down considerably. Of the following, which is the best initial step to take?

    1. Suggest to Constable Grey that she speak to a financial consultant.

    2. Lend Constable Grey some money.

    3. Speak to Constable Grey's spouse to identify possible solutions to her financial difficulties.

    4. Speak to Constable Grey and tell her about your concerns.

  3. At a meeting, your supervisor tells all the members on shift about a new RCMP policy. The policy states that police officers are to wear their hats at all times while on duty in the downtown area. The rationale for the policy is that the wearing of hats projects a professional policing image and allows the public to easily identify the person as a police officer. Later that evening, you and your partner receive a call that a young female was just sexually assaulted by two males who are both well-known to you. The two males are to be arrested. You believe that the two male suspects are at a fountain in the downtown area that is only approachable on foot. There is a music festival being held in the area that is attracting large crowds of people. You and your partner feel that, under these circumstances, it would be inappropriate to wear your hats; the suspects would likely see you approaching and may flee. Of the following, which is the best course of action to take?

    1. Call your supervisor, explain the situation, and request permission not to wear your hats. Follow the decision given.

    2. Proceed to the area without wearing your hats. Explain to your supervisor afterwards the reason for your action.

    3. Wear your hat while in the area, consistent with the RCMP policy.

    4. Do not attempt to arrest the suspects at this time as their identity is known. Wait for another time to arrest them.

Observation

The Observation questions will test your ability to pay attention to details in visual material. For each question, you will examine a set of five sketches of faces. For each set, the first drawing will be identified as a sketch of an alleged criminal. The other drawings will be labelled "a", "b", "c", and "d."

For each set of drawings, one of the drawings labelled "a", "b", "c", or "d" will have near identical facial features to those in the first drawing of the alleged criminal. Your task is to identify this drawing. In making your decision, you are to assume that no plastic surgery has occurred.

To complete the task accurately, focus on features that are unlikely to be altered without plastic surgery. For example, examine the shape of the eyes, the size and appearance of the nose, the shape of the face, etc. Do not be distracted by features that can easily be altered, such as hair style and colour, facial hair, and clothing.

Use a process of elimination when completing the task. Eliminate any pictures in which you notice a difference in a feature that is unlikely to change without plastic surgery. Once three pictures have been eliminated, the remaining picture should be the correct answer.

Some activities that can help improve your observation performance include:

  • Completing "spot the difference" puzzles often found in newspapers,
  • Doing "find Waldo" puzzles, and
  • Completing "word search" puzzles.

Though the above activities are not the same as the task on the test, they do allow you to practice using your observation skills.

Practice questions

  1. Suspected criminal
    Sketch of suspected criminal
    Potential matches
    1. Sketch of potential match # 1
    2. Sketch of potential match # 2
    3. Sketch of potential match # 3
    4. Sketch of potential match # 4
  2. Suspected criminal
    Sketch of suspected criminal
    Potential matches
    1. Sketch of potential match # 1
    2. Sketch of potential match # 2
    3. Sketch of potential match # 3
    4. Sketch of potential match # 4

Logic

The Logic questions will examine your ability to identify and analyze problems and situations using deductive processes (ability to apply general rules to a problem and arrive at a logical answer) and inductive processes (ability to combine information in order to form general rules). This will be assessed using a variety of questions. You will be asked to complete tasks such as ordering pieces of information in a logical sequence, following directions on a map, determining the pattern that exists in a set of data, and solving problems.

To solve many of the presented puzzles, it is important that you organize your thoughts. Solve one piece of the puzzle at a time; it is unlikely that a solution will be obtained by trying to examine all of the data at once. It is also important to organize the order in which each piece of the puzzle should be solved. The solutions to some aspects of the puzzles cannot be obtained without the solution to some other pieces of the puzzle. In some instances, creating a diagram of the information on a piece of scrap paper may help to organize your thoughts.

Some activities that can help improve your logic performance include:

  • Review logic puzzle magazines that feature puzzles similar to those found in the RCMP Entrance Exam;
  • Play computer games (e.g., adventure games, puzzle games) that make use of logic skills to solve them; and
  • Read mystery novels such as Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series. Try to solve the crime before the hero does.

Practice questions

  1. You are preparing a report concerning a car accident. The following five pieces of information are to be included in the report:

    1. Constable MacInnis explained that the car was heading east bound on 84th Avenue in the first lane and had struck a young girl who was running across 84th Avenue.

    2. The statement was not obtained at this time, as the driver of the car was too emotionally upset.

    3. Constable Smith attended the scene of a car accident and was briefed by Constable MacInnis of what had occurred.

    4. The driver was then turned over to Constable Smith for a statement.

    5. Constable MacInnis then stated that he had detained the driver of the car and that he had read him his rights.

In which of the following orders should the information in the report be presented?

  1. 1, 5, 2, 4, 3

  2. 3, 5, 1, 4, 2

  3. 1, 2, 4, 3, 5

  4. 3, 1, 5, 4, 2

Questions 16 and 17 refer to the following information:

You are investigating a serious accident involving five cars. The car at the front of the accident is labeled 1 and the car at the back of the accident is labelled 5. The remaining cars are labelled according to their location in the chain of cars. The information related to the accident is sketchy and somewhat disorganized. You know the following:

  1. The drivers involved in the accident are Paul, Kim, Jennifer, Kevin, and Sarah.
  2. Kevin was in one of the cars ahead of Kim.
  3. Sarah and Jennifer were in car 1 and 5, although not necessarily in that order.
  1. Which one of the following statements must be false?

    1. Kim is in a car ahead of Sarah

    2. Kim is in car 2

    3. Paul is in car 2

    4. Kim is in a car behind Paul

  2. If Kevin is in car 3, which one of the following statements must be true?

    1. Paul is in a car behind Kim

    2. Kim is in a car ahead of Sarah

    3. Sarah is in car 1

    4. Paul is in a car ahead of Kevin

Computation

Computation questions will evaluate your ability to complete basic computations. It will examine if you know when to and how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide. It will also evaluate some very basic algebra skills. The knowledge of mathematics required to do well in this section is no higher than a Grade 9 level. You will not be allowed to use a calculator.

Some activities that can help improve your computation performance include:

  • Re-read a high school math textbook, which can often be found at a local library (no higher than the Grade 9 level is required). You will also be able to locate this type of material online.

  • Practice solving a variety of math problems on a daily basis (e.g., when paying for a product, calculate in your head how much change you should expect before the cashier gives it, or try to calculate the amount of tax that needs to be paid for a product prior to arriving at the check-out).

Practice questions

Questions 18 to 19 refer to the following information:

The RCMP has developed strategic partnerships with various financial institutions, both nationally and internationally, in an effort to reduce the counterfeiting of currency and credit cards. The following table reflects the amount of success they have had over a five year period. For questions 18 and 19, assume that the two currencies are at par (i.e., CDN $1 = US $1).

Counterfeiting Seizure Statistics

Year

Canadian Currency

American Currency

1996

$5,121

$72,500

1997

$3,211

$850,000

1998

$2,127

$63,427

1999

$7,500

$22,500

2000

$6,835

$54,073

  1. What percentage of the total funds seized in 1999 was Canadian?

    1. 3%

    2. 4%

    3. 25%

    4. 33%

  2. What percentage of all the seized American funds was seized in 1997?

    1. 29%

    2. 78%

    3. 80%

    4. 99%

Questions 20 and 21 refer to the following scenario:

After a drug investigation, police officers seized the following items from three arrested persons:

Arrested person

Amount of cocaine

Number of $100 bills

Number of $50 bills

Number of $20 bills

Smith

2.6 kg

111

45

34

Hasek

0.5 kg

35

21

26

Ramji

1.8 kg

20

135

5

Assume one gram of cocaine is worth $90.

  1. How much cash did the officers take from suspect Hasek?

    1. $4,070

    2. $5,070

    3. $13,940

    4. $49,070

  2. What was the value of all the items taken from all the arrested persons?

    1. $378,750

    2. $459,905

    3. $468,950

    4. $514,440

Memory

Note: The paper-and-pencil exam includes an evaluation of your ability to memorize pictorial and textual materials over a period of time.

You will be presented with four mug shots of individuals, along with their names, descriptions, and the crimes for which they are wanted.

In addition you will be provided with descriptions of six vehicles. The descriptions will include the makes and colours of the vehicles, the vehicle licence plates, and, occasionally, a crime in which the vehicle was involved. Your task is to memorize all of this information. You will be asked nine questions pertaining to this information approximately thirty minutes into the exam to assess how well you memorized the information.

A sample of the type of information you will be asked to memorize is as follows:

Name: David McClury
Gender: Male
Age: 27
Eye Colour: Green
Hair Colour: Brown
Identifying features: Tattoo of skull on upper left biceps
Crime wanted for: Murder

Some activities that can help improve your memory performance include:

  • Memorize textual material such as articles in newspapers. Test yourself on what you remember 30 minutes later;

  • Memorize pictures of individuals in the newspaper, and the names of the people in the pictures. Test yourself after 30 minutes to see how much you can remember;

  • Ask a friend to note the makes, colours, and licence plates of a few cars in a parking lot. Give yourself approximately two minutes to memorize this information, and then test yourself 30 minutes later; and

  • Try to draw direct links between the information you are trying to memorize and thing that are familiar to you. Whenever possible, use imagery to help you to remember the information (i.e., form a picture of the information in your mind).

The Six Factor Personality Questionnaire (SFPQ)

The Six Factor Personality Questionnaire (SPFQ) measures an applicant's conscientiousness. This measure is used as an indicator of traits such as honesty, integrity, and commitment.

The definition of conscientiousness is: behaviour governed by, or conforming to, the dictates of conscience; principled.

The SFPQ has 108 statements and has a time limit of 45 minutes. It usually takes 20-30 minutes to complete.

You are asked to indicate to what extent you agree or disagree with each statement. For example:

Statement: I love order and regularity

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly Agree

1

2

3

4

5

There is no need to try to 'prepare' for the SFPQ. Just remember that it is critical to be honest. Both honesty and integrity are core values of the RCMP. The commitment to these values is tested at several steps in the application process so if you are not honest during the SFPQ, it will become evident in a later step within the application process.

It is very important that you answer every question on the SFPQ. Failure to do so may lead to an inability to determine your conscientiousness score. Because the conscientiousness score is required to proceed in the application process, an incomplete questionnaire may mean you have to rewrite the RCMP Entrance Exam, which will cause a significant delay in your application.

Scoring, Re-writing, and Tips to Improve

The RCMP Entrance Exam score is out of five and will reflect how you performed on both parts of the test – the e-RPAT and the SFPQ. Sixty per cent of your final score is based on the e-RPAT and forty per cent is based on the SFPQ

The minimum score needed on the e-RPAT/RPAT to be selected to move forward in the application process is 3.20 (out of five).

If you would like to try to improve your score, you can rewrite the exam after six months. It is important to note that only your most recent score is used for selection purposes, even if you scored higher on an earlier exam.

If you choose to rewrite, you will be required to sign a security form indicating that you have not written the exam in the past six months. If it is later determined that six months have not elapsed since the last time you wrote the exam, a signature on the form would be seen as indication of an integrity problem and will have an impact on your application.

Preparation Tips

If you wrote the exam and didn't pass or didn't have a high enough score to be selected to continue in the application process, here are a couple things you can do to improve your score when you rewrite the exam:

  • Practice, practice, practice! There are several police officer exam guides with practice questions available in hard copy and online. While many of these are American, the qualities evaluated are often very similar;

  • Practice with other types of standardized exams such as the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and the American Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). There is some overlap in the aptitudes and abilities measured on these exams and those measured by the RCMP Entrance Exam. The grading scales of these tests are quite different than the scale used by the RCMP so use these only as practice to familiarize yourself with the type of questions you may see on the RCMP Entrance Exam, and not an indicator of how well you'll do.

Exam Taking Tips

  • Read the instructions carefully. It is important you clearly understand what you are expected to do. If you are unclear, ask questions before you start the exam. Failing to follow the instructions may result in a lower score, or in certain circumstances, disqualify you from the RCMP selection process.

    Note: For the paper-and-pencil version, the instructions will be read out by the test administrator – make sure to listen carefully.

  • Read the questions carefully. Make sure you understand what the question is asking before you select your answer.

  • Try to determine an answer before looking over the choices provided. However, read all of the offered choices before selecting your final answer.

  • If you are unsure of an answer, eliminate the options you know are wrong. Even if you can only eliminate one option, you will at least limit your guess to fewer options, thereby increasing your chance of guessing correctly.

  • Do not get hung-up on any one question. If you are having difficulties with a question, make your best guess and move on. If time allows after you've answered all the questions in that stage, you can return to it. If you waste time on a question you don't know the answer to, you might not get to some questions for which you do know the answer and you'll lose out on those points.

  • Never leave a question unanswered. If you don't know, guess. There's no penalty for a wrong answer.

  • Manage your time well. Pay attention to the timer on the computer screen and be aware of how much time is left.

    Note: For the paper-and-pencil version, make sure you bring a watch. The test administrator will occasionally announce the time remaining, but it's best to keep track of it yourself.

  • Don't panic. Exams can be very stressful events. If you feel yourself getting too anxious during the test, take a couple of minutes to collect yourself. When you are ready, proceed. It may be a good idea to move on from a question if it's making you especially anxious and come back to it later if time permits.

Research has definitively shown this type of personnel-selection is a good predictor of job performance, regardless of the type of profession. The RCMP Entrance Exam is a very important first step on the path to becoming a police officer with the RCMP.

We hope this guide is helpful. Beyond preparing you for the content of the RCMP Entrance Exam, we hope it helps to calm any nervousness you may feel.

Good luck!

References

ITP Nelson Canadian Dictionary of the English language: An encyclopedic reference (1997). Scarborough, Canada: ITP Nelson.

Shaw, H. (1993). Errors in English and ways to correct them (4th ed). New York:

Harper Paperbacks. Strunk Jr., W., & White, E.B. (1979). The elements of style (3rd ed). New York: Macmillan Publishing. Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1984). Markham, ON: Thomas Allen & Son.

Note. The Dictionaries, Shaw (1993) and Strunk & White (1979) references are the exact material used at the time of developing the RCMP Entrance Exam

Answers to practice questions

English composition

  1. The correct answer is "d".

    The correct spelling for option d is "irrational" (i.e., without the "e" at the end).

  2. The correct answer is "b".

    The correct spelling for option b is "coefficient" (i.e., two "f"s).

  3. The correct answer is "d".

    Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1984) defines give up as "to cease to do some action: ABANDON". This definition works well at completing a meaningful sentence. The other options do not.

  4. The correct answer is "a".

    The first blank is for one of the subjects of the verbs "to go" and "to begin". "I" and not "me", which is used as an object of a verb, is the appropriate pronoun to use as the subject of the verbs. Next, the sentence is written in the past (went is the past tense of "to go"). Began is the past tense of "to begin".

  5. The correct option is "c".

    ITP Nelson Canadian Dictionary of the English Language: An Encyclopedic Reference (1997) defines amendment as "the act of changing for the better; improvement." Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1984) defines amendment as, "the act of changing or modifying for the better."

    Option "c" is the best match of these definitions.

  6. The correct option is "c".

    The bolded text in the question is one of the definitions of induction provided by ITP Nelson Canadian Dictionary of the English Language: An Encyclopedic Reference (1997). Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1984) defines induction as, "inference of a generalized conclusion from particular instances," paralleling the definition provided in ITP Nelson Canadian Dictionary of the English Language: An Encyclopedic Reference (1997).

English comprehension

  1. The correct answer is "d".

    Option "a" is wrong because the passage includes the statement stating, "Originally, most of them (secret organizations) had no criminal intent." The concept of financial assistance as stated in option "b" is never mentioned in the passage. Therefore, it is not supported by the passage.

    Option "c" mentions that ONLY two criminal organizations are known. The passage actually implies that there are more than the two ("This was the case for two of the largest secret organizations of Chinese modern history"). Option "d" is the only option supported by the passage ("some of them [not all] fell under the control of dishonest people").

  2. The correct answer is "a".

    Option "b" is wrong because it states that all leaders had legitimate positions in businesses or in the government. The passage states that it was not uncommon for this to be, but not that it always happened. Option "c" is wrong because the passage makes no claim that the trade of women and children is the main activity of the secret organizations, only that it is one of the illegal activities performed. Option "d" is wrong because it is specifically mentioned in the passage that the organizations controlled brothels. Option "a" is the only option supported by the passage ("To achieve impunity from the law, they corrupted government and colonial officials").

  3. The correct answer is "d".

    Option "a" is wrong because the passage includes the statement, "A strict hierarchy existed and obedience to superiors was mandatory." This statement is not limited to being an apprentice. Option "b" is wrong because the passage identifies degradation (i.e., a reduction in rank) as a form of punishment. Option "c" is wrong because the passage never specifies any penalty that is associated with a particular crime. Option "d" is the only option supported by the text ("a powerful leader could recruit thousands of apprentices". Apprentices was earlier in the passage defined as new members).

Judgment

  1. The correct answer is "b".

    Option "b" is the most effective action because you have called for back-up in a high risk situation. In addition, you have taken steps, once sufficient resources are obtained, to apprehend the individuals. Option "a" is wrong because you have placed yourself at considerable risk by pursuing four males at night in a forest. Option "c" is wrong because the vehicle may be stolen and you have made no attempt to apprehend the suspects at the time when options existed for you to do so. Option "d" is wrong because it is very dangerous to fire a shot into a dark forest.

  2. The correct answer is "d".

    Option "d" is the most effective initial option because Constable Grey is your friend and you have knowledge of the situation. Option "a" is wrong because, although you have provided good advice, there is no indication that Constable Grey has not already contacted a financial advisor. Option "b" is wrong because by lending money to Constable Grey you are not solving her financial problem. Option "c" is wrong because you have meddled too far into a private situation.

  3. The correct answer is "b".

    Option "b" is correct because you have analyzed the risk of not wearing the hat and exercised common sense that, in this case, following RCMP policy will compromise your ability to arrest the suspects in a safe manner. Option "a" is wrong because immediate action is required to apprehend the suspects and should not be delayed due to a minor policy issue. Option "c" is wrong because you have not exercised any decision-making or judgment and have simply followed policy that is not appropriate in this situation; the suspects may flee and, consequently, re-offend. Option "d" is wrong because you are taking a risk of losing the suspects and evidence because of a minor policy issue.

Observation

  1. The correct answer is "b".

    In option "a", notice that the nose is different. In option "c", notice that the eyes are different. In option "d", notice that the ears and the shape of the face are different. Each of these differences are unlikely to occur without plastic surgery. On the other hand, the only difference between option "b" and the suspected criminal is that the picture includes a mustache. This would be a very simple disguise. Option "b" is therefore the most likely match to the suspected criminal.

  2. The correct answer is "b".

    In option "a", notice that the shape of the face is different. In option "c", notice that the shape of the mouth is different. In option "d", notice that the nose is different. Each of these differences are unlikely to occur without plastic surgery. On the other hand, the only difference between option "b" and the suspected criminal is that the picture includes eyeglasses. This would be a very simple disguise. Option "b" is therefore the most likely match to the suspected criminal.

Logic

  1. The correct answer is "d".

    There are several ways in which to correctly arrive at this answer. Here is one way:

    The four options indicate that there are two possible first statements: statement 1 (options "a" and "c") and statement 3 (options "b" and "d"). In statement 1, Constable MacInnis is explaining the situation to someone, yet it is unclear as to who. In statement 3, Constable Smith is just arriving at the scene and begins the briefing with Constable MacInnis. Therefore, Constable Smith is likely the person being spoken to in statement 1, such that statement 3 should occur before statement 1. This narrows the possible correct option to options "b" and "d". In option "b", statement 5 is the next piece of information to use. However, the statement seems to imply some other statement had been made ("Constable MacInnis then stated..."). Statement 1, the second piece of information to use in option "d", is very likely this statement and logically should precede statement 5. Therefore, option "d" is the correct option.

  2. The correct answer is "b".

    There are several ways in which to correctly arrive at this answer. Here is one way:

    This is a problem for which it is extremely helpful to draw a diagram to organize yourself. From the information in the problem text and in clue I, the following diagram can be used:

    Paul

    Kim

    Jennifer

    Kevin

    Sarah

    Car 1

    Car 2

    Car 3

    Car 4

    Car 5

    Place the information found in the clues into the table. Clue III is the most useful, so we will start with that one. From this clue, we can state that Sarah and Jennifer are not in cars 2, 3, or 4.

    Similarly, we can state that Paul, Kim and Kevin are not in cars 1 or 5. This information can be placed in the table.

    Paul

    Kim

    Jennifer

    Kevin

    Sarah

    Car 1

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 2

    NO

    NO

    Car 3

    NO

    NO

    Car 4

    NO

    NO

    Car 5

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Next, Clue II states that Kevin was ahead of Kim. From the information currently in our table, the farthest back Kim can be is in car 4. Therefore, to ensure that he remains ahead of Kim, the farthest back Kevin can be is in car 3. Similarly, from the information currently in our table, the farthest in front Kevin can be is in car 2. Therefore, to ensure that she remains behind Kevin, the farthest front Kim can be is in car 3. This information can be placed in the table.

    Paul

    Kim

    Jennifer

    Kevin

    Sarah

    Car 1

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 2

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 3

    NO

    NO

    Car 4

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 5

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Now we are ready to answer question 1. Option "a" is wrong, because there is a possibility that Sarah could be in car 5 such that the option could be true. Option "c" is wrong because there is the possibility that Paul is in car 2. Option "d" is wrong because there is the possibility that Paul is in car 2 and Kim is in car 3. Option "b" is the correct option, because we have concluded from the information provided that Kim cannot be in car 2.

  3. The correct answer is "d".

    Let us continue with using the tables generated in the last question. We have a new piece of information: Kevin is in car 3. With Kevin in car 3, this means that Kim must be in car 4 (Clue II). In that Jennifer and Sarah are either in cars 1 or 5 (clue III), this means that Paul must be in car 2. This information can be placed in the table.

    Paul

    Kim

    Jennifer

    Kevin

    Sarah

    Car 1

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 2

    YES

    NO

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 3

    NO

    NO

    NO

    YES

    NO

    Car 4

    NO

    YES

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Car 5

    NO

    NO

    NO

    Option "a" is wrong because we have concluded that Paul is in car 2, ahead of Kim in car 4. Option "b" is wrong because there remains the possibility that Sarah is in car 1, ahead of Kim in car 4. Option "c" is wrong because there remains the possibility that Sarah is in car 5. Option "d" is correct because we have concluded that Paul is in car 2, ahead of Kevin in car 3.

Computation

  1. The correct answer is "c".

    The question is focusing on the 1999 data, such that you can ignore all the other years' data. To compute a percentage, you need to know the total value that was seized in 1999. Therefore, you must add the Canadian and American values: $7,500 + $22,500 is equal to $30,000. To determine what the Canadian percentage is, you must divide the Canadian amount by the total: $7,500 divided by $30,000 is equal to .25. To put it into a percentage format, you must multiply this value by 100: `.25 x 100 is equal to 25%.

  2. The correct answer is "c".

    The question is focusing on the American funds, such that you can ignore all the Canadian funds. To compute a percentage, you need to know what the total value of American funds that was seized. Therefore, you must add up all the American funds seized over the years: $72,500 + $850,000 + $63,427 + $22,500 + $54,073 is equal to $1,062,500. To determine what the 1997 percentage is, you must divide the 1997 amount by the total: $850,000 divided by $1,062,500 is equal to .80. To put it into a percentage format, you must multiply this value by 100: .80 x 100 is equal to 80%.

  3. The correct answer is "b".

    The question focuses on the cash, so you should ignore the data under "amount of cocaine." In addition, the question focuses on suspect Hasek, such that you should ignore the data of the other two suspects. To determine the amount of cash, you need to multiply each denomination by the amount of bills. For the $100 bills, this would be $100 x 35 or $3,500. For the $50 bills, this would be $50 x 21 or $1,050. For the $20 bills, this would be 26 x $20 or $520. Next, you need to add up all of these computed values: $3,500 + $1,050 + $520 is equal to $5,070.

  4. The correct answer is "c".

    This question asks information related to all of the items and all of the suspects. Therefore, every piece of data presented in the table is important. The first step is to compute how much cocaine was seized by adding up all of the presented weights: 2.6 kg + .5 kg + 1.8 kg is equal to 4.9 kg. The value of the cocaine is given in dollars per grams, such that you must convert the weight given in kilograms into grams. This is done by multiplying the weight by 1000: 4.9kg x 1000 is equal to 4,900 gm. Next, we have to multiply this weight by the value of 1 gram of cocaine: 4,900 x $90 is equal to $441,000. Next you need to compute how many bills of each denomination were seized.

    For $100, this is 111 + 35 + 20 or 166. For $50, this is 45 + 21 + 135 or 201. For $20, this is 34 + 26 + 5 or 65. Next, you must multiply each of these sums by the denomination it is associated with. For $100, this is $100 x 166 or $16,600. For $50, this is 201 x $50 or $10,050. For $20, this is 65 x $20 or $1,300. Finally, add up all these dollar values and sum it with the value of the cocaine seized: $16,600 + $10,050 + $1,300 + $441,000 is equal to $468,950.

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