Royal Canadian Mounted Police
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Royal Canadian Mounted Police Departmental Performance Report 2011-12

Table of Contents

PDF version (2.5MB)

Minister's Message

Section I: Organizational Overview

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Other Items of Interest


Ministers Message

The Honourable Vic Toews, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

As Minister of Public Safety Canada, I am pleased to present
to Parliament the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for the period ending March 31, 2012.

From local contract police services to combating terrorism,
the RCMP has had considerable success in the last year keeping Canadians safe.

I continue to have strong faith in newly appointed Commissioner Bob Paulson to lead the RCMP into a period of renewal,
while continuing to build on past operational successes.

 

The Honourable Vic Toews, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety Canada



 

 

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison dtre

As Canada’s national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is a critical element of the Government of Canada’s commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Responsibilities

The RCMP’s mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes: preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

RCMP Program Activity Architecture

RCMP Strategic Outcomes Program Activities Program
Sub-Activities
1. Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

1.1 Police Operations

1.1.1 Policing Services Under Contract

1.1.2 Federal Policing

1.1.3 Technical Services and Operational Support

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services

1.2.1 Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support

1.2.2 Canadian Firearms Program

1.2.3 Advanced Police Training

2. Canadas police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally 2.1 International Operations

2.1.1 International Stability and Development

2.1.2 International Cooperation

2.2 Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

2.2.1 Musical Ride

2.2.2 Partnerships and Heritage

3. Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death 3.1 Statutory Payments

3.1.1 Compensation to Members Injured on Duty

3.1.2 Survivor Income Plan

3.1.3 RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments

  4.1 Internal Services

4.1.1 Governance and Management Support

4.1.2 Resource Management Services

4.1.3 Asset Management Services

 

Organizational Priorities

The RCMP’s five strategic priorities were selected after an extensive review of the external environment, crime trends and the Force’s national threat assessments. The identification and communication of these priorities throughout the organization facilitates the strategic focusing of operations and resources. Plans and performance indicators are assigned for each strategic priority and are detailed within this report and on the RCMP website 1.

Summary of Progress against Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Serious and organized crime Ongoing

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Description

Through awareness, education and enforcement, the RCMP has made significant contributions in reducing serious and organized criminality throughout Canada. In this reporting period, the RCMP was successful in disrupting 69 organized crime groups that represent criminal threats at the national and provincial levels. Disruptions included the arrests of targets, seizure or restraint of proceeds of crime and, in some cases, the total dismantlement of the organized crime group.

Through cooperation with a number of domestic and foreign law enforcement and intelligence agencies, the RCMP was also successful in detecting and preventing other serious and organized acts of criminality including the disruption of over 17 human smuggling operations. As an area of improvement, the RCMP is undertaking initiatives to advance the application of tactical and strategic intelligence to police operations. Activities include promoting information sharing within law enforcement as well as strengthening partnerships between police and the private sector security community.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
National Security Ongoing

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Description

National Security remains a top priority for Canadians and complements the Government of Canada’s overall objective to achieve a safe and secure Canada. The RCMP’s law enforcement mandate permitted the disruption of nine individuals and/or groups from carrying out criminal activity that posed a threat to national security. In this reporting period, there were a number of ongoing criminal investigations into threats to the security of Canada that resulted in criminal charges being laid against 25 individuals.

Through cooperation with a number of domestic and foreign law enforcement and security and intelligence agencies, the RCMP has detected and prevented threats to national security. The RCMP’s extensive outreach efforts have also contributed to the prevention of national security threats by working with a number of communities in countering violent extremism and radicalization to violence. One area that requires improved capabilities is countering cyber-threats 2 to national security. Terrorist groups have expressed interest in developing the capabilities for computer-based attacks against Canada’s critical infrastructure. Cyber technology is vulnerable to those who attack digital infrastructure. Cyberspace is also easily used to recruit, communicate and facilitate criminal operations.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Economic Integrity Ongoing

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Canadas police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Description

The RCMP, in collaboration with domestic and foreign law enforcement, as well as intelligence agencies and financial institutions, contributes to the stability of Canada’s economic and political systems 3. In this regard, the RCMP continues to make strides in the fight against economic crimes through the aggressive enforcement of laws related to money laundering, proceeds of crime, corruption, counterfeit currency and payment cards, identity fraud, bankruptcy and capital markets offences, as well as through proactive educational initiatives. Significant results were achieved in this reporting period as follows:

  • the Integrated Market Enforcement Teams had six ongoing prosecutions before the courts;
  • the use of counterfeit notes passed into the Canadian financial system declined by 2.4 percent, continuing a downward trend since 2004 in currency counterfeiting;
  • the RCMP’s International Anti-Corruption Team’s efforts to combat bribery of foreign public officials led to a record $9.5 million in fines and victim’s surcharge;
  • the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre disrupted criminal organizations and prevented millions in losses and thousands of Canadians from being victimized; and
  • the RCMP Proceeds of Crime Program effected property seizures with a value in excess of $10 million and referred approximately $165 million of other unreported goods/monies to agencies such as the Canada Revenue Agency and provincial asset forfeiture programs.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Aboriginal Communities Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Description

The RCMP is proud of its work with many of Canada’s Aboriginal communities, providing policing services to over 600 Aboriginal communities across the country. Dedicated to building upon valued relationships, RCMP members at the detachment level participate in local activities in order to develop and maintain relationships, creating an environment that promotes traditions and fosters equality and trust. On October 29, 2011, the RCMP presented a report entitled The Role of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police During the Indian Residential School System to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

In developing the report, the RCMP sought to gain a better understanding of its role during the era, and through the publication of the study wished to document and demonstrate its dedication to the healing and reconciliation process. This report, while an assessment of past practices, will help set future direction to ensure positive actions and interactions. Finally, the RCMP has also implemented an online training course, “Aboriginal and First Nations Awareness”, which is mandatory for new members and all employees of the RCMP in the Northern Territories. This course will help RCMP employees develop the skills and knowledge to recognize and ultimately respect Aboriginal values and traditions. Completion rates for the course have increased from 8.8 percent in 2009-10 to 16.4 percent by the end of the 2010-11 fiscal year.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Youth Ongoing Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Description

Community partnerships are of paramount importance to the long-term prevention of youth crime and victimization, and as such, the RCMP works closely with local organizations and social services to ensure that youth offenders and victims receive assistance. The RCMP believes that long-term prevention of youth crime and victimization can only be accomplished in partnership with the community. Numerous activities were undertaken within the reporting period. For example, 27 percent of detachments undertook formal consultations with youth as part of an overall community process that set forth policing priorities for the year.

The RCMP also actively engages youth in the development of prevention strategies, as evidenced by the Youth Leadership and Project Development Workshop held in October 2011 at the RCMP Depot Training Academy in Regina, Saskatchewan. The workshop brought together 21 youths who were then paired with RCMP officers from across the country to develop youth-led crime prevention projects. These projects are now being implemented and monitored across the country. Educational efforts are also underway for RCMP officers. For example, the National Youth Officer training program was recently developed to provide front-line members with the tools, knowledge, practice and skills required to support, interact and gain a greater understanding of the youth community.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Management Priority Previously committed to

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Canadas police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Description

Achieve a high level of trust and confidence in the RCMP:

The RCMP has defined trust as faith and confidence in the reliability and strength of leadership throughout the organization, and in the RCMP’s ability to provide the highest quality of service delivered in an effective, competent and consistent manner. In a survey conducted during the reporting period, 85 percent of Canadians and 82 percent of contract clients agreed that they had trust and confidence in the RCMP. Additionally, 66 percent of Canadians and 76 percent of contract clients agreed that the RCMP has strong and reliable leaders.

Provide world-class police services:

The RCMP strives to deliver a world-class police service by matching performance with reasonable expectations, modelling systems of open communications and accountability, and establishing constructive and collaborative relationships with partner agencies and stakeholder groups. Over 88 percent of Canadians and 76 percent of contract clients agreed that the RCMP places emphasis on providing good service. Moreover, 87 percent of Canadians and 89 percent of contract clients responded that they are satisfied with the RCMP’s contribution to ensuring a safe and secure Canada.

Tailor police services to meet identified needs:

The RCMP places emphasis on identifying and understanding policing needs across the country and tailoring its services to meet those needs. When surveyed, 84 percent of Canadians and 67 percent of contract clients agreed that RCMP personnel are responsive to the needs in their community, province, territory or organization.

Risk Analysis

RCMP strategic decision making continues to be supported by a robust integrated risk management regime. The RCMP continually evaluates strategies, priorities and the deployment of human and financial resources in order to respond to emerging challenges and threats through a coordinated approach. The Force’s strategic planning activities set corporate objectives and clarify the capacity to manage and tolerate certain risks by providing context for the assessment and ranking of relevant risk information. Senior management attention is then focused on identifying a manageable number of risks in the context of the RCMP’s mandate, objectives, available resources and capacity which are then set out in a corporate risk profile (CRP). The CRP is developed with an understanding of the underlying drivers and characteristics that combine to produce a broad range of internal and external risks for the RCMP.

Information for the 2010-2013 CRP was gleaned from various external sources including: environmental scans; client and employee surveys; legislative requirements, inquiries and reports such as reports published by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada; and results of Horizontal Audits performed by the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada. Internally, consideration was given to information derived from Strategic Priority Working Groups, Internal Audit and Evaluation reports, National Communication Services and risk information identified by RCMP divisions through business planning processes and related interviews with senior managers.

Risk assessment exercises identified 118 risks, which were grouped into 15 risk trends:

  • Demographic variances
  • Supporting major events
  • Information sharing
  • Legislated and regulatory
  • Sustainable funding
  • Unique community issues
  • Conflicting priorities
  • Loss of corporate knowledge and experience
  • Governance and leadership
  • Alignment of planning activities
  • Learning and development
  • Managing partnerships
  • Recruiting, retention and succession planning
  • Technology and systems
  • Building infrastructure

These risks were “plotted” on the CRP, based on the likelihood of the risk occurring and the impact if the risk were to transpire. The most significant risks were considered by senior management and addressed by RCMP business and service lines through a range of policies, regulations, directives, guidelines and delegation of authority levels. The CRP will continue to evolve based on operational requirements, thereby providing a meaningful contribution to the RCMP’s priority setting and resource allocation decisions.

Summary of Performance

2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

3,026.0 3,173.4 2,974.5 

 

2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
30,525 30,922 4 397

Summary of Performance Tables

Progress Toward Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Performance Indicators Targets 2011-12 Performance
Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with the RCMP’s contribution to a safe and secure Canada 85% 82%
Weighted crime severity index (in RCMP jurisdictions) 105 5 100.10

 

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Performance Indicators Targets 2011-12 Performance
Percentage of respondents who agree that the RCMP provides effective support of international operations

Police partners: 74%

Other stakeholders: 85% 6

Police partners: 100%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Percentage of respondents worldwide who can correctly identify a uniformed member in Red Serge and a horse and rider from the Musical Ride as originating from Canada

Red Serge: 63%

Musical Ride: 55%

 N/A 7

 

Performance Summary, Excluding Internal Services
Program Activity 2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ millions) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities*
Actual
Spending*

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

Police Operations
1,840.5 1,645.2 1,737.2 1,785.4 1,667.3 A safe and secure Canada
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 257.8 263.8 270.3 268.7 256.2 A safe and secure Canada
International Operations 57.8 57.6 58.8 78.5 60.9 A safe and secure world through international engagement
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 13.1 11.3 11.3 12.1 12.3 8 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
Statutory Payments 111.9 121.1 121.1 126.8 122.8 Income security and employment for Canadians
Total 2,281.1 2,099.0 2,198.7 2,271.5 2,119.5  

 

Performance Summary for Internal Services
Program Activity 2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ millions)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities*
Actual
Spending*

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

Internal Services 826.3 784.0 827.3 901.9 855.0

Expenditure Profile

In 2011-12, the Main Estimates were increased through Supplementary Estimates and allotment transfers from Treasury Board by $290.4 million. Actual spending was $199 million less than total authorities including $40 million in frozen allotments which is funding not available for use in the year resulting in an overall real lapse of 5 percent. The lapse by vote is as follows: approximately $123 million in operating funds is primarily attributed to lower than projected costs; $70 million within the capital vote for various projects that were deferred or delayed; and $6 million in reduced Transfer Payment funding requirements.

On August 4, 2011, the Government of Canada announced the creation of Shared Services Canada (SSC) to consolidate and streamline the delivery of email, data centre and network services for 43 departments and agencies. The RCMP was identified as one of the 43 organizations to transfer some IT services and associated staff to the new agency. As of March 31, 2012, the RCMP transferred $77.9 million in authorities and $52.6 million in expenditures to SSC.

Total spending on RCMP Programs has declined by 11 percent over the past two years. This decrease is explained primarily by the fact that 2009-10 and 2010-11 expenditures included significant extraordinary spending incurred to provide security for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, and the G8 and G20 Summits in June 2010. Further, in addition to the transfer of certain IT expenditures to Shared Services Canada, the RCMP has also implemented cost reduction measures related to its 2008 Strategic Review and other Government-wide efficiency initiatives in 2011-12.

Although overall expenditures are decreasing, as noted in the third Quarterly Financial Report, personnel expenditures have increased and were 2.9 percent higher in 2011-12 compared to 2010-11. The increase in personnel expenditures is attributed to the liquidation of severance pay as a result of revisions to specified collective agreements and to a 1.5 percent increase in salary expenditures related to collective bargaining agreements.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the RCMP’s Votes and/or Statutory Expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II) publication. An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2012 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website 9.

 

Expenditure Profile - Spending Trend Graph

[text version]

 

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcomes

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

Program Activity 1.1: Police Operations

Program Activity Description

Under the authority of the RCMP Act, this Program Activity provides Canadians with policing services at the federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels and within Aboriginal communities. This program contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities in addition to education and awareness activities delivered by employees of the RCMP to the public, businesses and other agencies/organizations within Canada.

The RCMP’s education and awareness activities– for example information sessions on national security, financial crime, drugs and organized crime – are aimed at reducing victimization of Canadians. Additionally, this program ensures the protection of designated persons and security at major events which, in turn, mitigates any potential threats to Canada’s population. The program also delivers a high level of technical and operational support to ensure that the RCMP reaches its overarching goal of reducing criminal activity which affects Canadians.


2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities * Actual Spending *

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

1,737.2 1,785.4 1,667.3 


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
22,894 22,617 10 -277


Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadians have access to quality policing services Number of occurrences Not applicable 11 2,656,561
Percentage of crime file clearance rates To be determined 12 46% 13
Percentage of violent crime clearance rates To be determined 14 72%
RCMP clients have access to high quality Provincial, Territorial, Municipal and Aboriginal policing services Percentage of contract respondents satisfied that the RCMP provides a high quality service

Provincial: 80%

Territorial: 80%

Municipal: 80%

Aboriginal Community Leaders: 80%

All contract partners: 80%
Canadians, their institutions, major events and internationally protected persons or other foreign dignitaries in Canada, are safe and secure Percentage of respondents who are satisfied with the RCMP’s federal policing activities 80%
81%
Federal Statute Crime Rate per capita To be determined 15 Other Federal Statute Crime Rate per 100,000 population: 61.90
Number of organized crime groups disrupted 16 for violating federal laws To be determined 17 69
Number of disruptions 18, through law enforcement actions, to the ability of groups or individuals to carry out terrorist criminal activity or other criminal activity that may pose a threat to national security in Canada or abroad 6 9
Number of incidents that compromised the safety of RCMP protectees and the security of Canadian interests 0 0
Percentage of events successfully secured 100% 100%
Percentage of Canadians who feel that the RCMP takes every measure to ensure the safety and security of government-led summits and other high profile events 90% 92%
Technical capacity, scientific policing methodologies and specialized investigative expertise enhances policing operations Percentage of respondents who agree that the technical services/operational support they received was of a high quality 80% 71% 19
Percentage of respondents who agree that the technical investigation support they received assisted in the investigation in a timely manner 80% N/A 20

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Policing Services under Contract

Through the Police Service Agreements, the RCMP provides policing services to eight provinces (excluding Ontario and Québec), three territories, approximately 150 municipalities 21 and to over 600 Aboriginal communities through 119 Community Tripartite Agreements. It has been common practice to refer to the Police Service Agreements as contracts, hence the origins of the term “contract policing”. In 2011, there were 69,438 active police officers in Canada, with approximately 19,000 RCMP members, of which 12,500 members are “contract policing”officers.

The RCMP provides communities with an effective and professional police service which can seamlessly investigate local priorities that may have linkages to provincial/territorial, national and international investigations. RCMP officers are highly trained and come with a wide variety of personal and policing experience resulting in a workforce that is as diverse and dynamic as the communities they serve. Having this pool of highly qualified police officers, from one end of the country to the other, enables the RCMP to quickly and successfully supply a large contingent of resources that can respond rapidly to front-line emergencies and critical incidents, and to conduct investigations, enforcement and prevention, community policing and crime reduction activities. The model of policing utilized by the RCMP means that Canadians have at their service a competent workforce that represents considerable amount of law enforcement expertise and which is in a constant state of improvement through careful planning, training and skill development. Canadians benefit from standardized policies, procedures and protocols based on the best practices and vast experience of this world-class policing organization.

RCMP contract policing is recognized as an effective model to address the cross-jurisdictional and evolving nature of crime. In 2011-12, Contract and Aboriginal Policing continued to work on the contract negotiations for the renewal of Police Service Agreements (PSAs) with the end result being that all eight provinces and three territories have ratified their new agreements. The new PSAs came into effect on April 1, 2012 and are for a period of 20 years. The new agreements include an update to the financial basis of contract policing, with the objective of increasing transparency and sustainability by moving to actual costs and sharing the legitimate costs of providing and maintaining a police service. In addition, the new agreements reflect efforts to modernize the relationship between the contract jurisdictions, the federal government and the RCMP through the creation of a Contract Management Committee (CMC). The CMC will: strengthen accountability between the RCMP and the contract jurisdictions; enhance reporting on costs and issues that affect the police service; provide meaningful consultation in advance of decisions being made that will, or may, affect the costs, quality, capacity and/or governance of the Provincial/Territorial Police Service and of National RCMP Programs (e.g., recruiting and Depot training); and ensure consistent application of the terms and conditions of the agreements.

Community policing is a partnership in which the RCMP and the community share in the delivery of police services. This approach recognizes that police services are integral to society – and not a separate entity – and that the main function of policing is problem solving. National Crime Prevention Services, as a partner to the Federal Family Violence Initiative, receives annual funding to distribute information to support communities in responding to relationship violence, victim issues and sexual assault investigators training. RCMP divisions also participate in a wide range of activities to reduce incidents of violence in the home and community. These activities are designed to: promote law enforcement programs of the RCMP; provide assistance to victims of crime; and address early risk factors among vulnerable populations, children and youth at risk. The RCMP also works to prevent recidivism among high risk groups, foster prevention in Aboriginal communities, and address family and relationship violence through crime prevention initiatives. In 2011-12, the RCMP’s Family Violence Initiative Fund committed $270,000 for 23 innovative projects, which were funded to strengthen community capacity to respond to family violence in Canada.

The RCMP maintains a national policy on violence in relationships, which requires police to respond swiftly and to investigate and document all complaints. RCMP training opportunities include a Domestic Violence Investigations course offered through e-learning, which encourages officers to take a proactive and collaborative approach in promoting and managing victim safety. It outlines recommended best practices and current information from police and other experts in the field, and also alerts police officers to the potential risk factors that may be present in domestic violence cases. In 2011-12, the RCMP implemented domestic violence units in a number of jurisdictions, which partners police members with trained victim service workers and other agencies, within the context of investigations of violence against women. The RCMP also participates in coordinated, multi-agency, community-based initiatives or programs to reduce the incidence of violence in relationships and raise public awareness.

In 2011-12, the RCMP continued to advance several alternative policing models to improve community safety. These enhanced service delivery models assist in balancing the proactive, preventative and reactive demands placed on core policing resources. For instance, 12 Community Program Officers provide communities with the enhanced policing option of civilian, unarmed, non-peace-officers who focus on crime prevention, community engagement/mobilization and crime reduction. The organization is currently developing options to support the nationwide implementation of the program.

Another alternative policing model for the enhanced delivery of policing services was developed by National Aboriginal Policing Services. The Aboriginal Community Constable (ACC) pilot project focused on the recruitment, selection and training of Aboriginal people to provide enhanced policing services for Aboriginal communities. Following recruitment efforts in Manitoba, Alberta, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, the first Aboriginal Community Constable pilot troop graduated from the RCMP Academy (i.e., Depot Division in Regina, Saskatchewan) on April 12, 2011. Four ACCs are currently working in Aboriginal communities in Manitoba: one in a First Nation community in Alberta and another at Fort Smith, Northwest Territories. Following strong support and continued interest from communities currently participating in the ACC pilot program, the RCMP is recruiting a second pilot troop of ACCs with a start date for training planned in early 2013.

Furthermore, the Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program (APTP) offers Canadian Aboriginal people aged 19 to 29 the opportunity to experience daily police work with the RCMP. This 17-week summer program provides candidates with hands-on experience at Depot and with a unique opportunity to work in or near their home community at a detachment with RCMP police officers. Similarly, for several years the RCMP “F” Division has developed and implemented the Community Cadet Corps program in First Nation and Métis communities throughout Saskatchewan. Participation levels by the end of 2011-12 saw 18 active Aboriginal Community Cadet Corps (ACCC) throughout Saskatchewan and 642 youth participants in the program. The program is administered in partnership with the communities involved and is viewed as contributing to positive outcomes for youth and Aboriginal communities. At a Band Council meeting of the Pelican Lake First Nations (IR191), a youth justice worker for the Saskatchewan First Nation noted that a significant reduction in costs to repair vandalism-related damage (i.e., $15,000 down from $80,000) was seen in the year after the ACCC was implemented in the community. While this is not enough information to draw any causal link, it does speak to a level of confidence in the program and a feeling that something positive is happening in
the community.

Street gangs often include youth members and adversely affect many Aboriginal communities throughout Manitoba. The “D” Division Integrated Gang Intelligence Unit (IGIU) is a provincially funded unit that plays an important role in reducing the threat of serious and organized crime. The mandate of the IGIU is to identify and combat street gang activity in Manitoba through intelligence-led and integrated policing initiatives. The IGIU works in partnership with law enforcement and correctional agencies throughout
the province in order to combat street gang activity. In 2011-12, the Division’s Project DRENCH– IGIU examined Indian Posse activity in Manitoba using an intelligence probe that ran between July 2011 and March 2012. The probe focused on drug distribution and violence perpetrated by the gang. The IGIU worked in partnership with other RCMP sections and police agencies to obtain information, create intelligence and conduct enforcement action. Project DRENCH resulted in charges against six people and the seizure of $1,860 in cash, approximately 720 grams of powder cocaine, 1.5 ounces of crack cocaine, 74 prescription pills, a stolen handgun and a ballistic vest. The probe identified the Indian Posse structure, methods of operation and enforcement options.

In order to deliver a professional and culturally competent police service, and to ensure that RCMP employees have the skills and knowledge to recognize and pay respect to Aboriginal values and traditions, the RCMP has implemented an online training course. The “Aboriginal and First Nations Awareness Course” is mandatory for all new Regular Members across the country and for all employees of the RCMP in the northern territories. The course provides a foundational understanding of the history of Canada’s Aboriginal people and includes information on the impact of colonialism and the residential school system, as well as the unique position of Aboriginal people within Canada’s social structure. Completion rates for new members increased from 8.8 percent in the first quarter of 2011-12 to 16.4 percent by the fourth quarter at fiscal year-end, and are expected to grow exponentially in the next fiscal year.

The RCMP continues to improve the quality of its investigations by committing personnel, resources and tools to investigate and analyze files of missing and murdered persons. Dedicated teams of investigators continue to review files involving missing and murdered women in British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. The RCMP National Aboriginal Policing Services has a member dedicated to liaise with Aboriginal organizations including the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC). This partnership has led to the development of a community education toolkit, entitled “Navigating the Missing Persons Process”, which can be found in the NWAC’s Community Resource Guide “What Can I Do to Help the Families of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls” 22. Furthermore, the RCMP established the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains within the existing Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children. This will ensure that the RCMP has the resources to continue to pursue these cases and employ all available investigational avenues. The centre has employed an experienced Aboriginal police officer from the National Aboriginal Policing Services to focus on the specific issue of missing Aboriginal persons. In December 2011, the RCMP and the Assembly of First Nations signed a joint agreement that will see the two organizations working collaboratively on issues related to missing and murdered Aboriginal persons.

Federal Policing

The sovereignty and stability of Canada is protected through the prevention, investigation, disruption and prosecution of criminal activity. The enforcement components of the RCMP’s Federal and International Operations protect Canada’s perimeter security, investigate financial, serious and organized crimes, and conduct anti-drug enforcement operations.

There were several notable operational successes during the fiscal year contributing to the protection of public safety and economic integrity. For example, in 2011-12,
the RCMP was successful in disrupting 69 organized crime groups. Disruptions entailed arrests of organized crime targets and the seizure or restraint of proceeds of crime from criminal organizations. In some cases, the disruption efforts directly contributed to the total dismantlement of the organized crime groups.

In this reporting year alone, 10 organized crime groups involved in the contraband tobacco market were disrupted. The RCMP seized approximately 407,000 cartons and/or unmarked bags of cigarettes, 32,000 kilograms of fine-cut tobacco and approximately 2,200 kilograms of raw leaf tobacco. This represents a decrease of approximately
46 percent in the amount of cartons of contraband cigarettes seized when compared to fiscal year 2010-11. In parallel, since 2009, there has been a 19 percent increase in federal tobacco excise revenues, a 15 percent increase in legitimate tobacco sales and smoking rates have remained stable at approximately 18 percent. These figures reflect that government enforcement measures have been successful in reducing contraband sales.

The RCMP also continues to make strides in the fight against illicit drugs. In support of the National Anti-Drug Strategy, the RCMP launched and implemented the Marihuana Grow Initiative in September 2011 to reduce marihuana grow operations in Canadian communities. Between July 2011 and March 2012, the RCMP dismantled 222 marihuana grow operations. In addition, an annual RCMP marihuana eradication initiative, conducted in partnership with the Canadian Forces, destroyed in excess of 95,000 marihuana plants with an estimated street value of $47.9 million. Furthermore, the RCMP has made significant progress on several fronts regarding its Synthetic Drug Initiative. Most notably, it has developed closer ties with countries in Asia to further facilitate the exchange of information between law enforcement agencies specifically targeting chemical and precursor shipments destined for Canada.

Another significant multi-year anti-drug operation led by the RCMP, in collaboration with the CBSA, resulted in the disruption of a conspiracy to import $860 million of hashish (43.3 tons) into Canada through ports in Halifax, Montreal and Toronto. Such a large quantity of hashish could have supplied every resident of a city of 10,000 with a daily dose for more than 11 years. The RCMP charged nine men with conspiracy, importing and possession of cannabis resin for the purpose of trafficking.

In 2011, the RCMP, in collaboration with the Sûreté du Québec and the CBSA, continued the fight against border criminality. Project CONCEPT aims to reduce border-related criminality through technology solutions, community support and increased interdiction capabilities. Throughout the year, Project CONCEPT’s efforts resulted in 331 successful arrests at Canada’s border for crimes including illicit drug and human smuggling offences.

Human smuggling continues to be a concern for Canadians. Since the arrival of the Ocean Lady (October 2009) and the MV Sun Sea (August 2010) migrant vessels, it was confirmed that Canada has become the target of human smuggling syndicates. In response the RCMP launched an inter-agency task force to aggressively prevent human smuggling and migrant vessels from departing for Canada. Since efforts have resulted in over 17 human smuggling disruptions, and prevented additional ventures destined to Canada.

In February 2012, the RCMP charged an immigration consultant with 42 counts of indictment, including misrepresentation under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. The investigation exposed a criminal organization arranging fake marriages to allow individuals from North Africa to circumvent the Canadian immigration system. The criminal network recruited young Canadian women in the Montreal area to participate in marriages of convenience in exchange for money. The RCMP seized 315 files involving more than 630 persons.

Significant gains were also made by the RCMP in maintaining Canada’s economic integrity. The use of counterfeit notes passed into the Canadian financial system declined by 2.4 percent in 2011. This figure has decreased every year for the past seven years, indicating a steady decline in the prevalence and use of counterfeit currency. Since the Integrated Counterfeit Enforcement Initiative was launched in 2006, the overall reduction in counterfeit notes passed into the Canadian financial system reached approximately 82 percent.

In 2011, the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC) disrupted criminal organizations and prevented millions of dollars in victimization of Canadian citizens. In the same year, more than 100,000 email accounts, 7,309 telephone accounts, 380 websites and 1,194 credit card merchant accounts were forwarded by the Centre to service providers for appropriate intervention. In addition, financial institutions were notified of 67 Canadian bank accounts and 108 foreign bank accounts involved in fraudulent activity.
The CAFC is jointly managed by the RCMP, the Ontario Provincial Police and the Competition Bureau Canada.

As Canada’s national police force, the RCMP is legislated to detect, prevent, deny, investigate, and gather evidence to support the prosecution of those involved in national security-related criminal acts. Such work is accomplished through National Security Criminal Investigations (NSCI) and related units, such as Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSETs), and National Security Enforcement Sections (NSESs). The RCMP’s INSETs and NSESs work collaboratively with other agencies by maximizing intelligence processes and by taking all reasonable measures to protect Canadians, their institutions, and Canadian officials. In this reporting period, RCMP-led INSET/NSESs laid charges against 25 individuals. Of the 25 individuals, two were charged with criminal offences from Section 83 of the Canadian Criminal Code (CCC). The others were charged with offences under other sections of the CCC, including uttering threats, personating peace officer, and the Security of Information Act.

This reporting year marks a notable operational success for the RCMP and its partnership with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Canadian Forces, the CBSA, Communications Security Establishment Canada and the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. Sub-Lieutenant Jeffrey Paul Delisle was posted as an intelligence officer to a naval intelligence centre at Canada Forces Base Halifax, a multinational base with access to secret data from NATO countries. Delisle is the first person to be charged under the Security of Information Act with breach of trust and communicating safeguarded information to a foreign entity without lawful authority. This investigation demonstrated that Canada is not immune to threats posed by foreign entities wishing to undermine Canadian sovereignty. This case is ongoing and is presently before the Court.

Operational support elements, such as community outreach and engagement, critical infrastructure protection and inquiry support are paramount in furthering the RCMP’s national security priority. The Suspicious Incident Reporting system (SIR) was created for critical infrastructure private sector partners to input information about suspicious behaviour and criminal activity or reports about indicators of terrorist pre-attack planning online. The SIR reports are then reviewed and analyzed by Criminal Intelligence analysts. The SIR system is currently being used by 28 private sector partners from critical infrastructure areas including energy and utilities, water, financial, manufacturing, government and transportation. In this reporting period a total of 285 reports were submitted.

During the reporting period, the Minister of Public Safety Canada released Building Resilience against Terrorism: Canada’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy, which sets out Canada’s approach to tackling this global and domestic threat. The strategy reflects the ongoing and multifaceted activities of Government departments and agencies that are involved in counter terrorism. The strategy describes the four elements needed – prevent, detect, deny and respond – to achieve the goal of countering domestic and international terrorism to protect Canada, Canadians and Canadian interests.

The RCMP National Security Community Outreach Coordinators continue to build on the “prevent” element of the strategy. As such, the RCMP continues to engage all communities across Canada – including diverse ethnic, cultural and religious communities – in protecting Canada’s national security from the threat of violent extremism. These efforts help educate communities so they can resist attempts to radicalize young people and build community resilience against messages and activities that promote hatred and criminality towards others.

The coordinators work at the grassroots level in a community policing capacity to address the issue of radicalization to violence, utilizing tools such as the “Youth Online and at Risk” awareness CD. They meet twice a year to share best practices and bring in expert speakers who can provide them with prevention models that can be applied in the Canadian context. An example of their work includes the RCMP’s “E” (British Columbia) Division partnering with local communities to expand on the Junior Police Academy, an initiative designed to engage youth to build community and police relationships. Coordinators in “H” (Nova Scotia) Division also partnered with CSIS to promote the “Youth Online and at Risk” within schools. This initiative has proven to be such a positive event that it was replicated at “O” (Ontario) Division in September. Students viewed a mock crime scene investigation and watched the police dogs in action. They went through a series of police marching drills and a fitness test, before receiving a certificate of completion.

In the past year, the RCMP continued to partner with Public Safety Canada at the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security (CCRS) to attend community outreach events and to create an open forum for dialogue between the CCRS and community members. Recently, members of the CCRS visited Muslim communities in the Hamilton and St. Catharines areas to present an interactive video aimed at youth that was based on a radicalization case from the United Kingdom. The CCRS encouraged community members to play a more active role in reducing the threat of terrorism. The RCMP understands that effective counter radicalization to violence will require the joint effort of the police and the community.

The RCMP’s national security efforts also benefited from educational and outreach opportunities. The Leadership in Counter Terrorism (LinCT) Program is a joint leadership project between the Australian Federal Police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Police Service of Northern Ireland, the Scottish Police College and the RCMP. The LinCT Program aims to challenge accepted perspectives on terrorism while exposing participants to a wide range of case studies, literature and discussions with international experts, academics and practitioners. The LinCT participants are operational officers at the senior executive rank with responsibility for national security enforcement, criminal and security intelligence and counter terrorism investigations. The RCMP hosted the fourth week of the program in Halifax, Nova Scotia and 40 candidates, including four RCMP officers, graduated.

The RCMP has also created the Counter Terrorism Information Officer Initiative, which is designed to provide individuals, including first responders such as fire, police officers and emergency medical services personnel, with terrorism awareness training. The goal of the initiative is to increase national security awareness in first responders across the country so that they may identify national security threats at the earliest possible stage. During this reporting period, there were 16 Counter Terrorism Information Officer training sessions with 456 people receiving the training.

In addition to such activities, the RCMP’s National Security Criminal Investigations (NSCI) Program provides a range of analytical products intended to inform RCMP senior management, partners and stakeholders about global trends and their potential impact on RCMP operations. These products include ad hoc briefings and notes, the NSCI Quarterly Newsletter (four produced) and the Security and Intelligence Compendium (44 produced).
The RCMP’s Critical Infrastructure Intelligence Team (CIIT) develops and produces a range of criminal intelligence products as part of its support to Critical Infrastructure (CI) stakeholders. Some products are specific to security-cleared CI stakeholders such as the weekly Operational Brief pertaining to emerging RCMP national security files. Other deliverables, such as the CIIT Assessment (10 produced), are unclassified. CIIT’s criminal intelligence products provide situational awareness and investigative support for RCMP management and national security investigative teams. They also support CI stakeholders in the preparation of threat, risk and vulnerability assessments, as well as RCMP points of contact on criminal issues of shared concern.

In 2011-12, the NSCI’s Strategic Assessment Unit actively presented and participated in six counter terrorism and countering violent extremism fora, including: the Five Eyes Intelligence Alliance (Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand); the Centre of Global Counter Terrorism Cooperation; the G8 Roma-Lyon’s practitioner’s group; and the Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies. These events addressed the nature and scope of countering violent extremism, radicalization to violence, the changing role of women in Islamist extremist ideology, countering terrorism implications in the Arab Spring and the threat environment.

Throughout the fiscal year, NSCI participated at 13 conferences to discuss the RCMP’s approach to identify transnational threats, identify and share best practices, counter violence to extremism, and to collaborate on training, applied research and analysis. Some of the topics included: a presentation on the RCMP’s CAPRA model 23, a collaborative problem solving model at the NATO Conference in Turkey, the Canadian experience in countering radicalization to violence at a conference hosted by the US Department of Justice Community Oriented Policing Services, and at the International Association of the Chiefs of Police countering violent extremism working group. NSCI also represented Canada at the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe expert roundtable, which brought together experts in the fields of security, gender and human rights including representatives from intergovernmental organizations, civil society and academia. The objective was to exchange experiences, share good practices and formulate recommendations on how to strengthen women’s roles and facilitate women’s empowerment in countering violent extremism and radicalization that lead to terrorism.

The RCMP is committed to maximizing its intelligence capacity to improve preventative and defensive measures against terrorists and criminals who target RCMP protectees. In 2011-12, the RCMP achieved a success rate of 100 percent in ensuring the safety of its protectees and the security of Canadian interests, as well as the safety and security of government-led summits and high profile events and visits. Protective Policing also continued to focus on delivering professional and innovative services for the diverse needs of its clients, partners and stakeholders. To ensure an effective, integrated approach for protective policing services, the RCMP strives to improve its existing partnerships, while continually seeking out new relationships. One example of this was the successful royal visit of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and Catherine Middleton, and the key collaboration between the RCMP and the Department of Canadian Heritage. In addition, multiple provincial and municipal governments, organizations, and departments worked collaboratively to provide a safe and secure visit and it allowed for the formation or enhancement of important working relationships.

Technical Services and Operational Support

The RCMP uses numerous specialized techniques in conducting major criminal investigations. Last year, the RCMP’s Technical Operations provided specialized investigative and operational expertise to front-line police officers during major investigations, with respect to covert entry, covert electronic and physical security, computer search and seizure and forensic analysis. The RCMP also built partnerships with various Canadian and international agencies to maintain its ability to lawfully intercept communications including the ongoing development and sharing of specialized tools and techniques to respond to the multitude of sophisticated devices readily available on the market. In addition, the RCMP collaborated with Public Safety Canada, other government departments, law enforcement agencies and industry to enhance legislation to respond to investigative challenges created by the evolution of communications technologies.

Lessons Learned

Policing Services under Contract

Ensuring the safety of the public is of paramount importance to police operations. Equally important is ensuring the safety of police officers, which is extremely difficult when police officers are confronted with individuals who are armed and possess superior firepower to the traditional police patrol shotgun. In 2011, the RCMP, in partnership with the Canadian Police Research Centre, identified limitations in the RCMP’s current firearms capabilities and proposed options to address those restrictions. This research included input from the National RCMP Policy Working Group, which created a list of operational requirements through scenario-based discussions and user testing. The RCMP Senior Executive Committee considered the results and determined that along with training and policy enhancements, the Colt C8 patrol carbine should be deployed for use by RCMP general duty members.

This rifle has a proven track record and is already used by RCMP Emergency Response Teams, as well as a number of other Canadian law enforcement agencies and the Canadian Forces. Like other patrol carbines, it is a light, short barreled rifle that offers advantages over other long-guns including precision, reduced penetration and higher magazine capacity. It is designed to withstand extremely cold, hot, wet and/or dirty conditions, reflecting the wide variety of environments in which RCMP members operate. Utilizing a project governance model, the RCMP has engaged its contract policing partners to establish divisional needs and a deployment strategy based on consultation and identified requirements. The RCMP will continue to develop the policy and training requirements for the patrol carbine as well as a communications strategy for its employees, partners and stakeholders.

Federal Policing

The RCMP consistently reviews its security measures and business practices to ensure that clients are provided with appropriate, efficient and effective services. Protective Policing Services, along with other security partners, continues to work towards establishing and maintaining an overarching framework for the planning of security operations at major events. This framework provides a “whole of government” template that guides collaborative planning and facilitates: the implementation of security measures; a responsive integrated risk management 24 process; a knowledge management system that captures and updates best practices and lessons learned from major events as a repository for value-added tools, templates, guides and manuals; and governance, with the authority to link policy, legislation and mandate with functions, tasks and expertise, all within the business planning cycle.

Findings and lessons learned from previous major events – such as the Royal Visit of The Duke of York, Prince Andrew, the Meeting of the Finance Ministers of the Americas and Caribbean, and Government of Canada Planning & Priorities Meetings – will be applied to all major events to ensure seamless delivery. Protective Policing Services continues to strengthen its relationships with participating partners to ensure that a transparent and fully integrated approach is taken when a major event is held within Canada or at international events outside the country. These include sporting events, such as the 2011 Pan American/Para Pan American Games held in Guadalajara, Mexico, and ceremonial events, such as the commemoration of Vimy Ridge in France.

The RCMP will also continue to look for ways to become more effective through the prevention, investigation, disruption and prosecution of criminal activity. Through restructuring and realigning resources, the RCMP will streamline its Federal Policing program to deliver services on a priority-basis rather than a commodity-based approach. The creation of a nationally standardized, prioritization framework will focus on countering the highest criminal threats to public safety. This prioritization framework should realize efficiencies through a reduced capacity in non-priority areas and a reinvestment in priority areas. Establishing clear priority-based targets is expected to increase our capacity to focus on attacking serious and organized crime.

A priority-based approach to operations is contingent upon a robust intelligence gathering and analysis process. To support this requirement, the RCMP is constructing a data-driven model, aligning with a results-oriented, “Primacy of Operations” work philosophy. The RCMP is also undertaking initiatives to improve the application of tactical and strategic intelligence to police operations. Activities include improving information sharing within law enforcement, as well as strengthening partnerships between police and private sector security communities for the purposes of combating serious and organized crimes.

Over the years, the RCMP has been the subject of public inquiries about its national security criminal investigations. It is recognized that proper training is needed for the RCMP to continue to improve on the management and conduct of national security criminal investigations. As such, the National Security Criminal Investigator’s Course is designed to provide candidates with the background, knowledge and operational tools necessary to conduct national security criminal investigations in an efficient, effective and accountable manner. In this reporting period, there were four courses delivered with 116 candidates trained.

Further, a Terrorist Financing Course has been designed to enhance and develop the investigative skills of individuals working on terrorist financing investigations. In this reporting period, there were two anti-terrorist financing courses delivered with 47 candidates trained. The objectives within these two specialized courses cover a variety of topics including the Anti-Terrorist Act, section 83 of the Canadian Criminal Code, investigative techniques and multi-cultural awareness.

National Security Criminal Investigations will continue to work with other RCMP units, as well as other partner agencies, to ensure a strong, integrated law enforcement response to national security-related criminal activity and domestic radicalization to violence. As detailed under the planning summary, a Canadian citizen was the first person to be charged under the Security of Information Act with breach of trust and communicating safeguarded information to a foreign entity without lawful authority. This investigation demonstrated that Canada is not immune to threats posed by foreign entities wishing to undermine Canadian sovereignty.

In addition, the RCMP will also continue to build on key relationships with domestic and international partners such as: the Five Eyes Intelligence Alliance; the Canadian Association of the Chiefs of Police – Counter Terrorism and National Security Committee; the International Association of the Chiefs of Police (IACP) – Countering Violent Extremism working group; and the IACP Committee on Terrorism. In collaboration with the RCMP’s international partners, “a Common Lexicon dealing with Right Wing Issues” and documents on “Foreign Fighters and Lone Actors” have been produced. The RCMP also continues to participate in the creation of the Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) Centre of Excellence where experts and practitioners from different regions highlight lessons learned and best practices in developing, operating and working at training and/or research centres. Input and lessons learned from participants on these topics will assist CVE Centre staff in conducting next steps (i.e., needs analysis) and in crafting a top-level strategy outlining the mission, values and priorities for research and training.

Technical Services and Operational Support

In 2011-12, the RCMP conducted an audit to assess the effectiveness of the management practices that support activities of the Technological Crime Program and its capacity to provide specialized support services in criminal intelligence gathering and criminal investigations. This audit was selected in recognition of an increase in criminal activity involving computer and electronic devices. Over the last few years, several measures were implemented to increase the effectiveness of the Technological Crime Program. These include the development of an Understudy Program, the Digital Investigator of Computer Evidence initiative and the introduction of preview stations.
Recently, other measures have been established in response to the audit to increase the effectiveness of the program. A priority setting system was put in place which determines the order by which files are assigned. Requests can now be made to the program for assistance from other divisions to reduce the backlog of service calls. An inventory of tools within the program was implemented including a new method to evaluate new and existing products. Lastly, all Integrated Technological Crime Units will perform a review of their exhibits in 2012-13 to improve the handling of electronic exhibits while ensuring integrity of the evidence.

Major events in Canada and overseas are becoming increasingly challenging due to the complexity of technical security solutions such as electronic, mechanical and physical security systems. Over the last few years, the RCMP has provided security solutions for the North American Leaders Summits, the Francophonie Summit, the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and the G8/G20 Summits. There are numerous international working groups in the area of offensive/investigative support, but none with a “technical” focus for defensive/protective support. Collectively, these working groups are spending millions of dollars and thousands of hours in conducting research and development and implementing best practices. The RCMP believes there is a great opportunity for international police agencies to share information and it will continue to contribute to and reap the benefits of this cooperative effort to address the policing requirements of the 21st century.

Program Activity 1.2: Canadian Law Enforcement Services

Program Activity Description

Canadian Law Enforcement Services provides the Canadian law enforcement community with the necessary scientific, technical, investigative and educational support to deliver proactive, intelligence-based policing and law enforcement services to their respective communities and partners. Additionally, this program provides educational opportunities to members of the Canadian law enforcement community to enable them to develop their skills thus increasing their effectiveness in contributing to a safer Canada. This program is necessary to ensure that Canadian law enforcement communities have access to the required tools, systems, technologies (i.e., forensic support and expertise, criminal intelligence and firearms registry and databases, etc) and education which, in turn, will contribute to the reduction of criminal activity affecting Canadians.


2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities * Actual Spending *

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

270.3 268.7 256.2  


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
2,333 2,244 25 -89 

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Technical, forensic, investigative and educational activities support Canada’s law enforcement community

Percentage of respondents who agree that overall the RCMP provides high quality service

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Police partners: 77%

Other stakeholders: 79%

Percentage of respondents who agree that overall the RCMP provides high quality scientific, technical and investigative services

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Police partners: 89%

Other stakeholders: 71% 26

Sustainable intelligence-led policing is supported Percentage of respondents who agree that RCMP information and intelligence are accurate

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Police partners: 77%

Other stakeholders: 75%

Percentage of respondents who agree that RCMP information and intelligence are comprehensive

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Police partners: 77%

Other stakeholders: 69%

High quality and timely forensic identification services support the policing and criminal justice system Percentage of forensic laboratory service requests completed by
target time
85% 74%
Law enforcement has access to direct support for firearms investigations Percentage of requests fulfilled for assistance with firearms investigations and/or destructions 100% The Canadian Firearms Program fulfilled all 5,734 requests for firearms investigations
Number of queries to the Canadian Firearms Registry online database by front-line police 10% increase year to year Queries increased by 19.6% when compared to the previous fiscal year 27
Public safety is increased through continuous screening of firearms owners Number of prohibited individuals who obtain a firearms licence 0 0

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The RCMP provides sophisticated and reliable services to the Canadian law enforcement community in the fields of forensic analysis, identification services, criminal records information, criminal information and intelligence, technological support and enhanced learning opportunities. In 2011-12, the RCMP focused its efforts on improving these programs and services, collectively known as the National Police Services (NPS), which were provided to policing partners across Canada.

As part of its business transformation in the area of forensic analysis and identification services 28, the RCMP implemented a new intelligence-led forensic investigation process. Since its commencement, the RCMP has significantly improved casework turnaround times, enhanced responsiveness to client needs, and completed considerably more casework within existing resources. From April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012, the RCMP used the new process to complete 93 percent of all priority service requests and 73 percent of all routine service requests within the deadline negotiated with the submitting agency 29. The final phase of the business transformation process has presented some challenges to service delivery, due to a significant increase in the volume and complexity of cases. Necessary adjustments will be made and evaluated as part of the RCMP’s continuous improvement strategy.

Within NPS, the RCMP operates a number of databases that support policing across Canada. As of March 31, 2012, the National DNA Data Bank held 242,184 samples within the Convicted Offender Index and 73,836 samples within the Crime Scene Index. This has resulted in 21,976 Offender to Crime Scene Index hits, helping to identify suspects, and 2,820 Crime Scene to Crime Scene Index hits, linking crimes where there are no suspects. From its inception in 2002 until March 31, 2011, the Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network has accumulated a total of 2,833 hits, connecting firearms to crimes or linking crime scenes.

Another key tool for law enforcement is the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Service, a national repository of fingerprints and criminal record information that consists of approximately four and a half million criminal records. The RCMP encouraged major paper-based contributors to acquire “LiveScan” technology to submit and receive electronic responses for civil screening purposes and established new processes to further increase the number of fingerprints submitted electronically. As a result, the percentage of vulnerable sector checks submitted electronically steadily increased to 67 percent by March 2012. Subsequently, the volume of paper-based vulnerable sector checks has decreased and the wait time for these checks has been significantly reduced to approximately four weeks. Given that the processing time for electronic submissions is approximately two minutes when there is no match to a fingerprint holding, the RCMP will continue to encourage contributors to submit electronically.

Criminal intelligence is of paramount importance for the RCMP and its policing partners. The RCMP uses an intelligence-led policing model to guide its operations and to assist in the development and implementation of effective public policy and strategies to reduce and prevent crime. Last year, the RCMP provided actionable criminal intelligence to decision makers, worked to expand and share the criminal intelligence knowledge base, improved partnerships, and developed new analytical tools to strengthen its assessment of criminal activity and its related impact on Canada. The RCMP also developed a criminal intelligence understudy program to ensure that employees follow a professional and consistent learning and career development path.

On behalf of the Canadian law enforcement community, the RCMP stewards the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC). Composed of a central bureau in Ottawa and 10 provincial bureaus, CISC is mandated to inform the Canadian law enforcement community of threats posed by serious and organized crime and to manage a national database on these issues for all Canadian policing services. In August 2011, the CISC National Executive Committee and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police adopted the Canadian Law Enforcement Strategy to Combat Organized Crime (the Strategy). The Strategy governs collaboration in the areas of intelligence and operations, promotes the sharing of information and the use of the national database, and encourages the operationalization of national and provincial threat assessments to target organized crime groups. CISC also conducted a review of the National Threat Assessment, implementing significant changes to its content, format and frequency of delivery, to ensure it meets the needs of the Canadian law enforcement community.

In 2011-12, the RCMP strengthened the support it provides to national investigations of missing children and missing persons. Work continued on the Missing Children/Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (MC/PUR) database and a national, publicly searchable website, based on the recommendations of a committee of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. The primary focus of these efforts was to increase the amount of data available to police in order to strengthen information sharing between police, coroners and medical examiners across Canada, and to obtain relevant information from the public through the searchable website. The RCMP plans to launch the website and the MC/PUR database in 2012 and 2013, respectively. The RCMP also conducted extensive consultations with Canadian law enforcement agencies, medical examiners and chief coroners to develop best practices for investigations in this area, and will disseminate the resulting report to partners across Canada.

The RCMP expanded the Child Exploitation Tracking System to enable the coordination of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation investigations across jurisdictions and agencies. It also improved the National Sex Offender Registry Database to better share information, broaden access to criminal data amongst the law enforcement community, and ensure the reliability and integrity of that information. These efforts were instrumental in numerous cases including the timely arrest of a woman who threatened to abduct, rape and murder two children, the identification of a registered sex offender in an Internet child sexual exploitation investigation, and the conclusion of a year-long child pornography investigation.

The RCMP Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) oversees the administration of the Firearms Act and its Regulations, which govern the possession, transport, use and storage of firearms in Canada, and provides firearms investigative support to law enforcement. With the assistance of community, safety and law enforcement partners, the CFP provides firearms education and outreach programs, to reduce the risk of harm from firearms through suicide, accidental discharge and antisocial use. The CFP ensures that the RCMP and other law enforcement organizations have access to a single-source firearms reference tool, providing accurate identification and classification of firearms based on existing legislation and up-to-date and comprehensive reference information on firearm makes and models.

In 2011-12, the CFP fulfilled all requests from law enforcement for assistance and maintained the accessibility of a shared platform for information on registered, seized and recovered firearms. Searches on the Canadian Firearms Registry Online increased by 19.6 percent compared to the previous year, exceeding 18,200 per day. Additionally, the CFP screens the population of firearm applicants to confirm their eligibility to possess firearms, and promotes responsible ownership, use and storage of firearms. The CFP ensured that no individual retained their possession or acquisition privileges after their licence had been revoked or refused for public safety reasons or after they had been prohibited from possessing firearms. In 2011-12, the Program’s Chief Firearms Officers screened and monitored businesses through the firearms licensing regime. While most businesses were found to be compliant, several criminal investigations were also launched.

In addition to investigational support, the RCMP is committed to providing advanced and specialized learning and training for the law enforcement community. Through the Canadian Police College, the RCMP provides a comprehensive training program to enhance police capacity in addressing increasingly complex criminality and emerging criminal trends. In 2011-12, the College provided 186 training sessions, through more than 62 training courses and workshops. This included training on organized crime, cybercrime, explosives, Internet-luring, identity fraud, economic crime and Aboriginal policing.
The Canadian Police College Leadership Development Centre also provided executive and leadership development to prepare future police leaders. Approximately 4,000 police officers and law enforcement officials from Canada and around the world attended these sessions.

Lessons Learned

While the RCMP continues to take steps to appropriately manage finite resources, demand for services from both law enforcement and the public sector are growing significantly and are exceeding resourcing levels. In June 2011, the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) released the results of its NPS audit, which assessed the progress of the government and the RCMP towards keeping commitments made from previous OAG audits 30. The RCMP was assessed on its improvement of certain national police services and the OAG made recommendations in two key areas related to governance and funding. The Government agreed with all of the OAG’s recommendations and has already taken steps to address some issues related to governance, specifically the creation of the National Police Services National Advisory Committee (NPS NAC) and funding (the initiation of a study of NPS transactional costs). Other recommendations are being addressed as part of the RCMP’s ongoing NPS Renewal and Sustainability Initiative.

In January 2012, Public Safety Canada, in consultation with the RCMP, received endorsement from Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Justice and Public Safety to establish a governance structure that will help inform the way forward for NPS. The governance structure includes the establishment of the NPS NAC, which is comprised of provincial and territorial law enforcement representatives and the RCMP. The NPS NAC will strengthen the voice of the law enforcement community by providing recommendations on the prioritization of NPS services and related funding allocations. The inaugural NPS NAC meeting was held in Ottawa from March 20 to 22, 2012. This meeting enhanced members’ understanding of the scope, breadth and depth of NPS services and set a foundation for meetings scheduled in 2012-13, which will allow the group to develop a strategy and action plan for the future of NPS.

In 2011, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner completed an audit of selected RCMP operational databases, which included the Police Reporting Occurrence System (PROS) and Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) 31. The audit was released publicly as part of the Privacy Commissioner’s Annual Report to Parliament on November 17, 2011. In the report, two important issues relating to the PROS database were identified: non-compliance to the Criminal Records Act for processing pardon notifications; and non-compliance to RCMP retention and disposal schedules for purging personal information. The RCMP accepted all of the Privacy Commissioner’s recommendations and implemented a detailed action plan to address the concerns identified in the audit. Corrective actions included the initiation of a purge process which cleared out approximately 450,000 records per week. The purge was completed by December 31, 2011 and all new files will be purged automatically according to their associated retention period. Since PROS went into full production in 2005, there have been no known cases of wrongful convictions under the control of the RCMP. The CPIC audit addressed RCMP policies and procedures governing the access and use of CPIC, as well as compliance with the Privacy Act. The final report determined that the RCMP has well established policies and procedures to protect personal information of Canadians that is accessed and used in the CPIC database.

A second CPIC audit was conducted by RCMP Internal Audit. This audit sought to determine if adequate monitoring and oversight measures were in place to ensure the integrity and reliability of information held in CPIC databases. Since the audit findings were released, the RCMP has engaged with a private sector accounting firm to define parameters for risk-based audit methodology, which will be used to assess the accuracy and reliability of information held within CPIC. The CPIC’s Field Services Unit is also collaborating with police partners and stakeholders to ensure respective agency processes and procedures are considered in the new risk-based audit methodology.

Internally, the RCMP is developing an enterprise approach to the organization’s information management and information technology strategy that will strengthen information management and improve delivery of technology in support of operational policing. A client portfolio management function was successfully implemented, which has helped the RCMP improve the communication of its information management and information technology needs. The RCMP is committed to addressing information management compliance requirements set out by the Treasury Board Secretariat and Library and Archives Canada and as a result has initiated the Information Management Renewal Project. In response to a 2010 Auditor General’s report, the RCMP formed a working group to explore solutions to the issue of aging technology and to develop a standardized tool to assess application and infrastructure risks across the organization 32. The working group identified 13 systems at risk and recommended these be decommissioned over the next several years. The RCMP also established a new governance structure, the National Police Information Services Advisory Board, to ensure a coordinated law enforcement approach to information services issues. Together with independent review and stakeholder input, the creation of this board permitted the RCMP to initiate a business renewal strategy in its Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Service and to improve workflow efficiencies and align priorities with client needs.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Program Activity 2.1: International Operations

Program Activity Description

This program furthers Canada’s global peace and security agenda through cooperation and support of the international law enforcement community, thereby ensuring that both Canadians and the global community are safer. This program is necessary as it addresses the transnational scope of crime and terrorism by building relationships with international policing partners, participating in the INTERPOL global information sharing network and conducting extra-territorial criminal investigations. Additionally, the RCMP actively participates in multiple missions abroad in a peacekeeping role and by providing support to nations at risk in building their law enforcement capacity. Through this international cooperation and collaboration, this program contributes directly to a more secure world and Canada.


2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities * Actual Spending *

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

58.8 78.5 60.9


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
350 274 33 -76

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada’s global peace agenda is promoted through cooperation and support of the international community Percentage of respondents who agree that the RCMP provides effective support of international operations

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 85%

Police partners: N/A 34

Other stakeholders: 80%

Percentage of respondents who agree that the RCMP is one of their first considerations when seeking international assistance

Police partners: 80%

Police partners: N/A 35
Number of Canadian police officers who are deployed abroad to international peace operations

250

210
Number of recommendations for criminal charges in extra-territorial national security criminal investigations To be determined 36 0

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

For more than 20 years, Canada has deployed police officers to missions around the world. By building the capacity of foreign police to maintain law and order, Canadian police, in cooperation with international partners, have helped to create a safer and more stable global environment. In 2011-12, under the governance framework of the Canadian Police Arrangement (CPA), the RCMP managed the deployment of over 200 Canadian police personnel to peace operations in international locations including Afghanistan, Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guatemala, Haiti, Kyrgyzstan, the Republic of South Sudan, the Republic of the Sudan and the West Bank. In addition, the RCMP also managed deployments to specialized postings to the Special Tribunal for Lebanon at the Netherlands (The Hague) and to Canada’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York.

In addition to its regular deployments, the RCMP and its CPA partners have participated in and supported several training initiatives meant to improve international peace operations. Topics for these initiatives included training of formed police units in United Nations peacekeeping, a workshop intended to improve the United Nations selection process, the development and standardization of a course for United Nations personnel on the prevention and intervention of sexual assault, and a course intended to prepare senior leaders for participation in peace operations. The RCMP also worked with police partners and stakeholders toward the implementation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade’s (DFAIT) action plan in response to the United Nations Security Council Resolution on Women, Peace and Security. In support of this plan, the RCMP has developed recruitment and deployment goals to encourage the active and meaningful participation of women in peace operations. The RCMP recruitment target for international peace operations, mirroring objectives set by the United Nations, is to ensure that
20 percent of deployments are comprised of women. As of March 31, 2012, 12 percent of Canadian police deployed to international peace operations were women.

During the fiscal year, the RCMP also committed to facilitating the appropriate sharing of criminal information with INTERPOL. The INTERPOL Ottawa bureau developed and implemented a communication strategy to promote the value of the INTERPOL/CPIC interface to Canadian law enforcement agencies. Employees from INTERPOL Ottawa delivered several awareness presentations and live demonstrations to interested law enforcement agencies to increase the profile of the interface. Early assessment of the presentations and live demonstrations indicated that the use of the interface has increased, and is expected to continue growing.

Lessons Learned

In accordance with Treasury Board guidelines, a five-year evaluation of the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations Program was conducted in 2011-12. This led to several recommendations that are being addressed by all CPA partners (including DFAIT, Public Safety Canada and the Canadian International Development Agency) through a management response and action plan. The recommendations pertain to several topics including governance, assessment of requests for assistance, the use of standard operating procedures, the role of personnel in peace operations, the marketing of the program and financial comptrollership. The implementation of these recommendations will ensure greater efficiency and stewardship of the program.

In addition to the lessons learned from the evaluation of the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations Program, the RCMP and its CPA partners have identified the need for more robust results-tracking and reporting mechanisms. The RCMP has taken the lead in developing new frameworks and reporting templates which will be implemented in the near future.

Program Activity 2.2: Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

Program Activity Description

Canadian Police Culture and Heritage promotes Canada, the RCMP, its communities and partners by delivering its ceremonial services to all Canadians as well as the international community. Ceremonial Support activities are delivered by the Musical Ride, who tour Canada and abroad four to six months each year showcasing Canada’s proud heritage and culture.

This program responds to both domestic and international requests for historical information about the RCMP. Additionally, the RCMP supports and develops government partners by providing RCMP members in Ceremonial dress at special events (e.g., the Olympics, Expos and Summits), both domestically and internationally. Through the activities of this program, the RCMP contributes to Canada’s vibrant culture and heritage.


2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities * Actual Spending *

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

11.3 12.1 12.3 37


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
100 92 38 -8

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The RCMP is an internationally recognized symbol of Canada Percentage of Canadian respondents who agree that their objectives were met by hosting the Musical Ride 100% 93%
Percentage of international respondents who agree that their objectives were met by hosting the Musical Ride 100% N/A 39
Number of licence agreements or Memoranda of Understanding for the use of the RCMP’s image 89 110
Number of national or international level strategic partnership agreements entered into to promote the RCMP’s image 22 54

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The RCMP, through the Strategic Partnerships and Heritage Branch (SP&HB), supports, promotes and fosters a positive image of the RCMP and Canada, nationally and internationally, by providing a dynamic, recognizable and meaningful symbol of Canada at various trade, sporting and ceremonial events. Due to resource issues, this year proved especially challenging for SP&HB as it was tasked with supporting several special events including the Change of Command ceremony for the new RCMP Commissioner and the official opening of the new National Headquarters complex. Furthermore, preparations for Diamond Jubilee-related events in Canada and in the United Kingdom, as well as planning for two royal visits to Canada, placed additional pressures on finite resources. Despite resourcing pressures, SP&HB fulfilled all of its requirements to internal and external stakeholders.

The RCMP’s historical section, within SP&HB, received over 514 requests for information, of which 398 were from the general public on topics ranging from genealogical research to in-depth projects on Aboriginal policing. Each request was answered within the negotiated diary date for response, and follow-up with requesting agencies or individuals indicated a high level of satisfaction. This sub-program is also responsible for protecting and promoting the RCMP’s global image and intellectual properties, and for the sound management of licensing and technological transfer fees. Under the authority of Treasury Board’s policy on Retention of Royalties and Fees from the Licensing of Crown-Owned Intellectual Property, the RCMP retained 85 percent of the licensing funds collected, which amounted to over $400,000 to reinvest in intellectual property as well as research and development.

Additionally, SP&HB is the policy centre for alternative funding initiatives and charities such as the RCMP Foundation. The Foundation supports the volunteer efforts of RCMP members across Canadian communities to help youth at risk. In this fiscal year, the Foundation funded over $200,000 for projects across Canada including the national Child Identification Kit Program, “Project Escape” in British Columbia, “Talk before You Walk” in Québec, a bullying awareness project in New Brunswick, “Racing against Drugs” in Ontario, and an Iqaluit, Nunavut hockey program for girls.

The Musical Ride is a key portion of the RCMP’s culture and heritage. To ensure Canadians are given an opportunity to see the Musical Ride, a four-year tour schedule has been devised in which each province and territory is visited during the time frame. Within that rotation, the Musical Ride is hosted in Canada by non-profit or charitable organizations and any tickets sold are for local fundraising purposes. During the 2011 tour year, the Musical Ride toured through Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island and Saskatchewan, and conducted 64 performances which were attended by over 350,000 spectators. These 64 performances raised almost $550,000 in funds which were reinvested into the host communities.

Lessons Learned

Stakeholder expectations were high with respect to the RCMP’s involvement in planning major events such as the Diamond Jubilee Pageant, the historic Mounting of the Queen’s Life Guard in London, England, as well as two Royal visits to Canada. These types of major and high profile events require years of planning, and significant resources were dedicated to ensure the future success of these events. In this period of austerity, the RCMP met its stated goals for the cultural and heritage program by implementing creative and innovative partnerships and funding alternatives with private and government partners. SP&HB will continue to evaluate and utilize this approach for upcoming special events including future celebrations for Canada’s 150th anniversary.

Program 4.1: Internal Services

Program Activity Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.


2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities * Actual Spending *

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

827.3 901.9 855.0


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
4,848 5,695 40 847

 

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Communicate effectively Percentage of respondents who agree that they are satisfied with the information that the RCMP provides

Canadians: 80%

Contract clients: 80%

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Canadians: 66%

Contract clients: 66%

Police partners: 63%

Other stakeholders: 75%

Percentage of respondents who agree that they are consulted appropriately on decisions and actions that have an impact on them

Contract clients: 80%

Police partners: 80%

Other stakeholders: 80%

Contract clients: 64%

Police partners: 55%

Other stakeholders: 62%

Percentage of RCMP employees who agree that their manager is a good communicator To be determined 41 N/A 42
Be accountable Percentage of Management Action Plan recommendations implemented by the diary date in response to internal or external audits or Management Reviews 43 100% 44 61%
Percentage of Canadians who agree that public complaints against the RCMP are investigated appropriately with transparency 80% 70%
Percentage of employees who agree that the RCMP fulfilled commitments made to them 80% N/A 45

Live the RCMP core values:

  • Integrity
  • Honesty
  • Professionalism
  • Compassion
  • Respect
  • Accountability
Percentage of Canadians and employees who agree that the RCMP adheres to its core values

Canadians: 90%

RCMP employees: 90%

Canadians: 81%

RCMP employees: N/A 46

Percentage of employees who agree that RCMP policies are aligned with core values and ethics 90% N/A 47
Attract, develop, retain and support RCMP employees Percentage of operational RCMP police officers who meet their Operational Skills Maintenance requirements 100% 35% 48
Percentage of employees who agree that their supervisor facilitates their development by offering new or challenging assignments 80%
No measure available 49

Cadet recruiting benchmarks for employment equity groups:

  • Women
  • Aboriginal peoples
  • Members of a visible minority group

Women: 30%

Aboriginal peoples: 10%

Members of a visible minority group: 20%

Women: 27.1%

Aboriginal peoples: 6.1%

Visible minorities: 15.3% 50

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

During the reporting year, the RCMP committed to strengthening accountability by being open and transparent through the effective management of communications, corporate and financial services and human resources. The RCMP prepared a five-year framework (2012-2017), entitled Communications Focus 2017, to provide guidance to managers and employees at all levels to align the Force’s collective communication efforts in support of the RCMP’s strategic outcomes. In the 2011-12 fiscal year, the RCMP produced a number of new tools aimed at strengthening organizational communications. This included the development of an Internal Communication Toolkit that provides employees with valuable resources to assist them in delivering effective communications. Moreover, the RCMP piloted workshops aimed at educating managers and supervisors on their roles and responsibilities with respect to communications.

In 2011-12, senior leaders of the RCMP aimed to be more visible to Canadians in their respective communities. Key announcements were made across the country to communicate openly with Canadians on the thousands of operations and crime prevention initiatives that were successfully completed. These included the new service agreements between the RCMP and provincial, municipal and territorial partners as well as projects such as the RCMP’s Marihuana Grow Initiative, the “Walk Away, Ignore, Talk It Out and Seek Help” Program, National Missing Children’s Day and the rollout of LiveScan devices to aid in vulnerable sector checks. High profile events were also held to present the report on the role of the RCMP during the Indian Residential School System to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and to promote successful operations to combat international organized crime and intercept the importation of illicit drugs (“O” Division, Ontario). Additionally, the RCMP highlighted coordinated enforcement blitzes in jurisdictions across the country (“D” Division, Manitoba and “K” Division, Alberta) that shut down significant numbers of marihuana grow operations.

The RCMP has also enhanced its authority from central government agencies to allow the organization to be more flexible and responsive to emerging priorities. In March 2012, the RCMP obtained approval from Treasury Board Ministers for the 2012-2017 Investment Plan. The Investment Plan is the primary document outlining the RCMP’s priorities, strategies, governance, direction and commitments for the next five years – as they relate to investments in assets and acquired services – highlighting some $2.3 billion in planned investments over the five-year period. As part of the same Treasury Board approval, the RCMP’s Class 3 Organizational Project Management Capacity was approved along with amendments to the Treasury Board Contracting Policy, which provides the RCMP with the authority to enter into competitive construction contracts and architectural and engineering services contracts related to the delivery of housing and detachment projects. Investment planning is a risk-based approach that supports departmental, portfolio, horizontal and government-wide priorities and also supports sustainable development and broader social and economic objectives for all Canadians.

The RCMP is committed to examining how it addresses issues such as workplace conflict, harassment and discrimination in an effective manner. Specifically, the RCMP explored ways to strengthen oversight and accountability in dealing with complaints related to harassment and discrimination. The Force is continuing to work towards the introduction of a new governance model for the management of harassment-related complaints. This model will ensure consistency in both the application and adherence to the RCMP’s Policy on the Prevention and Resolution of Harassment in the Workplace at every level of the complaint process.

The RCMP also continued its efforts to support employees to “live the RCMP core values” in the workplace and in interacting with Canadians, partners and stakeholders. This was achieved through the development and delivery of courses that incorporated material on ethics and which are delivered throughout a member or employee’s service. In addition, the Office of Professional Integrity, which promotes and guides values-based decision-making and employee behavior across all job categories, participated on both the Policy Working Group and the Senior Policy Committee to review and approve new organizational policies. This has ensured that values and ethics are considered throughout the policy development process. Furthermore, the RCMP continued to research activities and best practice initiatives related to values and ethics through internal and external consultations and survey analysis.

Implementation of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA) continued with the management of several complex investigation files, many of which were brought to conclusion. The RCMP also actively participated in an interdepartmental forum for the sharing of best practices with regard to the PSDPA. Part of this group’s work included identifying issues experienced through implementation of the Act in anticipation of the statute’s five-year external review.

Employee wellness is crucial to the RCMP’s performance, and a supportive, respectful and healthy work environment is a key driver to achieving the organization’s objectives. Existing programs, services and initiatives – such as Member and Employee Assistance Programs, the Duty to Accommodate Program, and health and dental coverage for RCMP members – continue to support the physical and psychological health of employees. Over the 2011-12 planning period, the RCMP continued to look for, and implement, new and innovative ways to improve both the psychological and the physical health and safety of our employees. The RCMP has begun to modernize the way in which health benefits and services are provided to its members 51. Modernization will improve program accountability, oversight and efficiency while at the same time improving services and contributing to the RCMP’s expenditure reduction targets.

The RCMP continued the implementation of the Integrated Talent Management Framework, which directs changes in the way the organization recruits, develops and assesses its employees. The Framework informs decisions on succession planning, awards and recognition, employment equity and promotions. Within this context, the RCMP will continue to reshape learning and development programs to better reflect individual and organizational needs. Existing programs, services and initiatives such as the Field Coaching Program, the Aboriginal Cadet Training Program and the National Performance Programs, as well as new and innovative approaches to recruitment and selection, will support talent management throughout the career lifecycle.

Over the course of the planning period, the RCMP also developed and implemented the Leadership Development Strategy, which incorporates talent management, succession planning, coaching, mentoring, and both formal and informal learning. Existing programs such as the Management Development Program, the Supervisor Development Program and the Full Potential Program also form part of this strategy. The development of a new Integrated Business and Human Resources Strategy, to be implemented in 2012-13, further demonstrates this commitment.

Lessons Learned

The RCMP is committed to improving resource management and accountability to Canadians. In 2011-12, an internal audit was conducted on the Pension Administration Outsourcing Project (PAOP) 52. Three recommendations were offered. An action plan is in place to address these recommendations and key aspects have been incorporated into the revised project approach, schedule and costs. The PAOP will continue to provide regular updates on the audit action plan and will also advise of any material changes should they occur.

The RCMP is also committed to achieving a high level of trust and confidence in the RCMP. In June 2012, the Government tabled Bill C-42, Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act. The Bill provides the RCMP Commissioner with the authority to implement a restructured discipline system as well as new policies related to compensation, conflict management and the grievance process. In moving forward, the RCMP will strengthen accountability and ensure that the workforce is conducive for strong organizational performance to help achieve the overall goal of a safe and secure Canada.

Impacts on Financial and Human Resources Resulting from the Establishment of Shared Services Canada
2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
  Planned Spending Total Authorities *

* Pursuant to section 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and Orders in Council P.C. 2011-0881, P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011-1297, this amount was deemed to have been appropriated to SSC, which resulted in a reduction in the appropriation for Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

** Total authorities, as presented in the "2011–12 Financial Resources" table (and other relevant tables) in the "Summary of Performance" section, is the net of any transfers to SSC. Actual spending does not include expenditures incurred on behalf of SSC as of the OIC date.

Note: The RCMP transferred $52.6 million in expenditures to SSC in 2011-12.

Net transfer post Orders in Council (OIC) ** to Shared Services Canada (SSC) 3,026.0 77.9


2011–12 Human Resources (FTEs)
  Planned Actual *

* Pursuant to section 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and Orders in Council P.C. 2011-0881, P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011-1297, this number reflects the number of positions deemed transferred to SSC.

Note: In 2011-12 the costs associated with the deemed positions were transferred to SSC, though not all of the transfers of persons were completed by March 31, 2012. These are primarily Civilian Member positions of the RCMP who will continue to remain employees of the RCMP under the Business Continuity Framework established with SSC. Civilian Member positions account for 282 of the total deemed transferred to SSC.

Deemed to Shared Services Canada  30,525 384 

 

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights


Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2012
($ millions)
  Change % 2011-12 2010-11
(Restated)
Total net liabilities 1.2% 14,427.2 14,253.0
Total net financial assets 1.6% 13,906.5 13,683.4
Departmental net debt -8.6% 520.7 569.6
Total non-financial assets 2.2% 1,423.9 1,392.7
Departmental net financial position 9.7% 903.2 823.1


Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2012
($ millions)
  Change % 2011-12 2010-11
Total expenses -2.3% 4,861.5 4,976.4
Total revenues 6.5% 1,720.9 1,616.6
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers -6.5% 3,140.6 3,359.8
Departmental net financial position 9.7% 903.2 823.1

Financial Highlights Charts/Graphs

The following charts illustrate the distribution of each of the items in the Statement of Financial Position and the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position.

Assets

Approximately 86.4 percent of the RCMP’s total assets are comprised of amounts Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, the vast majority of which represents funds available to discharge Pension and severance-related liabilities.

The balance of assets is comprised of tangible capital assets (8.9 percent), net accounts receivable and advances (4.3 percent) and inventory (0.4 percent).

Assets by Type Chart

[text version]

Liabilities

The RCMP’s liabilities consist mainly of RCMP Pension Accounts (90.7 percent), accounts payable and accrued liabilities (2.9 percent), and employee severance benefits (3.6 percent).

 

Liabilities by Type Chart

[text version]

Revenues

RCMP’s Policing Services generates 99.8 percent of the respendable amount of revenues. Policing Services contributes to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

 

Revenues by Type Chart

[text version]

Expenses

The majority of the expenses (72.8 percent) are related to the costs of Police Operations, which contribute to a safe and secure Canada by providing general law enforcement activities as well as education and awareness activities.

Approximately 17.1 percent of the expenses are related to Internal Services, which supports the needs of programs and corporate obligations of the RCMP.

Another 6.0 percent are related to activities that contribute to Canadian Law Enforcement Services while 2.5 percent is related to Statutory Payments. The other activities combined represent 4.1 percent of total expenses.

 

Expenses by Type Chart

[text version]


Financial Statements

Detailed financial statements can be found on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police website. 53

List of Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables found in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the RCMP’s website. 54

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs
  • Green Procurement
  • Horizontal Initiatives
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
  • Status Report on Major Crown and Transformational Projects
  • Status Report on Projects Operating With Specific Treasury Board Approval
  • User Fees Reporting

 

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

For inquiries about the RCMP Departmental Performance Report, please contact:

RPP_DPR-RPP_RMR@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Additional Information

Other items of interest can be found on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s website: 55

  • RCMP Corporate Risk Profile
  • Financial Statements (Unaudited) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the year ended March 31, 2011
  • Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility
  • Performance Indicators for Forensic Sciences and Identification Services

 


Endnotes

 

  • 1 Information on the five strategic priorities may be found at: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/prior/index-eng.htm
  • 2 For more information on Canada’s Cyber Security Strategy, please visit: http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/prg/ns/cbr/ccss-scc-eng.aspx
  • 3 For more information on the RCMP’s strategy for economic integrity, please visit: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ei-ie/index-eng.htm
  • 4 In 2011-12, a review of the methodology used to calculate FTEs in the RCMP was conducted, as a new salary forecasting tool (SFT) had been implemented and normalized. Using SFT, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 31,014, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 30,922, which includes both indeterminate and determinate employees. Previous DPR figures included all headcounts for indeterminate staff.
  • 5 The target for crime severity is to have a decrease of five points per year. For more information about the Crime Severity Index, please visit Statistics Canada’s website at: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=85-004-X&lang=eng
  • 6 “Police partners” are chiefs of police and other specified representatives of police agencies. “Other stakeholders” refers to government departments at all levels, private sector and non-government organizations specified as having a relevant relationship with the RCMP.
  • 7 The survey of worldwide respondents was not conducted during the 2011-12 fiscal year. Due to survey costs, this performance indicator will be removed from future reporting documentation and replaced by an updated indicator for the program.
  • 8 Actual spending for Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program Activity is $0.2 million higher than Total Authorities in 2011-12 due to an approved internal reallocation that resulted in the program operating with enhanced authorities.
  • 9 See Public Accounts of Canada 2012: http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/72-eng.html
  • 10 Using the salary forecasting tool to calculate FTEs, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 22,661, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 22,617 that includes both indeterminate and determinate employees.
  • 11 This indicator is included for context only. The original indicators proposed in the Performance Measurement Framework and which were included in the 2011-12 Report on Plans and Priorities were “number of calls received” and “number of calls answered”; however, current occurrence reporting systems do not allow for this exact information to be captured. The number of occurrences gives a similar contextual picture as it reflects the calls received where a report was entered into the occurrence reporting system.
  • 12 An analysis of the trend of these statistics was undertaken, with targets set for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 13 The clearance rate calculated by Statistics Canada excludes traffic offences.
  • 14 An analysis of the trend of these statistics was undertaken, with targets set for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 15 An analysis of the trend of these statistics was undertaken, with targets set for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 16 The disruption of an organized crime group is the interruption of the continuity of the group’s operations or illegal activities (for example, the arrest of an individual or the seizure of drugs or assets). An organized crime group may be disrupted based on three attributes: core business, financial and personnel.
  • 17 An analysis of the trend of these statistics was undertaken, with targets set for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 18 The disruption of terrorist criminal activity is the interruption, suspension or elimination, through law enforcement actions, of the ability of a group or individual to carry out terrorist criminal activity or other criminal activity that may pose a threat to national security in Canada or abroad.
  • 19 The question posed in the 2011-12 survey was defined as “Do you agree that the RCMP Technical Operations places emphasis on providing high quality services?”
  • 20 Results for this survey question were not available for the 2011-12 fiscal year.
  • 21 In the 2011-12 RPP, it was stated that the RCMP “provides policing services to... approximately 180 municipalities across Canada”. Due to the merger of several municipalities across Canada, the accurate number is now 150.
  • 22 The Community Resource Guide, “What Can I Do to Help the Families of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls?”, is available on the NWAC’s website at: http://www.nwac.ca/programs/community-resource-guide-what-can-i-do-help-families-missing-and-murdered-aboriginal-women-
  • 23 The CAPRA model stands for Clients, Acquire/Analyse Information, Partnerships, Response and Assessment of Action Taken. More information can be found at: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ccaps-spcca/capra-eng.htm
  • 24 Integrated Risk Management is an organization-wide process used to understand, manage and communicate risks.
  • 25 Using the salary forecasting tool to calculate FTEs, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 2,216, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 2,244 that includes both indeterminate and determinate employees.
  • 26 The question posed in the 2011-12 survey was defined as “Do you agree or disagree that the RCMP provides effective technologies and investigative techniques?”
  • 27 In 2010-11, there were 5,562,371 queries to the Canadian Firearms Registry Online database by front-line police. This number increased to 6,672,502 in 2011-12.
  • 28 In response to the recommendations contained in the Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, Management of Forensic Laboratory Services, the RCMP has posted performance indicators for the forensic laboratory system at: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/index-eng.htm
  • 29 During the reporting year, 264 of 284 priority service requests and 7,866 of 10,799 routine service requests were completed within the negotiated deadline date.
  • 30 For more information, please visit: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201106_05_e_35373.html
  • 31 For more information, please visit: http://www.priv.gc.ca/information/pub/ar-vr/ar-vr_rcmp_2011_e.pdf
  • 32 For more information on the Auditor General’s report, please visit: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201004_01_e_33714.html
  • 33 Using the salary forecasting tool to calculate FTEs, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 244, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 274 that includes both indeterminate and determinate employees.
  • 34 Survey data for the 2011-12 fiscal year provided a sample size that was insufficient for data release.
  • 35 Survey data for the 2011-12 fiscal year provided a sample size that was insufficient for data release.
  • 36 An analysis of the trend of the statistics was to be undertaken to set targets for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 37 Actual spending for Canadian Police Culture and Heritage Program Activity is $0.2 million higher than Total Authorities in 2011-12 due to an approved internal reallocation that resulted in the program operating with enhanced authorities.
  • 38 Using the salary forecasting tool to calculate FTEs, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 102, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 92 that includes both indeterminate and determinate employees.
  • 39 During the fiscal year 2011-12, the Musical Ride did not tour internationally. All international tours are based on a total cost-recovery basis.
  • 40 Using the salary forecasting tool to calculate FTEs, the restated 2010-11 Actual FTE is 5,791, which is an accurate comparison to the 2011-12 Actual FTE of 5,695 that includes both indeterminate and determinate employees.
  • 41 As this question was not previously posed on RCMP core surveys, the 2011 core survey was to determine the baseline from which a target will be set for 2012-13 and future years.
  • 42 This survey measure will be available during the 2013-14 fiscal year.
  • 43 Follow-up processes for external audits and management reviews preclude reporting in this manner. Subsequent reporting for implementation of recommendations will be aligned with the methodology used for reporting for the Management Accountability Framework.
  • 44 This target will be revisited in subsequent report cycles as 100% may not be a realistic target.
  • 45 This survey measure will be available during the 2013-14 fiscal year.
  • 46 This survey measure will be available during the 2013-14 fiscal year.
  • 47 This survey measure will be available during the 2013-14 fiscal year.
  • 48 The Operational Skills Maintenance (OSM) measure reflects the percentage of regular members who met the requirements on March 15, 2012. Up until October 2011, the measure was comprised of five elements: pistol, baton, carotid, oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray and first aid, which are the generally accepted minimum requirements for peace officers to be considered operationally ready for general duty. As of October 2011, the Incident Management Intervention Model (IMIM) has been included in the measure. As a result of this change and the factors described below, the percentage of regular members who meet the OSM requirements dropped to 35% from 63.2% at the same time last year. As an organization, the RCMP consistently strives for 100%, but it is unable to achieve the target at a particular point in time due to the following factors: certification periods vary for each of the six elements and re-certification rates fluctuate based on a number of variables such as the time of year and the availability of regular members to attend re-certification training. This is a significant factor for regular members serving in remote locations.
  • 49 This issue was not assessed during the 2011-12 fiscal year and therefore no measure of success against the defined target is available.
  • 50 Since the inception of Employment Equity (EE) benchmarks in 2010 the RCMP has seen an increase in the recruitment of EE cadets for the 2011-12 fiscal year. The Force has focused on recruiting EE groups through several means including participating in over 2,800 multicultural events across the country, establishing the Aboriginal Cadet Development Program and launching a national advertising campaign targeting women, visible minorities and Aboriginal peoples. Since November 2011, there has been a marked increase in effort to prioritize the applications from the EE groups that were selected from the Initial Ranked List to proceed. Although the RCMP was not able to meet the recruiting goals, the 2011-12 cadet enrollment results were above the Labour Market Availability indicators and increases were made to female cadets (9.6% to 15.3% = 5.7% and visible minority cadets (56 to 88 = 5.7%) from 2010-11 to 2011-12.
  • 51 Modernization will include amending the Canada Health Act so that regular members of the RCMP are included as insured persons, establishing sick leave banks, introducing a short-term disability program for regular and civilian members, and replacing the RCMP’s Members/Employees Assistance Program with Health Canada’s Employee Assistance Service and an internal peer support network.
  • 52 For more information on the Pension Administration Outsourcing Project Audit, please visit: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/aud-ver/reports-rapports/paop-piap-eng.htm
  • 53 http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/2011-2012/index-eng.htm
  • 54 http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/2011-2012/index-eng.htm
  • 55 http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/2011-2012/index-eng.htm